Changes to the USMC ground force

Armies of the World

Changes to the USMC ground force

Joined: December 7th, 2016, 12:00 pm

May 15th, 2018, 3:55 pm #1

http://www.marines.mil/News/Press-Relea ... lethality/

WASHINGTON , D.C. --
The Marines are making strides to become more lethal and agile based on the threats of the future battlefield.
Last week at the annual Ground Awards Dinner, Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Robert B. Neller, offered his recent decisions to many of the Corps’ top officer and enlisted ground combat leaders. 
“We are going to change,” offered Neller. “Not that we aren’t good; we are.  But we must continually strive to get better.” 
Neller added that improvements in technology, mobility, and firepower offer the Marines an asymmetric advantage against potential adversaries, but only if they seize the opportunity.
“The surest way to prevent war is to be prepared to dominate one,” Neller said.  “And that is what we are going to do.”
The Marine Corps Operating Concept (MOC) identified the development of the future force as a critical task and emphasizes that “superior infantry is a Marine Corps asymmetric advantage."
The infantry has always been the heart of the Marine Corps’ warfighting capability and the Commandant wanted to ensure that Marine Corps infantry formations remain the most lethal, agile, and adaptable in the world. 
The MOC, Marine Corps Force 2025 (MCF 2025), as well as the associated Sea Dragon 2025 experiments and evaluations, have informed the Commandant’s decision to make several foundational decisions to increase the lethality, agility, and adaptability of the infantry battalion.
Reorganization of the infantry will occur over the next three-to-five years, although some of the changes are happening now, such as the move to arm infantry Marines with the M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle and the distribution of quadcopters.
Highlights of the announced and recent changes throughout the ground combat element:  
12-Marine Rifle Squad
One of the most anticipated changes Neller announced was the structure of the Marine rifle squad.  The new 12-Marine squad reflects changes aimed at better equipping the small unit leader with increased lethality and enhanced situational awareness.  It will be organized into three fire teams of three Marines each with two new positions added to account for an assistant squad leader and a squad systems operator.  Additional riflemen, one for each fire team, will remain on the books (Table of Organization) as an unmanned requirement to allow the Corps to quickly add depth to the squad, if needed. 
This new squad will be implemented across all Marine infantry battalions during the next three-to-five years. One of the key factors is that each squad leader would have 5-7 years of experience and formal training as a squad leader.  The new squad systems operator will also receive formal training on a variety of technologies.  The squad, by billet, will be organized as such:  
•           (1) Squad Leader (Sgt)
•           (1) Assistant Squad Leader (Cpl)
•           (1) Squad Systems Operator (Lance Cpl)
•           (3) Fire Team Leaders (Cpls)
•           (3) Grenadiers (Lance Cpls)
•           (3) Automatic Riflemen (Lance Cpls)
Squad Firepower, Comms, and Optics
Neller added that every Marine in the rifle squad will be armed with an M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle with suppressors and improved optics.  The current rifle squad is built around three automatic weapons, however, the future squad will have 12. Marines will also have improved binocular night-vision devices, improved optics, including a thermal capability, and multiple improved grenade launchers (M320). 
Marines are fielding the Multi-Role Anti-Armor Anti-Personnel Weapon System (MAAWS), “Carl Gustav”, as a replacement to the Mk-153 Shoulder-Launched Multipurpose Assault Weapon (SMAW), for additional firepower and increased rocket range and variety. 
They will receive enhanced communications equipment and the Marine Corps common handheld device that provides a digital link to close-air support, indirect fires, and adjacent units to increase shared situational awareness. 
Each squad will also have an M38 Squad Designated Marksmanship Rifle with a suppressor and variable 2.5-8 power optic.  This rifle is organizationally assigned to the rifle squad, not to a specific billet, to provide improved identification and engagement of targets out to 600 meters.  The individual employing this weapon will not be a sniper, but a Marine who is given additional training on range estimation, scope theory and observation.
Sniper Rifle Upgrades
Mk13 Mod 7 Long Range Sniper Rifle (LRSR).  The Marine Corps will field a limited number of Mk13 Mod 7 LRSRs during FY18 to provide increased range and hit probability.  The Mk13 Mod 7 LRSR is currently used by elements of U.S. Special Operations Command; it employs a .300 Winchester Magnum round.  
Unmanned Aerial Systems/Counter UAS
Each squad will have a UAS ‘quad copter’ to increase situational awareness of the squad leaders. Beyond the squads, each platoon will have an additional UAS operator, and the rifle companies will add a UAS/Counter-UAS section of five Marines.
More Javelins, Less TOWs and 81s…but Increased Range and Mobility
Weapons companies are going to get four additional Javelin systems bringing the total to 12.  Javelins are man-portable, anti-armor missiles; Javelins will have extended range with the command launch unit.  This is to off-set the elimination of four Tube-launched, Optically-tracked, Wire-guided (TOW) missiles in the company, and the eventual elimination of TOWs in the battalion.  The Commandant also announced the decision to reduce the number of 81 mm. mortar systems by two in each weapons company, as eight was a hold-over from days when we had four rifle companies in the battalion.  The six remaining will have extended ranges through ammunition improvements, and Marines will leverage the Polaris MRZRs (all-terrain vehicles) for enhanced mobility. 
More Tanks, Rockets
2nd Tank Battalion will get an additional tank company, and the Corps is upgrading its M1A1 active protection systems and target acquisition and sensor suites.
5th Bn, 10th Marines is coming back as a High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) Battalion, with plans to stand up this unit in FY23. 
Marines are fielding the Light Armored Vehicle Anti-Tank Modernization (LAV-ATM) upgrades – improved weapon systems, ability to acquire targets while on-the-move with a precision long-range anti-armor/anti-materiel capability, using an advanced thermal sight and guidance system.
More Information, Intel and Logistics
Each rifle company will have an Operations/Intelligence section, as well as a logistics cell and a Small Arms Repairer (Military Occupational Specialty designation 2111).  At the battalion level, Marines are adding an Information Management Officer and an Information Environment Operations Officer and Chief to integrate Information Warfare capabilities.
More Combat Engineers
Combat Engineer squads will increase to 13 Marines, and each infantry battalion will have an engineer platoon aligned to it. 
More FACs (Forward Air Controller)
With an additional FAC assigned to each infantry battalion, each rifle company will have an assigned FAC.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 20th, 2006, 8:29 pm

