VirtualAni
VirtualAni

September 27th, 2012, 1:13 pm #11

That mini-house thing IS recent. It is probably another small example of the Armenian Church thinking it can do (and being allowed to do) whatever it wants with the historical monumets it was given after the fall of the Soviet Union.

Photos taken in the 1970s show that there was a similarly-shaped structure at that same location in the building. But its pedimented roof was orientated in a different direction (north-south rather than east-west), and it had a miniature stone church at its apex, similar to the miniature churches that are at the apex of the gables of the main church. So, the original structure there has been entirely destroyed for some reason and has been replaced by something which does not match the original.

As for what it could have been, it may have just been an architectural solution to hide a messy join between the roofs of the church and the gavit. Or maybe it could have been an reliquary of some sort. If the latter is the case, perhaps its north-south orientation did not fit with the dogma of the current Armenian Church, so they had it destroyed and replaced with something more acceptable to them.

I think this is the same reasoning behind the destruction of that 19th century roof at Harichavank and its replacement with an historically inaccurate conical roof. Armenian Church dogma says that this is what an Armenian church must look like (steeply-pitched conical roof with a cross at its apex, raised floor level in the apse, etc.) and inconvenient examples showing that this has not always been the case, that the Armenian Church might have changed over the centuries, are removed.
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VirtualAni
VirtualAni

September 27th, 2012, 1:19 pm #12

Those same photos from the 1970s show that above the north entrance to the Gavit, directly under the arched window, was an Armenian inscription. It looks a bit like an open book, with a long inscription on each of the two "pages". It is not there on that more recent photo.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

September 28th, 2012, 8:18 am #13

Come on now, there must be a good reason for removing that inscription ... they have to make room for a new inscription when someone adds eclectic marble stone to match those hideous walls outside to the inside of the church, or perhaps for whoever provides monastic cells with heating and insulation or perhaps gifts the Karabakhi Archbishop with a Rolex. The archbishop of Yerevan has a Bentley and a gun, the Catholicos a Patek Philippe watch - the least they could do for that guy... is give him something entry level, god forbid.

Can you recommend a book with older photos of the original you mentioned?

On a side note - went to see the newly rebuilt church at Parpi. Mismatching stone that was machine cut, with the stone ends and leftovers scattered nearby, and the original unused masonry (no attempt to re-incorporate it) lying around, and modern graves going up to wall of church itself. clearly it was never properly excavated either and broken pieces of pottery and bone littered the side.
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VirtualAni
VirtualAni

October 4th, 2012, 8:30 pm #14

My source for the old photos was just a Soviet-period leaflet on the monastery - it is dated 1991 but is probably a reprint. Its author is A. L. Jacobson who also wrote a 1960 book on Gandzazar so the photos may be from that earlier period. Volume 17, "Gandzazar", of the "Documents on Armenian Architecture" series of books is probably going to be the best source for pictures. There is a photo of the gavit door in a 1985 book by S. Mkrtchyan about the architectural monuments of Nagorno Karabakh - and the inscription is gone in that photo.
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VirtualAni
VirtualAni

December 13th, 2012, 11:53 pm #15

...prove that the persons with the worst taste in the world are always rich "businessmen"!



http://hetq.am/eng/news/2766/
TILING OF GANDZASAR MONASTERY'S WALLS HALTED
Sona Avagyan

hetq
July 8, 2011

Hetq has been informed that the questionable tiling of the walls of
the Gandzasar Monastery in Artskah has been halted.

The re-facing of the medieval monastery's walls had stirred up a
hornet's nest of contention in Artsakh and Armenia.

The retiling had been the brainchild of Russian-Armenian businessman
Levon Hayrapetyan.

It appears that once Artsakh Primate Archbishop Barkev Martirosyan
had been informed of what was happening, he immediately returned to
Gandzasar from Yerevan.

Also see:

http://hetq.am/eng/news/2718/
Gandzasar Fiasco: Who is Responsible for Monastery Defacement?

hetq
July 7, 2011

The accompanying photo showing polished facing tiles being affixed to the outer walls of the 13th century Gandzasar Monastery in Artsakh has created a growing furor in Armenia.

The "brain" behind the move belongs to wealthy Russian-Armenian businessman and benefactor Levon Hayrapetyan who hails from Karabakh.

We dare say that concerned Armenians overseas have been shocked as well at this nonsensical defacement of our cultural and historical monuments.

