Timex Vintage Collection - Review of the Marlin

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 15th, 2001, 6:31 am #1


If you want the short review, it pretty much rocks!



I was wondering about this new line from Timex, as it had been mentioned here a few times. I wrote Timex recently, and got an pretty quick email back from Samantha, who told me that it was being sold through Target Department Stores, but not through their website. Well, today I visited Target, and sure enough, there they were.



The line is officially called the "Heritage Collection," and was in a cabinet display with a blowup of a vintage ad, featuring a stylyish woman wearing a watch in which the watch dangles, like a charm, from a wrist chain.

There were maybe fifteen different styles, men's and women's. Two were called "Marlin," about four called "Electric," one or two called "Catavina," a folding small watch/clock in a cushion case (two examples) called "Fairview," a PW called "Yankee," and several examples of the very small ladies watches with elaborate bands, from 50s.



The little folding box/watch was very sharp looking, about the size of a pillbox, but I was not sure what I'd do with it. The Electrics looked pretty good, but they didn't say "Electric" on the dial, only on the box, and this disapointed me a bit. There was one Electric with a cream colored dial, which I think was a pretty good attempt to re-create a vintage, evenly aged patina! Of course, all of these were quartz watches, the entire line.

Most seemed to be selling for 34.99 USD. The Marlin reproduction I bought was designed very carefully to be as close as possible to what is emerging as the "most famous" vintage men's Timex; one of the 1954 or 1955 versions of the original Marlin, with green luminous numbers painted on a brushed (aluminum?) dial, fine black borders around the luminous numbers, outer minute track in black and white, yellow-gold minute and seconds hands, spindle-shaped red seconds, and lest we forget, "Waterproof" above the six, in red. This repro dial is very very close, and I give a lot of credit to the designer. Even the metal of the dial has the same straight brushed fine lines, of the original, which I thought was very impressive.

Sure, I'd love to have had the "Waterproof" designation, but I'd think even for a vintage repro, they would run into trouble if they'd printed it. The Timex logo is slightly different, and the seconds hand is stock parts, not specialty made in the beautiful spindle shape, with almost a diamond shaped counterweight. But these are the comments of a self-described vintage Timex fan, so I am going to be be critical. The size is pretty much identical to the original, the designers resisting, possibly, an urge to make a larger version. The case is in the same style, and in keeping with the original is plated metal, rather than steel. The crown, like most quartz crowns is not very substantial, not like the larger crown on the original, but it's not tiny either.

The watch came in a period-looking plastic clamshell case, lined by satiny type cloth, with "Timex Marlin." Unlike most watches sold today, it is displayed "laying down" in the case. Each open case takes up a lot more room than the cases of most other watches you see for sale, and the window display was appealing.

The only real complaint was the strap. It does have the same type of stamped buckle from that time period, though in steel, with the single fixed loop for the free end. It is leather, but it's not a real quality strap, either in the quality of the leather, or the construction. But for 34.99, I guess I can't complain.

See some more pictures below. All in all, I love the look of this watch. For a vintage line, I think Timex did a pretty good job. I think they kept it as authentic as possible. Can I deal with the quartz? I am still not sure, I might not, but we'll see.

Let me know what you think? I wonder how the line will do. It might be a test market, the Target stores. Interesting they came out with the line, actually. They must have gotten wind of the fact that some people are interested in vintage Timex watches...



Last edited by alantimex on May 1st, 2003, 5:02 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Tony
Tony

November 16th, 2001, 1:12 am #2

Size?
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owen
owen

November 17th, 2001, 12:52 am #3


If you want the short review, it pretty much rocks!



I was wondering about this new line from Timex, as it had been mentioned here a few times. I wrote Timex recently, and got an pretty quick email back from Samantha, who told me that it was being sold through Target Department Stores, but not through their website. Well, today I visited Target, and sure enough, there they were.



The line is officially called the "Heritage Collection," and was in a cabinet display with a blowup of a vintage ad, featuring a stylyish woman wearing a watch in which the watch dangles, like a charm, from a wrist chain.

