Timex History: more documents (3 pages) from Movement Exchange Program....

Alan N.
Alan N.

August 3rd, 2005, 1:01 am #1



Two other documents below, see those first, maybe. This gets more interesting...Firstly it is from 1967 and the previous document posted a few days ago was from 1968, so now I'm not sure when the program started. The price list gives details on the cost of a batch of movements you get, provided you send in the broken movements. It also has batches of crystals, dials and hands.

This document, whether or not it was published and distributed by Timex, seems to be all about Morris Rosenbloom as he seems to be listed as the main contact to get these movements. Why didn't this go directly through Timex, but instead through this distributor? I suspect his distribution chain, communications, mail order setup was so smooth and streamlined an operation already, that Timex figured why bother ourselves with this monkey business, let's farm it out to Morris Rosenbloom? Maybe Timex didn't have the staff to deal with this, or didn't want to bother, easier to ship massive quantities of parts to New York and let them handle it, for a fee I'm sure. Morris wouldn't do it for free.

By the way, I looked online for any evidence for this company and found a little bit. It still exists 100 years later. The first is a history site.

http://www.nwmangum.com/Kodak/Rochester.html

It seems that Morris had a wholesale jewelry company, began in 1905, and he died in 1935. He was succeeded by his son Rufus, and obviously the company maintainted the same business name. That was a historical website above, but the next site:

http://www.wedcny.org/html/industrial/macedon.html

If you scroll down or CRTL F rosen, you will see the company occupying some part of this ugly industrial complex. Now they seem to make golf and sports products and sunglasses, as shown in this political funding site:

http://www.senatornozzolio.com/press_ar ... sp?id=5195

What does this all mean, probably not much. I doubt Rufus is alive, and unlikely that anyone at Morris Rosenbloom knows anything about the Timex Exchange Program. I just want to know if it really worked, or if these brochures I have outlined a program that was kind of lukewarm or short lived. Anyone know? Check your Timex Repair manuals, maybe there are more documents.



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Knut
Knut

August 3rd, 2005, 5:32 pm #2

Below is what I found in one of my manuals. I guess this is part of most Timex Manuals, but I thought I'd post the pages anyway. First is a description of the retail parts price list No. 11-R.
Next is the actual price for the reconditioned movements and finally the date of the pricelist: effective June 1, 1966.

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Hope these show up ok.

Knut
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Alan N.
Alan N.

August 3rd, 2005, 6:19 pm #3

... for a while, at least 1966 or maybe earlier, based on these papers which seem to show you can buy the items from Little Rock. At some point, seems like 1967 Timex decided to farm out this operation to Morris Rosenbloom Co. in New York State, for the reasons I suspected above.

I wonder, actually, whether it was more costly to actually recondition/repair the returned movements, or just put in a factory new one. With mass production of a cheap movement these Timexes were, wonder if it would be more costly to sort through the received movements, find out what the heck is wrong with each and every one of them, repair the movement, and then send it back. Might make more sense to just send in fresh movements to the watchmakers/jewelers. But that assumes the movements were cheap, which might be incorrect.
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Bill D
Bill D

August 3rd, 2005, 6:39 pm #4

Below is what I found in one of my manuals. I guess this is part of most Timex Manuals, but I thought I'd post the pages anyway. First is a description of the retail parts price list No. 11-R.
Next is the actual price for the reconditioned movements and finally the date of the pricelist: effective June 1, 1966.

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Hope these show up ok.

Knut
I have the price list revisions 13R and 14R from Feb 1970 and March 1971 respectively. Both show prices for reconditioned movements but neither show credit for returned movements.
Interesting also is the pricing. i.e. in 1966 your book shows a mod 22 @ $1.90. My 1970 book shows it @ $2.55

Bill D
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Sevesteen, aka Dave Johnson
Sevesteen, aka Dave Johnson

August 3rd, 2005, 6:44 pm #5

... for a while, at least 1966 or maybe earlier, based on these papers which seem to show you can buy the items from Little Rock. At some point, seems like 1967 Timex decided to farm out this operation to Morris Rosenbloom Co. in New York State, for the reasons I suspected above.