June 13th, 2018, 4:02 pm #2

ACSilver wrote:WASHINGTON , D.C. --
The Marines are making strides to become more lethal and agile based on the threats of the future battlefield.
Last week at the annual Ground Awards Dinner, Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Robert B. Neller, offered his recent decisions to many of the Corps’ top officer and enlisted ground combat leaders. 
.  .  . 
Reorganization of the infantry will occur over the next three-to-five years, although some of the changes are happening now, such as the move to arm infantry Marines with the M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle and the distribution of quadcopters.
Highlights of the announced and recent changes throughout the ground combat element:  
12-Marine Rifle Squad
One of the most anticipated changes Neller announced was the structure of the Marine rifle squad.  The new 12-Marine squad reflects changes aimed at better equipping the small unit leader with increased lethality and enhanced situational awareness.  It will be organized into three fire teams of three Marines each with two new positions added to account for an assistant squad leader and a squad systems operator.  Additional riflemen, one for each fire team, will remain on the books (Table of Organization) as an unmanned requirement to allow the Corps to quickly add depth to the squad, if needed. 
This new squad will be implemented across all Marine infantry battalions during the next three-to-five years. One of the key factors is that each squad leader would have 5-7 years of experience and formal training as a squad leader.  The new squad systems operator will also receive formal training on a variety of technologies.  The squad, by billet, will be organized as such:  
•           (1) Squad Leader (Sgt)
•           (1) Assistant Squad Leader (Cpl)
•           (1) Squad Systems Operator (Lance Cpl)
•           (3) Fire Team Leaders (Cpls)
•           (3) Grenadiers (Lance Cpls)
•           (3) Automatic Riflemen (Lance Cpls)
Squad Firepower, Comms, and Optics
Neller added that every Marine in the rifle squad will be armed with an M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle with suppressors and improved optics.  The current rifle squad is built around three automatic weapons, however, the future squad will have 12. Marines will also have improved binocular night-vision devices, improved optics, including a thermal capability, and multiple improved grenade launchers (M320).
.  .  . 
Each squad will also have an M-38Squad Designated Marksmanship Rifle with a suppressor and variable 2.5-8 power optic.  This rifle is organizationally assigned to the rifle squad, not to a specific billet, to provide improved identification and engagement of targets out to 600 meters.  The individual employing this weapon will not be a sniper, but a Marine who is given additional training on range estimation, scope theory and observation.
Sniper Rifle Upgrades
Mk13 Mod 7 Long Range Sniper Rifle (LRSR).  The Marine Corps will field a limited number of Mk13 Mod 7 LRSRs during FY18 to provide increased range and hit probability.  The Mk13 Mod 7 LRSR is currently used by elements of U.S. Special Operations Command; it employs a .300 Winchester Magnum round.  
.   .   .
More Combat Engineers
Combat Engineer squads will increase to 13 Marines, and each infantry battalion will have an engineer platoon aligned to it. 
More FACs (Forward Air Controller)
With an additional FAC assigned to each infantry battalion, each rifle company will have an assigned FAC.
I'm no infantryman, although there was a long time ago when I spent some time, quite against my will I might add,
making myself very useful as a FAC and a lot less useful with an M-16, M-60 and M-2.  
So I found ACSilver's article mildly interesting.  My problem is I never even heard of the M-27, M-38 or the M-13.