There were maybe fifteen different styles, men's and women's. Two were called "Marlin," about four called "Electric," one or two called "Catavina," a folding small watch/clock in a cushion case (two examples) called "Fairview," a PW called "Yankee," and several examples of the very small ladies watches with elaborate bands, from 50s.



The little folding box/watch was very sharp looking, about the size of a pillbox, but I was not sure what I'd do with it. The Electrics looked pretty good, but they didn't say "Electric" on the dial, only on the box, and this disapointed me a bit. There was one Electric with a cream colored dial, which I think was a pretty good attempt to re-create a vintage, evenly aged patina! Of course, all of these were quartz watches, the entire line.

Most seemed to be selling for 34.99 USD. The Marlin reproduction I bought was designed very carefully to be as close as possible to what is emerging as the "most famous" vintage men's Timex; one of the 1954 or 1955 versions of the original Marlin, with green luminous numbers painted on a brushed (aluminum?) dial, fine black borders around the luminous numbers, outer minute track in black and white, yellow-gold minute and seconds hands, spindle-shaped red seconds, and lest we forget, "Waterproof" above the six, in red. This repro dial is very very close, and I give a lot of credit to the designer. Even the metal of the dial has the same straight brushed fine lines, of the original, which I thought was very impressive.

Sure, I'd love to have had the "Waterproof" designation, but I'd think even for a vintage repro, they would run into trouble if they'd printed it. The Timex logo is slightly different, and the seconds hand is stock parts, not specialty made in the beautiful spindle shape, with almost a diamond shaped counterweight. But these are the comments of a self-described vintage Timex fan, so I am going to be be critical. The size is pretty much identical to the original, the designers resisting, possibly, an urge to make a larger version. The case is in the same style, and in keeping with the original is plated metal, rather than steel. The crown, like most quartz crowns is not very substantial, not like the larger crown on the original, but it's not tiny either.

The watch came in a period-looking plastic clamshell case, lined by satiny type cloth, with "Timex Marlin." Unlike most watches sold today, it is displayed "laying down" in the case. Each open case takes up a lot more room than the cases of most other watches you see for sale, and the window display was appealing.

The only real complaint was the strap. It does have the same type of stamped buckle from that time period, though in steel, with the single fixed loop for the free end. It is leather, but it's not a real quality strap, either in the quality of the leather, or the construction. But for 34.99, I guess I can't complain.

See some more pictures below. All in all, I love the look of this watch. For a vintage line, I think Timex did a pretty good job. I think they kept it as authentic as possible. Can I deal with the quartz? I am still not sure, I might not, but we'll see.

Let me know what you think? I wonder how the line will do. It might be a test market, the Target stores. Interesting they came out with the line, actually. They must have gotten wind of the fact that some people are interested in vintage Timex watches...


What's the serial number Alan? I'm just curious what year it was built since Timex isn't listing them on the website. Might be an explanation (or mystery) there of the Target marketing. ..I imagine these would go rather well at an Eddie Bauer; they've got the clientel of the right age group.

Very nice watch and box. Hope to see the full line up here.

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Alan N.
Alan N.

November 17th, 2001, 5:01 am #4

Hi Owen. From Samantha, at Timex:

From: Custserv LR [[url=mailto:custserv@timex.com]custserv@timex.com[/url]]
Sent: Tuesday, November 06, 2001 12:21 PM
To: Alan N.
Subject: RE: Timex "Vintage Line"

Thank you for your interest. The ‘retro’ watches are currently only at Target stores. Unfortunately I do not have any pictures to email yet.
------
I asked it they were for sale on the internet, and she replied:

From: Custserv LR [[url=mailto:custserv@timex.com]custserv@timex.com[/url]]
Sent: Thursday, November 08, 2001 8:49 AM
To: Alan N.
Subject: RE: Timex "Vintage Line"

I haven't heard any plans yet. If we do eventually have them available they should be on the website.
----------------

I'm not sure what this means, "If we do eventually have them available..." In fact, I would think that anyone who has much interest in vintage Timex, must be on the internet, and I think they'd sell a lot of watches from their website, if they were available. The best explanation I can come up with it, is that Target is a well established retailer of Timex products, and this is sort of a test market, to see if it flies. It's been suggested by Bill who posts here, that the line might do well in Japan, as they are very much into vintage repros of all kinds of watches, and might be into an "American classic." I hadn't thought about that, but I think he's right.