I wonder, actually, whether it was more costly to actually recondition/repair the returned movements, or just put in a factory new one. With mass production of a cheap movement these Timexes were, wonder if it would be more costly to sort through the received movements, find out what the heck is wrong with each and every one of them, repair the movement, and then send it back. Might make more sense to just send in fresh movements to the watchmakers/jewelers. But that assumes the movements were cheap, which might be incorrect.
I wonder what is involved in reconditioning movements? My guess is that the reconditioning process is primarily just a clean and lube, then they'd be wound and checked to see if they run and keep time for a day or two. The ones that pass get shippped to dealers, the ones that fail get thrown out. If it were done efficiently, I could see this taking under a minute or two of labor per movement.
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RMF
RMF

August 3rd, 2005, 9:10 pm #6

Below is what I found in one of my manuals. I guess this is part of most Timex Manuals, but I thought I'd post the pages anyway. First is a description of the retail parts price list No. 11-R.
Next is the actual price for the reconditioned movements and finally the date of the pricelist: effective June 1, 1966.

[/IMG]

[/IMG]

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Hope these show up ok.

Knut
Just to put these 1966 prices in perspective, if you adjust the listed prices to 2005 dollars, you get the following:
$0.25 = $1.49
$0.50 = $2.98
$0.65 = $3.87
$1.25 = $7.44
$1.90 = $11.30
$2.25 = $13.39
$2.35 = $13.99

The movement prices are consistant with the prices currently charged at wholesale for inexpensive quartz replacement movements, such as those offered by Citizen/Miyota. According to the O&F catelog, most of the Citizen/Miyota replacement quartz movements run between about $7.00 and $13.00, with higher prices for the few movements that provide more functions.

F.Y.I., the 1966 to 2005 (est.) conversion factor is 0.168. Source: Inflation Conversion Factors for Dollars, 1665 to Estimated 2015, compiled by Robert C. Sahr, Oregon State University (rev. 2/18/05).
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Bill T
Bill T

August 4th, 2005, 3:13 am #7

Below is what I found in one of my manuals. I guess this is part of most Timex Manuals, but I thought I'd post the pages anyway. First is a description of the retail parts price list No. 11-R.
Next is the actual price for the reconditioned movements and finally the date of the pricelist: effective June 1, 1966.

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[/IMG]

[/IMG]

Hope these show up ok.

Knut
My Feb 1, 1970 Timex manual lists the reconditioned movements, but my 1971 and 1972 manuals don't.

The 22 movement is listed at 2.55
The 23 Movement is listed at 2.45

If I only knew to order back then.

Bill T
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Jack from Philadelphia
Jack from Philadelphia

August 4th, 2005, 11:30 am #8

... for a while, at least 1966 or maybe earlier, based on these papers which seem to show you can buy the items from Little Rock. At some point, seems like 1967 Timex decided to farm out this operation to Morris Rosenbloom Co. in New York State, for the reasons I suspected above.

I wonder, actually, whether it was more costly to actually recondition/repair the returned movements, or just put in a factory new one. With mass production of a cheap movement these Timexes were, wonder if it would be more costly to sort through the received movements, find out what the heck is wrong with each and every one of them, repair the movement, and then send it back. Might make more sense to just send in fresh movements to the watchmakers/jewelers. But that assumes the movements were cheap, which might be incorrect.
Timex, ever strving for zero defects, may have checked the returns by serial number for evidence of problems in manufacture and/or assembly. They would otherwise be mass-producing intricate machinery "in the dark," with no input as to just how well they were doing. It is not a good thing to see sales go up if people are junking faulty products and buying a new one. Over time people will turn to other brands.
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