Joined: August 27th, 2017, 1:38 pm

September 14th, 2018, 4:58 pm #11

Wow. I will have to try and collect my thoughts on this to add more later So much answered and yet so many more questions left to answer.

Bravo.
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wb
Joined: December 2nd, 2006, 8:35 am

September 14th, 2018, 5:35 pm #12

Fred the Great wrote: Bravo Bill, bravo. The end of a saga. I was as sad reading this as I was happy for the characters and their fates (for the most part). You've poured your heart and soul into this, and struggled through your own battles to bring it to us for nothing other than our sometimes too short and too shallow feedback. All I can say is a sincere thank you. I have enjoyed reading, following the action, the characters, and learning more about the world, history and geography and even food, over the past several years. Thank you. 

I am curious about how the post-war world developed. I can imagine there would have been more hostilities here and there, more wars, more threats of war at least. There are hints here, just hints. But if you were of a mind I'd be really interested if you could maybe share a few thoughts on what may have been in your imagination as to what occurred in broad historical brushstrokes in the years between the last chapter and this epilogue - if that makes sense? I could also well understand if you said no, that's for the reader to speculate, but you're the most knowledgeable person on Hartford World so your opinion counts for the most here. Again, thank you. I'm going to miss this. It's the greatest single contribution this board has seen and it will be the poorer for its end, but we are grateful for having shared the ride.    
There are two hints that, together, almost completely define post-war Hartford World.  The more obvious is the post-war story of Thomas B. Adams, telling us that tensions remained high with the us, but that there wasn't war.  The second is the story of the Top Gun school at Goose Bay.  In OTL Goose Bay became a NATO fighter school.  The list of Great Powers using Goose Bay was a list of the expansion of post-war alliances.  The core nations were Great Britain, New England, the Netherlands, and the CSA.  But in time Germany, France, Italy, and Japan were added--leaving the US and the USSR as pariah nations.  Again, there is no mention of war.

Thanks!
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Joined: January 19th, 2011, 11:33 pm

September 14th, 2018, 8:05 pm #13

Interesting.

This is my posted hat tip, but I’m not sure where to go with it as far as feed back.
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wb
Joined: December 2nd, 2006, 8:35 am

September 15th, 2018, 1:29 am #14

Cody2 wrote: Interesting.

This is my posted hat tip, but I’m not sure where to go with it as far as feed back.
Why not? 😉
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wb
Joined: December 2nd, 2006, 8:35 am

September 15th, 2018, 1:30 am #15

Jekolmy wrote: Wow. I will have to try and collect my thoughts on this to add more later So much answered and yet so many more questions left to answer.

Bravo.
Thanks!  Post more later!
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Joined: June 2nd, 2004, 9:45 pm

September 15th, 2018, 2:25 am #16

I read this around lunchtime, and so I had jambalaya in your honor!
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Joined: November 6th, 2012, 1:52 am

September 15th, 2018, 2:52 am #17

Sad to read the epilogue but it does wrap up most of the loose ends and provides closure to a great series. It's been a wonderful journey and will be missed.

From 'Doc' Clark's words is "The Battle for North America" what we have been reading this past decade? If so a neat trick at the very end wb.

Now to see how this looks and reads once all these parts are put together in one place. You have many different story lines weaving through this work and it can be a bit dense to the casual reader so I suspect it will take a few pass throughs to clean and tighten it up prior to release. One thing to consider is to take a tip from David Weber and include a glossary listing and describing the different tanks/ships/planes and people included in the story. After all how is a casual reader going to know who and what they are when at times even we, a much more dedicated and knowledgeable fanbase, forget? Especially over five books!
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Joined: August 27th, 2017, 1:38 pm

September 15th, 2018, 3:06 am #18

wb wrote:
Jekolmy wrote: Wow. I will have to try and collect my thoughts on this to add more later So much answered and yet so many more questions left to answer.

Bravo.
Thanks!  Post more later!
So, I have had a bit of a chance to collect my thoughts and I have either struck gold (I think) or more likely Fool’s Gold and I hope I can adequately express my thoughts.

The BBC presentation is discussing the book (or more likely books) that Admiral Jewel wrote in a very dry style not unlike say a dry OTL broadcast on PBS about the American Civil War and was turned by Admiral Clark into something gripping, personal, and exciting like Gettysburg to extend the thought (and avoiding any WW2 references). As an aside, my mother hates the PBS shows on the Civil War but enjoyed the Gettysburg movie to explain my analogy.

Extending on that further I almost get the feeling that the books we have read for some members of the forum for over ten years, others like myself over the last year or so, IS the book that was published by Admiral Clark. Did he take some liberties with the first-person viewpoints and internal thoughts? Maybe, if the bigger facts of the event follow along with the actual set of events does it really matter? I don’t think so.

This has been a great yarn and it has been spun wonderfully. Thank you for sharing this wonderful story with us all.
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Joined: August 27th, 2017, 1:38 pm

September 15th, 2018, 3:07 am #19

OCRY wrote: Sad to read the epilogue but it does wrap up most of the loose ends and provides closure to a great series. It's been a wonderful journey and will be missed.

From 'Doc' Clark's words is "The Battle for North America" what we have been reading this past decade? If so a neat trick at the very end wb.

Now to see how this looks and reads once all these parts are put together in one place. You have many different story lines weaving through this work and it can be a bit dense to the casual reader so I suspect it will take a few pass throughs to clean and tighten it up prior to release. One thing to consider is to take a tip from David Weber and include a glossary listing and describing the different tanks/ships/planes and people included in the story. After all how is a casual reader going to know who and what they are when at times even we, a much more dedicated and knowledgeable fanbase, forget? Especially over five books!
Gah! Ninja'd! I had the same thought about 9-10 hours ago today and was just able to post now!
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wb
Joined: December 2nd, 2006, 8:35 am

September 15th, 2018, 3:40 am #20

Yes...

What you've been reading for ten years is Doc Clark's "The Battle for North America."

The only place of which I know where the link from research to dialogue becomes tenuous is the speculation upon George O'Brien's last days.

But...

1) He expended the smoke grenade, and witnesses saw him exhaust his magazines and throw his fragmentation grenades without effect; and

2) He left a carving on the seat of his boat explaining to August why he couldn't come back to him--and it involved a conversation with Sarah.

Besides that, look back, and I think that you'll find it described to those who survived.
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