I doubt that the answers will be forthcoming anytime soon. I don't think companies like to make public their marketing strategies, and Timex, as a corporation, apparently has put the "P" in private. It's been said that they never even released production / sales numbers per year, only "Sold more than any other watch in the world," or something like that!

The Timex mystery is something that keeps the collecting interest alive!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 17th, 2001, 5:10 pm #5

Size?
as the one your wife wears. I guess they could have made it larger, maybe the larger size of the Electrics, but might have felt like less of a faithful repro.
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dan
dan

July 15th, 2002, 12:33 am #6


If you want the short review, it pretty much rocks!



I was wondering about this new line from Timex, as it had been mentioned here a few times. I wrote Timex recently, and got an pretty quick email back from Samantha, who told me that it was being sold through Target Department Stores, but not through their website. Well, today I visited Target, and sure enough, there they were.



The line is officially called the "Heritage Collection," and was in a cabinet display with a blowup of a vintage ad, featuring a stylyish woman wearing a watch in which the watch dangles, like a charm, from a wrist chain.

There were maybe fifteen different styles, men's and women's. Two were called "Marlin," about four called "Electric," one or two called "Catavina," a folding small watch/clock in a cushion case (two examples) called "Fairview," a PW called "Yankee," and several examples of the very small ladies watches with elaborate bands, from 50s.



The little folding box/watch was very sharp looking, about the size of a pillbox, but I was not sure what I'd do with it. The Electrics looked pretty good, but they didn't say "Electric" on the dial, only on the box, and this disapointed me a bit. There was one Electric with a cream colored dial, which I think was a pretty good attempt to re-create a vintage, evenly aged patina! Of course, all of these were quartz watches, the entire line.

Most seemed to be selling for 34.99 USD. The Marlin reproduction I bought was designed very carefully to be as close as possible to what is emerging as the "most famous" vintage men's Timex; one of the 1954 or 1955 versions of the original Marlin, with green luminous numbers painted on a brushed (aluminum?) dial, fine black borders around the luminous numbers, outer minute track in black and white, yellow-gold minute and seconds hands, spindle-shaped red seconds, and lest we forget, "Waterproof" above the six, in red. This repro dial is very very close, and I give a lot of credit to the designer. Even the metal of the dial has the same straight brushed fine lines, of the original, which I thought was very impressive.

Sure, I'd love to have had the "Waterproof" designation, but I'd think even for a vintage repro, they would run into trouble if they'd printed it. The Timex logo is slightly different, and the seconds hand is stock parts, not specialty made in the beautiful spindle shape, with almost a diamond shaped counterweight. But these are the comments of a self-described vintage Timex fan, so I am going to be be critical. The size is pretty much identical to the original, the designers resisting, possibly, an urge to make a larger version. The case is in the same style, and in keeping with the original is plated metal, rather than steel. The crown, like most quartz crowns is not very substantial, not like the larger crown on the original, but it's not tiny either.

The watch came in a period-looking plastic clamshell case, lined by satiny type cloth, with "Timex Marlin." Unlike most watches sold today, it is displayed "laying down" in the case. Each open case takes up a lot more room than the cases of most other watches you see for sale, and the window display was appealing.

The only real complaint was the strap. It does have the same type of stamped buckle from that time period, though in steel, with the single fixed loop for the free end. It is leather, but it's not a real quality strap, either in the quality of the leather, or the construction. But for 34.99, I guess I can't complain.