This being a "hurry up and wait" work instead of sailing day. 
I used up some of my "Wait" time and found these articles but have no way to evaluate the accuracy of them. 

I'm sure there are plenty of folk here who could remedy my ignorance?

Why Marines Absolutely Love the M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle
By Kyle Mizokami, The National Interest on December 7, 2017

The adoption of the M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle over the older M249 Squad Automatic Weapon marks a return to that ethos across the service at the small unit level. More accurate and capable of accomplishing its mission with fewer expended rounds, the M27 is now being considered as the front-line rifle not only for a handful of squad members but across the Corps’ front line units.

The Marine Corps, accustomed to heavy losses against strong enemy defenses and beach assaults, maintains robust, thirteen-man infantry squads. These squads further divide into three fire teams led by a single squad leader, each of which has two riflemen, a grenadier, and an automatic rifleman. Compared to a nine-man U.S. Army infantry squad, the Marine squad has four more personnel and a third rifle team. The result is increased flexibility and more tactical options for the squad leader.

For decades the fire team automatic rifleman has been equipped with the M249 Squad Automatic Weapon. Originally developed by Fabrique Nationale as the MINIMI, the M249 was capable of laying down a large volume of fire, up to 900 rounds per minute, using 200 round belt-fed packs of ammunition. This made the M249 useful for suppressive fire, keeping the enemy’s head down while other fire teams closed with the enemy. The M249 was a Marine Corps staple through the 9/11 era.

As useful as the M249 was, it did have problems. A 2006 report conducted by the CNA Corporation found that among U.S. Army combat veterans, the M249 scored below average in third place (after the M16 rifle and M4 carbine, but generally ahead of the M9 pistol) in handling, accuracy, maintainability and corrosion resistance. Nearly 30 percent of troops issued the M249 reported experiencing a stoppage in contact with the enemy, and 35 percent expressed a lack of confidence in weapon reliability. Although a U.S. Army study, the weapons involved in the study were identical to those issued at the time by the U.S. Marines.

The most glaring problem with the M249: it was never a good institutional fit for the Marine Corps. Although the weapon could hose down an enemy position with fire it wasn’t particularly useful for accurately engaging individual targets. The increase in ammo consumption meant an increase in carried ammunition weight. Ammunition consumption went up, the weight of carried ammunition went up, and accuracy went down—not an ideal situation for infantry.

In 2010, the Marines introduced the M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle (IAR). The IAR is based on the Heckler and Koch 416 rifle, which outwardly is very similar to the M4 carbine. Unlike the M4 carbine, the M27 uses the gas piston operating system, which uses a piston to drive the bolt. Instead of recycling hot, dirty propellent gases to cycle the weapon the M27 vents them, resulting in a cooler running, cleaner running, if slightly front-heavy rifle.

The M27 differs in other ways. The rifle barrel is slightly longer and heavier than the M4 carbine, giving the M27 a slight range advantage over the carbine. The thicker M27 barrel can fire longer than the M4 before overheating, but will also disperse heat longer. The M27 is also much lighter, weighing nearly ten pounds fully loaded, versus twenty-two pounds fully loaded for the M249 Squad Automatic Weapon. This is an appreciable difference during long periods of carrying the weapon.

The main difference between the M27 and M249 Squad Automatic Weapon, however, is accuracy. The M249 is first and foremost a machine gun and is accurate to about twelve minutes of angle, meaning rounds will hit within a foot of their target at 100 yards. The M27, on the other hand, is approximately a two minute of angle weapon, meaning it will land rounds within two inches of the target at 100 yards. In the hands of a trained automatic rifleman, this scales upward, so the M27 will deliver rounds within twelve inches of the target at 600 yards.

