VirtualAni
VirtualAni

October 30th, 2015, 11:59 pm #21

Raffi,

Hi, many thanks for the references. Much appreciated.

Dera Sor ("Red Church") is a local Kurdish name for the architectural ruins how being linked with the missing monastery of Yeghrdut. It was a proper toponym associated with the site in the past.

I will continue to look for further confirmation that the two places are one and the same. I say this as I was told by locals in the area that Yeghrdut was located somewhere in the vicinity of Zengok, marked on the map as Yorecik. It apparently overlooked the Aratsani river and was located on its southern shore. Below it was a suspension bridge spanning the width of the river, beyond which, on a hill, was a fortress, presumably that at Ulayu.

Looking at Zengok/Yorecik you can see a large number of ruins around Zengok, some of substantial size. However, I have no further knowledge on what these might represent, whether they be the remains of an Armenian monastery or the destroyed village of Zengok.

If not Yeghrdut, then was another monastery located here also.

I understand there were something like 30 monasteries in all on the plain of Mush, of which very little is known about any of them other than those of Surb Karapet and Surb Arakelots.

Andrew
Yorecik at 38°47'5.53"N 41°12'45.07"E - these look like modern abandoned buildings to me. Those ruins more to the northwest, closer to the river, were perhaps constructed to house workers when the railway tunnels were dug.

38°48'2.28"N 41°11'43.48"E on the other side of the river might be a fortification site. There are the foundations of a rectangular structure and also what might be castle walls.
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Davit
Davit

June 13th, 2016, 6:19 pm #22

Hi, I am trying to locate the exact position of a monastery called Yeghrdut or Erghduti that once existed on the southern edge of the plain of Mush, just south of the Eastern Euphrates.

Here is the Wikipedia entry.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yeghrdut_monastery>

The coordinates given in the Wiki entry take you to a hillside without any trace of a building structure or boundary wall.

Take a look: 38.7834°N 41.2590°E

I want to pin down the site better, so have ordered:

Hamazasp Oskean (or Oskian or Voskian), Taron-Turuberani vankere (The
Monasteries of Taron-Turuberan) Vienna: Mekhitarist Press, 1953

This apparently contains more information on the site.

The following Thierry reference also has more information:

Thierry J. M., Eastern Turkey, archeological journey of life, travel diaries "Monument", Yearbook 1, E., 1987.

However, I cannot find this title among his bibliography at:

http://www.acam-france.org/bibliographi ... jeanmichel

Any one out there able to lay their hands on either the Thierry reference or any better information on the monastery?

The Wiki coordinates fall to the west of the modern village of Gudumlu, although this was almost entirely destroyed in 1993, and residents there today are unaware of any nearby monastery ruins. I have tried also at another local village Kizilagac, a little to the east, asking the same question, with the same response. No monastery known nearby, other than the ruins of a so-called "Red Church" (dera sor) somewhere to the east of Kizilagac.

Kizilagac apparently derives its names from Kizilxac, meaning Red Cross, although why no one seems to know. Yet it does appear to suggest the presence of an Armenian church foundation.

An "Armenian" mill and dam exists on the Kizilagac stream a km or so south of the village, and this too is likely to have been connected to a monastery nearby.

Any help appreciated.

Andrew
Info on Yeghrdut monastery can also be found online on the National Repository website http://serials.flib.sci.am/openreader/T ... ntent.html), where Hamazasp Voskian's book "Monasteries of Taron-Turuberan" is posted http://serials.flib.sci.am/openreader/T ... 6/mode/2up). Go to page 91, chapter 16. Hope this helps.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

August 7th, 2016, 11:28 pm #23

Gobekli Tepe: Genesis of the Gods: The Temple of the Watchers and the Discovery of Eden. By Andrew Collins.

https://scontent-ord1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/ ... e=58262D9B

Thaddeus continued his journey, reaching Armenia in AD 43/45. At Yeghrdut, near Mush in historical Armenia ( eastern Turkey), he is said to have deposited a piece of the Tree of Life, as well as other important holy relics.

The remains of the Yeghrdut monastery, now known as Dera Sor (the Red Church), on the northern slopes of the Eastern Taurus Mountains of eastern Turkey. It was here that Thaddeus apparently deposited precious cache of holy relics.

Gobekli Tepe: Genesis of the Gods: The Temple of the Watchers and the Discovery of Eden. By Andrew Collins.
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VirtualAni
VirtualAni

August 13th, 2016, 2:27 am #24

http://www.andrewcollins.com/page/articles/EQ_0614.htm

Garden of Eden Tour

Clearly, there are many mysteries to be unravelled at Karahan Tepe, and it is something I intend spending time doing in the coming years. Hugh and I hopefully will return there in September as part of the Garden of Eden tour, which begins on September 1st. We would love you to join us out there.

Sites to be visited on the tour include Göbekli Tepe, Harran, Sanliurfa, Çayönü, Nemrut Dag (both of them), Sogmatar, the Armenian church of Akhtamar on Lake Van, the plain of Mush and Armenian Highlands, which include the best candidates by far for the site of the Garden of Eden, the Mountain of God, and Mount Hermon, the Place of Descent of the Watchers, as well as the Fountain of Paradise at the Alevi shrine of Muska (where al-Khidr and Alexander the Great are supposed to have gained immortality). We go also to the Eden Monastery at Yeghrdut, where the Armenian monks not only believed they occupied some quiet corner of Eden, but also possessed what they saw as a piece of the Tree of Life, as well as the container in which were the dregs of the terrestrial form of the Oil of Mercy said to ooze like sap from the Tree of Life. This precious oil could supposedly bestow immortality on any living thing that came into its presence, while a visit to the monastery itself could make a person younger by as much as twenty years, the reason why Moslems and Christians alike came here from all over the region to seek healing and rejuvenation. This incredible site, located on the slopes of the Eastern Taurus Mountains, overlooks the plain of Mush through which passes the River Euphrates, one of the four rivers of Paradise.

There is even a token source of the Euphrates at Yeghrdut, which once appeared from beneath an “evergreen” tree, where the above-mentioned artefacts were apparently found in the fourth century of the Christian era (I gave away small fragments of this tree with the special edition of Göbekli Tepe: Genesis of the Gods).
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