See some more pictures below. All in all, I love the look of this watch. For a vintage line, I think Timex did a pretty good job. I think they kept it as authentic as possible. Can I deal with the quartz? I am still not sure, I might not, but we'll see.

Let me know what you think? I wonder how the line will do. It might be a test market, the Target stores. Interesting they came out with the line, actually. They must have gotten wind of the fact that some people are interested in vintage Timex watches...


Are these watches still available at Target stores? I haven't seen the Heritage collection at my local Target and I was wondering if they are still selling them.
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Martin Manhart
Martin Manhart

November 16th, 2002, 12:06 am #7


If you want the short review, it pretty much rocks!



I was wondering about this new line from Timex, as it had been mentioned here a few times. I wrote Timex recently, and got an pretty quick email back from Samantha, who told me that it was being sold through Target Department Stores, but not through their website. Well, today I visited Target, and sure enough, there they were.



The line is officially called the "Heritage Collection," and was in a cabinet display with a blowup of a vintage ad, featuring a stylyish woman wearing a watch in which the watch dangles, like a charm, from a wrist chain.

There were maybe fifteen different styles, men's and women's. Two were called "Marlin," about four called "Electric," one or two called "Catavina," a folding small watch/clock in a cushion case (two examples) called "Fairview," a PW called "Yankee," and several examples of the very small ladies watches with elaborate bands, from 50s.



The little folding box/watch was very sharp looking, about the size of a pillbox, but I was not sure what I'd do with it. The Electrics looked pretty good, but they didn't say "Electric" on the dial, only on the box, and this disapointed me a bit. There was one Electric with a cream colored dial, which I think was a pretty good attempt to re-create a vintage, evenly aged patina! Of course, all of these were quartz watches, the entire line.

Most seemed to be selling for 34.99 USD. The Marlin reproduction I bought was designed very carefully to be as close as possible to what is emerging as the "most famous" vintage men's Timex; one of the 1954 or 1955 versions of the original Marlin, with green luminous numbers painted on a brushed (aluminum?) dial, fine black borders around the luminous numbers, outer minute track in black and white, yellow-gold minute and seconds hands, spindle-shaped red seconds, and lest we forget, "Waterproof" above the six, in red. This repro dial is very very close, and I give a lot of credit to the designer. Even the metal of the dial has the same straight brushed fine lines, of the original, which I thought was very impressive.

Sure, I'd love to have had the "Waterproof" designation, but I'd think even for a vintage repro, they would run into trouble if they'd printed it. The Timex logo is slightly different, and the seconds hand is stock parts, not specialty made in the beautiful spindle shape, with almost a diamond shaped counterweight. But these are the comments of a self-described vintage Timex fan, so I am going to be be critical. The size is pretty much identical to the original, the designers resisting, possibly, an urge to make a larger version. The case is in the same style, and in keeping with the original is plated metal, rather than steel. The crown, like most quartz crowns is not very substantial, not like the larger crown on the original, but it's not tiny either.

The watch came in a period-looking plastic clamshell case, lined by satiny type cloth, with "Timex Marlin." Unlike most watches sold today, it is displayed "laying down" in the case. Each open case takes up a lot more room than the cases of most other watches you see for sale, and the window display was appealing.

The only real complaint was the strap. It does have the same type of stamped buckle from that time period, though in steel, with the single fixed loop for the free end. It is leather, but it's not a real quality strap, either in the quality of the leather, or the construction. But for 34.99, I guess I can't complain.

See some more pictures below. All in all, I love the look of this watch. For a vintage line, I think Timex did a pretty good job. I think they kept it as authentic as possible. Can I deal with the quartz? I am still not sure, I might not, but we'll see.

Let me know what you think? I wonder how the line will do. It might be a test market, the Target stores. Interesting they came out with the line, actually. They must have gotten wind of the fact that some people are interested in vintage Timex watches...