Other factors further improve the M27’s accuracy. The weapon features a Harris folding bipod, giving it a stable shooting position while prone or from behind cover. It also features a Trijicon ACOG Squad Day Optic, which sports 3.5 power magnification and allows target identification and precision fire out to distances of up to 600 yards. The ACOG also incorporates a rugged miniaturized reflex (RMR) sight for close quarters shooting at 100 yards or less.

The M27 is described by marines in the field as “two weapons in one”: a rifle capable of precision fire to eliminate individual targets but also capable of providing area suppression fire, like a SAW, if necessary. The difference is that the improved accuracy of the M27 leads to the need to fire fewer rounds to suppress a target, and less ammunition consumption in general. By contrast, the M249 it replaces is primarily an area suppression fire weapon with no precision fire capability.

The M27 has become so well-liked in August 2017 the Marine Corps issued an intent notice to procure another 50,000 rifles—enough to equip every infantryman and automatic rifleman in front-line combat units. Such an upgrade would give the Marine Corps an impressive boost in aimed firepower and mark a return to the Corps’ tradition of marksmanship.

Marines Set to Field New Designated Marksman Rifle
Designated marksmen are the best shots in a unit but not quite snipers.
By Kyle Mizokami  Apr 30, 2018 

Amidst a slew of new equipment coming down the pipeline for U.S. Marines is a new designated marksman rifle. The M38 scoped rifle is designed to give Marine infantry squads the ability to hit individual targets at ranges of up to 600 meters with greater precision than Marines equipped with ordinary M4 carbines. According to Marine Corps Times the rifle will be fully issued by September 2018.

After 9/11, the U.S. Army and Marines saw a need for a rifle that could reach out and hit targets at a greater distance than the typical M4 carbine or M16A2/A4 rifle could manage. Typically, such a rifle would be equipped with a long range telescopic sight bipod, and ideally have some work done by military armorers to increase accuracy. The U.S. Marines created a designated marksman position to carry the rifle and used a variety of designated marksman rifles (DMRs) including the M39 Enhanced Marksman Rifle and the Mark 12 Special Purpose Rifle.
Soldiers and Marines called designated marksmen typically earn that title by being the best shots in their squad or platoon. Designated marksmen received instruction in shooting farther than the average rifleman, particularly the means to negate the effects of gravity and wind on a 5.56-millimeter bullet. Despite this designated marksmen are still riflemen at heart and train to shoot shorter distances than snipers.

ow the Marines are preparing to field a new DMR, the M38 Squad Designated Marksman Rifle. The M38 is basically a M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle with a Leupold TS-30A2 Mark 4 MR/T scope. The M38 shoots 5.56 rounds, the same as the Marines’ M16A4, M4, M249, and M27 rifles and takes the same thirty round magazine. It can technically shoot fully automatic but as a SDMR rifle, it will primarily shoot semi-auto. It is based on the Heckler and Koch 416 assault rifle and equipped with a 16.5-inch barrel.

The TS-30A2 Mark 4 MR/T scope was formerly on the Mk. 12 Special Purpose Rifle. It has a magnification range of 2.5 to 8 power and at full magnification has a field of view of 13.6 feet. It is waterproof, fogproof, and shockproof. The TS-30A2 is a second focal plane optic, which means the scope reticle will appear the same size no matter what power the scope is dialed to.

The Marine Corps Times says that the M38 SDMR has been issued to all three Marine Expeditionary Forces. The M38 will be issued at a rate of one per thirteen man Marines infantry squad. In addition to the M38, the Marines are receiving a new sniper rifle and plan to equip regular infantry with 15,000 M27 automatic rifles.

The Mk 13 Mod 7 Will Be the Marines' New Sniper Rifle. Here Is What It Can Do.

The Marine Corps plans on adopting the Mk 13 Mod 7 sniper rifle for Marine scout snipers, officials confirmed to Marine Corps Times on April 2, a much-needed and long-overdue replacement for the M40 system that Marines have wielded since the Vietnam War.

Since the start of the Global War on Terror in 2001, the M40’s 1000-yard range has proved limiting for U.S. combat troops engaging militants in sprawling fightings in the mountains and desert of Afghanistan and Iraq. But according to Marine Corps Times, the Mk 13 “pushes beyond 1,000 yards” offered with a .300 Winchester Magnum round.