The story broke when a youth group calling itself "We Will Not Remain Silent" sent this and other photos to the press. The story was quickly picked up by the papers and news sites.

Quick to react to the mounting criticism of such architectural shenanigans was Slava Sargsyan, head of the Division of Monuments Preservation and Research at the NKR Department of Tourism.

Mr. Sargsyan passed the buck to Hayrapetyan, claiming that his state agency hadn't issued any permission to resurface the monastery walls.

The youth group, at a press conference yesterday, said that it had petitioned Hayrapetyan to stop further defacement of the monument, adding that the businessman probably wasn't aware of what was actually being done in his name.

The group was able to contact Hayrapetyan by phone. The businessman told them that the walls being resurfaced were built in the 1980s and not the 13th century and that they were in need of urgent repair.

He also claimed that the tiles were from the same stone quarry used to construct the monastery itself.

The youth group says that this contradicts what Slava Sargsyan, the Artsakh agency head, stated on numerous occasions in his press interviews, i.e., that the walls also date to the 13th century.

Archbishop Barkev Martirosyan, Primate of the Artsakh Diocese of the Armenian Church, has refrained from commenting on the matter.

The group says that rumours circulating in Artsakh point to the falling out between Archbishop Martirosyan and Levon Hayrapetyan as the main reason for the primate's silence.

The youth group argues that Archbishop Martirosyan has a personal interest in seeing the businessman's reputation tarnished.

They say that it appears that the Artsakh Primate and other high-ranking clergy are more interested in driving the latest foreign cars and being seen with well endowed woman than following the commandments of their Christian faith.

ARMENIAN ARCHITECTS COMPLAIN TO PRESIDENTS OF ARMENIA AND
NAGORNO-KARABAKH OF CONTINUED CONSTRUCTION AROUND GANDZASAR MONASTERY


arminfo
Thursday, December 6, 18:12

The Armenian Association of Architects Restoring Historical Monuments
has complained to Presidents of Armenia and Nagorno-Karabakh Serzh
Sargsyan and Bako Sahakyan of the continued cladding of the stonewall
around Gandzasar Monastery with marble slabs.

In their letter to the Presidents the architects demand that the
activities be stopped right away.

"Stopped in 2011, following the protests of experts, the project has
now been started again, which means that certain government officials
do not care for the opinion of experts," the architects say.

Located in the village of Vank, Nagorno-Karabakh, Gandzasar was the
residence and sepulture of the Hasan-Jalalyan family, the rulers of
the Princedom of Khachen. In XIV it was turned into the residence of
the Catholicos of Aghvanq. An inscription inside the monastery says
that it was built in 1216-1238.

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VirtualAni
VirtualAni

July 26th, 2014, 5:07 pm #16

...prove that the persons with the worst taste in the world are always rich "businessmen"!



http://hetq.am/eng/news/2766/
TILING OF GANDZASAR MONASTERY'S WALLS HALTED
Sona Avagyan

hetq
July 8, 2011

Hetq has been informed that the questionable tiling of the walls of
the Gandzasar Monastery in Artskah has been halted.

The re-facing of the medieval monastery's walls had stirred up a
hornet's nest of contention in Artsakh and Armenia.

The retiling had been the brainchild of Russian-Armenian businessman
Levon Hayrapetyan.

It appears that once Artsakh Primate Archbishop Barkev Martirosyan
had been informed of what was happening, he immediately returned to
Gandzasar from Yerevan.

Also see:

http://hetq.am/eng/news/2718/
Gandzasar Fiasco: Who is Responsible for Monastery Defacement?

hetq
July 7, 2011

The accompanying photo showing polished facing tiles being affixed to the outer walls of the 13th century Gandzasar Monastery in Artsakh has created a growing furor in Armenia.

The "brain" behind the move belongs to wealthy Russian-Armenian businessman and benefactor Levon Hayrapetyan who hails from Karabakh.

We dare say that concerned Armenians overseas have been shocked as well at this nonsensical defacement of our cultural and historical monuments.

The story broke when a youth group calling itself "We Will Not Remain Silent" sent this and other photos to the press. The story was quickly picked up by the papers and news sites.

Quick to react to the mounting criticism of such architectural shenanigans was Slava Sargsyan, head of the Division of Monuments Preservation and Research at the NKR Department of Tourism.

Mr. Sargsyan passed the buck to Hayrapetyan, claiming that his state agency hadn't issued any permission to resurface the monastery walls.

The youth group, at a press conference yesterday, said that it had petitioned Hayrapetyan to stop further defacement of the monument, adding that the businessman probably wasn't aware of what was actually being done in his name.