I'm with you brother! I LOVE vintage Timex watches of all flavors. I REALLY love the Marlin watch you show on your site. I'd love to get ahold of an original, but would also settle for one of these remakes. Do you know if Timex has them in all of their regional markets? I'm a military watch nut as well and would love to have a Marlin for my collection. Can't wait to hear from you.........
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Martin Manhart
Martin Manhart

November 18th, 2002, 10:30 pm #8


If you want the short review, it pretty much rocks!



I was wondering about this new line from Timex, as it had been mentioned here a few times. I wrote Timex recently, and got an pretty quick email back from Samantha, who told me that it was being sold through Target Department Stores, but not through their website. Well, today I visited Target, and sure enough, there they were.



The line is officially called the "Heritage Collection," and was in a cabinet display with a blowup of a vintage ad, featuring a stylyish woman wearing a watch in which the watch dangles, like a charm, from a wrist chain.

There were maybe fifteen different styles, men's and women's. Two were called "Marlin," about four called "Electric," one or two called "Catavina," a folding small watch/clock in a cushion case (two examples) called "Fairview," a PW called "Yankee," and several examples of the very small ladies watches with elaborate bands, from 50s.



The little folding box/watch was very sharp looking, about the size of a pillbox, but I was not sure what I'd do with it. The Electrics looked pretty good, but they didn't say "Electric" on the dial, only on the box, and this disapointed me a bit. There was one Electric with a cream colored dial, which I think was a pretty good attempt to re-create a vintage, evenly aged patina! Of course, all of these were quartz watches, the entire line.

Most seemed to be selling for 34.99 USD. The Marlin reproduction I bought was designed very carefully to be as close as possible to what is emerging as the "most famous" vintage men's Timex; one of the 1954 or 1955 versions of the original Marlin, with green luminous numbers painted on a brushed (aluminum?) dial, fine black borders around the luminous numbers, outer minute track in black and white, yellow-gold minute and seconds hands, spindle-shaped red seconds, and lest we forget, "Waterproof" above the six, in red. This repro dial is very very close, and I give a lot of credit to the designer. Even the metal of the dial has the same straight brushed fine lines, of the original, which I thought was very impressive.

Sure, I'd love to have had the "Waterproof" designation, but I'd think even for a vintage repro, they would run into trouble if they'd printed it. The Timex logo is slightly different, and the seconds hand is stock parts, not specialty made in the beautiful spindle shape, with almost a diamond shaped counterweight. But these are the comments of a self-described vintage Timex fan, so I am going to be be critical. The size is pretty much identical to the original, the designers resisting, possibly, an urge to make a larger version. The case is in the same style, and in keeping with the original is plated metal, rather than steel. The crown, like most quartz crowns is not very substantial, not like the larger crown on the original, but it's not tiny either.

The watch came in a period-looking plastic clamshell case, lined by satiny type cloth, with "Timex Marlin." Unlike most watches sold today, it is displayed "laying down" in the case. Each open case takes up a lot more room than the cases of most other watches you see for sale, and the window display was appealing.

The only real complaint was the strap. It does have the same type of stamped buckle from that time period, though in steel, with the single fixed loop for the free end. It is leather, but it's not a real quality strap, either in the quality of the leather, or the construction. But for 34.99, I guess I can't complain.

See some more pictures below. All in all, I love the look of this watch. For a vintage line, I think Timex did a pretty good job. I think they kept it as authentic as possible. Can I deal with the quartz? I am still not sure, I might not, but we'll see.

Let me know what you think? I wonder how the line will do. It might be a test market, the Target stores. Interesting they came out with the line, actually. They must have gotten wind of the fact that some people are interested in vintage Timex watches...