Task and PurposeJared Keller
April 7, 2018
TweetShareShare

The Marine Corps plans on adopting the Mk 13 Mod 7 sniper rifle for Marine scout snipers, officials confirmed to Marine Corps Times on April 2, a much-needed and long-overdue replacement for the M40 system that Marines have wielded since the Vietnam War.
Since the start of the Global War on Terror in 2001, the M40’s 1000-yard range has proved limiting for U.S. combat troops engaging militants in sprawling fightings in the mountains and desert of Afghanistan and Iraq. But according to Marine Corps Times, the Mk 13 “pushes beyond 1,000 yards” offered with a .300 Winchester Magnum round.
That range is nowhere near that of the Army’s 1,300-yard M2010 Enhanced Sniper Rifle and U.S. Special Operations Command’s 1,600-yard Precision Sniper Rifle. But it’s a major boost to both range and lethality over the M40, improvements that infantry weapons planners have sought for years.
The announcement comes amid a major makeover for the Corps’ precision weapon capabilities. In January, the Corps was testing the M38 variant of the beloved M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle for potential fielding in a squad designated marksman role.
And as Task & Purpose reported in February, the branch’s $40.8 billion proposed fiscal 2019 budget includes just under $1 million for the service to procure 116 7.62mm M110A1 Compact Semi-Automatic Sniper Systems (CSASS) to replace the M110 to “improve the sniper’s ability to rapidly engage multiple, moving targets.”

Task and PurposeJared Keller
April 7, 2018
TweetShareShare

The Marine Corps plans on adopting the Mk 13 Mod 7 sniper rifle for Marine scout snipers, officials confirmed to Marine Corps Times on April 2, a much-needed and long-overdue replacement for the M40 system that Marines have wielded since the Vietnam War.
Since the start of the Global War on Terror in 2001, the M40’s 1000-yard range has proved limiting for U.S. combat troops engaging militants in sprawling fightings in the mountains and desert of Afghanistan and Iraq. But according to Marine Corps Times, the Mk 13 “pushes beyond 1,000 yards” offered with a .300 Winchester Magnum round.

That range is nowhere near that of the Army’s 1,300-yard M2010 Enhanced Sniper Rifle and U.S. Special Operations Command’s 1,600-yard Precision Sniper Rifle. But it’s a major boost to both range and lethality over the M40, improvements that infantry weapons planners have sought for years.

The announcement comes amid a major makeover for the Corps’ precision weapon capabilities. In January, the Corps was testing the M38 variant of the beloved M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle for potential fielding in a squad designated marksman role.
And as Task & Purpose reported in February, the branch’s $40.8 billion proposed fiscal 2019 budget includes just under $1 million for the service to procure 116 7.62mm M110A1 Compact Semi-Automatic Sniper Systems (CSASS) to replace the M110 to “improve the sniper’s ability to rapidly engage multiple, moving targets.”

At the time, the Corps emphasized that the CSASS, favored by the Army for a squad designated marksman role, would not dislodge the M40 as the service’s program of record. And with good reason: With a maximum effective range of just 875 yards, the rifle doesn’t offer the extended range Marines have been kvetching about for years.

“Should leadership decide to conduct a one-for-one replacement or just buy them to replace M110s for sniper billets,” Marine Corps Systems Command told Task & Purpose at the time, “the quantity would be greater than 116.” 

Indeed, the Mk 13 appears to be the Corps’ final choice for that one-to-one replacement: While there’s no new explicit funding for the Mk 13 in the services’ fiscal 2019 budget request, the service asked for nearly $4.3 million in 2018 to purchase the new system, a quantity Marine Corps Times suggests is suitable to outfit the branch’s sniper teams with the new rifle. Indeed, the Corps noted that $5.3 million of its $40 million request for weapons and combat vehicles under $5 million “supports the MK 13 Rifle with associated optic … as well as continuing product improvement and modernization of sniper and special purpose weapons.”

How and when the service plans on fielding its new suite of precision weapons, like every other new piece of gear in the U.S. armed forces, remains to be seen. But no matter when it reaches Marine scout snipers, the new rifle represents a major, long-awaited breakthrough for the Corps — and certain doom for their adversaries downrange.

Jared Keller is a senior editor at Task & Purpose and contributing editor at Pacific Standard.