The group was able to contact Hayrapetyan by phone. The businessman told them that the walls being resurfaced were built in the 1980s and not the 13th century and that they were in need of urgent repair.

He also claimed that the tiles were from the same stone quarry used to construct the monastery itself.

The youth group says that this contradicts what Slava Sargsyan, the Artsakh agency head, stated on numerous occasions in his press interviews, i.e., that the walls also date to the 13th century.

Archbishop Barkev Martirosyan, Primate of the Artsakh Diocese of the Armenian Church, has refrained from commenting on the matter.

The group says that rumours circulating in Artsakh point to the falling out between Archbishop Martirosyan and Levon Hayrapetyan as the main reason for the primate's silence.

The youth group argues that Archbishop Martirosyan has a personal interest in seeing the businessman's reputation tarnished.

They say that it appears that the Artsakh Primate and other high-ranking clergy are more interested in driving the latest foreign cars and being seen with well endowed woman than following the commandments of their Christian faith.

Levon Hayrapetian is Nagorno-Karabakh's chief oligarch/criminal.


RFE/RL Armenia Report - 07/22/2014

Karabakh Lawmakers Call For Release Of Arrested Armenian Businessman

Lusine Musayelian
Astghik Bedevian
22.07.2014

Members of Nagorno-Karabakh's legislature have called for an immediate
release of an ethnic Armenian businessman who was arrested in Russia
last week on suspicion of having ties with an organized criminal
group.

All factions and groups of the self-proclaimed republic's 33-member
National Assembly on Tuesday issued a statement in which they
described Levon Hayrapetian, a native of Nagorno-Karabakh, as a great
patriot who has for years implemented numerous charity projects in his
homeland, contributing to its social and economic development.

"We are guided by the presumption of innocence, abstaining from
political evaluations," the Nagorno-Karabakh lawmakers emphasized. "We
consider that the body conducting the investigation should urgently
change the measure of restraint [used against Hayrapetian] and release
him, considering Hayrapetian's health problems."

The Karabakh politicians expressed their conviction that "as a
law-abiding citizen and a highly educated person, Levon Hayrapetian,
while being out of prison, will provide comprehensive assistance to
the investigation and will be useful in clarifying the issues of
interest to the Russian Investigative Committee."

They said they considered what happened to the Armenian businessman as
a `regrettable misunderstanding', expressing their conviction that
Russian law-enforcement bodies will be able to carry out an "objective
and comprehensive investigation that will prove Hayrapetian's
innocence".

Nagorno-Karabakh Prime Minister Ara Harutiunian also told reporters in
Stepanakert that they expect Hayrapetian to be released soon. He said
that Karabakh authorities are "dealing with the case" and expressed
his conviction that the businessman is not responsible for the crimes
he is accused of.

Hayrapetian, 65, was arrested by Russian Federal Security Service
officials on July 15. Last Thursday, a Moscow court allowed the
businessman's two-month imprisonment while investigators conduct a
probe into his alleged criminal connections and involvement in some
illegal financial dealings. Official charges against Hayrapetian are
expected to be brought on July 24.

Hayrapetian's case also elicited mixed reactions in Armenia and
Nagorno-Karabakh last week. While officials in Yerevan provided terse
comments and would not be drawn into speculations about any political
motives behind the arrest, some opposition figures, families and
friends of the businessman spoke openly about such a possibility.

Hayrapetian is considered to be one of the wealthiest Armenians in the
world. He is known to have invested millions of dollars into
developing Nagorno-Karabakh's infrastructure and renovating the area's
historical-cultural monuments. His charity included a mass wedding for
700 Karabakhi couples in 2008 and sponsorship of the construction of a
military college in Martakert.

Some of the businessman's friends, such as Major-General Arkady
Ter-Tadevosian, one of the Armenian commanders in the 1992-1994 war in
Nagorno-Karabakh nicknamed Komandos, have even alleged an `Azerbaijani
scheme' behind the arrest, saying that its aim is to harm
Nagorno-Karabakh and the Armenian-Russian relations.

Ter-Tadevosian, other retired military men as well as public figures
staged an action in support of Hayrapetian in Yerevan on Tuesday. They
said they believed that Russia's political leadership was not
connected with what they considered to be a case fabricated against
the Armenian businessman by Russian and Azerbaijani special services.

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VirtualAni
VirtualAni

October 19th, 2017, 11:33 pm #17

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