Alan - I went to Target and SuperTarget in Omaha today and they don't carry this watch and are not planning to do so. Do you know where else they might be selling this watch? I'm with you, I think it's a good looking reproduction and would love to have one!!!
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David
David

December 17th, 2002, 9:01 pm #9

I like the Marlin too. I've searched several Target stores in my area (Tidewater, VA) & came across 2 Marlins this week; 1 in VA Beach ($29.99) & 1 in Norfolk ($24.99 - 15% off sale on ALL Timex "Classics"). Naturally, I bought 'em both <grin>. I even bought 1 of the "Electrics"... couldn't resist! I recommend you keep hitting those Targets. They might be clearing them from the display case to make room for other models. I suspect this because the Norfolk store had the "Retro's" on display earlier this year, then they were gone, now they're back. Either that or Timex has started making them again. Either way, I wish you luck.
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Martin Manhart
Martin Manhart

January 4th, 2003, 11:38 pm #10


If you want the short review, it pretty much rocks!



I was wondering about this new line from Timex, as it had been mentioned here a few times. I wrote Timex recently, and got an pretty quick email back from Samantha, who told me that it was being sold through Target Department Stores, but not through their website. Well, today I visited Target, and sure enough, there they were.



The line is officially called the "Heritage Collection," and was in a cabinet display with a blowup of a vintage ad, featuring a stylyish woman wearing a watch in which the watch dangles, like a charm, from a wrist chain.

There were maybe fifteen different styles, men's and women's. Two were called "Marlin," about four called "Electric," one or two called "Catavina," a folding small watch/clock in a cushion case (two examples) called "Fairview," a PW called "Yankee," and several examples of the very small ladies watches with elaborate bands, from 50s.



The little folding box/watch was very sharp looking, about the size of a pillbox, but I was not sure what I'd do with it. The Electrics looked pretty good, but they didn't say "Electric" on the dial, only on the box, and this disapointed me a bit. There was one Electric with a cream colored dial, which I think was a pretty good attempt to re-create a vintage, evenly aged patina! Of course, all of these were quartz watches, the entire line.

Most seemed to be selling for 34.99 USD. The Marlin reproduction I bought was designed very carefully to be as close as possible to what is emerging as the "most famous" vintage men's Timex; one of the 1954 or 1955 versions of the original Marlin, with green luminous numbers painted on a brushed (aluminum?) dial, fine black borders around the luminous numbers, outer minute track in black and white, yellow-gold minute and seconds hands, spindle-shaped red seconds, and lest we forget, "Waterproof" above the six, in red. This repro dial is very very close, and I give a lot of credit to the designer. Even the metal of the dial has the same straight brushed fine lines, of the original, which I thought was very impressive.

Sure, I'd love to have had the "Waterproof" designation, but I'd think even for a vintage repro, they would run into trouble if they'd printed it. The Timex logo is slightly different, and the seconds hand is stock parts, not specialty made in the beautiful spindle shape, with almost a diamond shaped counterweight. But these are the comments of a self-described vintage Timex fan, so I am going to be be critical. The size is pretty much identical to the original, the designers resisting, possibly, an urge to make a larger version. The case is in the same style, and in keeping with the original is plated metal, rather than steel. The crown, like most quartz crowns is not very substantial, not like the larger crown on the original, but it's not tiny either.

The watch came in a period-looking plastic clamshell case, lined by satiny type cloth, with "Timex Marlin." Unlike most watches sold today, it is displayed "laying down" in the case. Each open case takes up a lot more room than the cases of most other watches you see for sale, and the window display was appealing.

The only real complaint was the strap. It does have the same type of stamped buckle from that time period, though in steel, with the single fixed loop for the free end. It is leather, but it's not a real quality strap, either in the quality of the leather, or the construction. But for 34.99, I guess I can't complain.

See some more pictures below. All in all, I love the look of this watch. For a vintage line, I think Timex did a pretty good job. I think they kept it as authentic as possible. Can I deal with the quartz? I am still not sure, I might not, but we'll see.

Let me know what you think? I wonder how the line will do. It might be a test market, the Target stores. Interesting they came out with the line, actually. They must have gotten wind of the fact that some people are interested in vintage Timex watches...


I would like to know where today I can buy this replica of a fine Timex watch. Target stores in my area do not carry this watch as suggested in the review. Please advise.
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