 
"If you think they’re going to give you THEIR country back without a fight, you are sadly mistaken.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 8th, 2007, 8:30 pm

June 13th, 2018, 4:23 pm #3

For a general overview of such things I find the strategy page a good source.  Here's there write up on the issue:
https://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htinf ... 80609.aspx
Quote
Like
Share

jua
Joined: March 17th, 2005, 3:54 am

June 13th, 2018, 5:35 pm #4

I have a question specifically concerning the DMR - is a assigned to a specific soldier? Best shot in the squad? Or is a weapon room kind thing where everyone gets M27 and the DMR gets assigned as needed?
Cheers,
Josh

https://squidjigger.com
Josh@squidjigger.com
twitter: @squid_jigger
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 27th, 2011, 9:14 pm

June 13th, 2018, 10:19 pm #5

It's been written that the DMR will be assigned to a squad member, who will get specialist training in scope theory and range estimation. So, one guy will probably routinely take the DMR out of the armory for training or combat, while his assigned M27 only sees the light of day for annual rifle qualification. Maybe an alternate marksman trains with the DMR part of the time.

Now here's the problem -- nothing in the Marine Corps stays in one place for long. New guys come in, old guys go out. Marines get promoted into leadership positions, where they shouldn't be as tunnel vision focussed as a marksman. So you have to figure that they're going to be constantly sending troops to designated marksman school, probably one per squad per year, and the DMR is going to pass from one guy to the next pretty regularly. But somebody will always be the man with the hat, and he'll have the DMR when he's out in the field, whether it's training or combat.
Up and forward on the starboard side, down and aft on the port. 

The question of authority stalks the de-religionist project. (Paul Vander Klay)
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 14th, 2013, 4:04 pm

June 21st, 2018, 2:23 pm #6

The Marines shed some light on a subject Sergeante and I were talking about just the other day.  

Marine Corps' New 'Holy Grail' of ACVs: A Big Step Forward

With its decision to acquire the BAE Systems version of the Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV), the U.S. Marine Corps took a big step forward in building a force for the 21st Century. This is one in a series of procurement decisions that puts the Marine Corps at the forefront of multi-domain warfare. -snip-

https://www.realcleardefense.com/articl ... 13550.html
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 24th, 2007, 11:14 pm

Yesterday, 3:17 am #7

So what makes a "LCpl" in the Marines?

It's not a term you would normally associate with US military forces.

In British and Commonwealth terms a Lance Corporal is someone who is fully qualified for Corporal and actually has discipline duties and privileges, ie., they can put someone on a charge.
You can lead a leftard to knowledge, but you can't make them think
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: March 1st, 2005, 3:53 pm

Yesterday, 3:42 am #8

Larrikin22 wrote: So what makes a "LCpl" in the Marines?

It's not a term you would normally associate with US military forces.

In British and Commonwealth terms a Lance Corporal is someone who is fully qualified for Corporal and actually has discipline duties and privileges, ie., they can put someone on a charge.
It is the USMC equivalent of a US Army Private First Class (both are E3 in paygrade).
Of course, the USMC also has PFCs, they are E2s - just like the Army's Private Second Class (PV2).
Both also have a Private E1.

https://www.infoplease.com/us/military- ... tary-ranks

In the above, note that the USMC differentiates in name whether an NCO is in a technical or administrative/non-tech combat field for E-8 & E-9 (USMC MSgt & MGySgt are tech, 1Sgt & SgtMaj are admin) - the US Army also does that for E-8 and E-4 (Specialist & Corporal), but they further list a Cpl as an NCO while a Spec is still a plain "enlisted soldier" like PFCs, PV2s, & Pvts.
https://www.federalpay.org/military/army/ranks
There it is... the District of Columbia! You will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy. We must be cautious.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 13th, 2008, 10:19 pm

Yesterday, 6:37 am #9

LCpl might have been qualed Cpl in the past but no longer.
Potential JNCOs' cadres only qualify to LCPL (Learner Cpl) level now.  To get to full screw you need to pass another course which might be in house for some cap badges or might be external, like Section Commander's Battle Course (Junior Brecon) is for the Inf.
In the Inf the role of the LCPl is usually 2i/c of the section, commanding the fire team the screw doesn't, although the book hasn't caught up to practice yet.  In some cap badges he really is a Cpl's understudy / assistant like the book says.
"Be harmonious, enrich the soldiers, and scorn all other men"

"Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster himself."

"We take pride in the terminatory service we provide"
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 13th, 2008, 10:19 pm

Yesterday, 6:38 am #10

JNCO cadrs are the place to see really ambitious but dire soldiering, btw.
"Be harmonious, enrich the soldiers, and scorn all other men"

"Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster himself."

"We take pride in the terminatory service we provide"
Quote
Like
Share