timex dynabeat time zone repair

timex dynabeat time zone repair

Harvey T.
Harvey T.

July 19th, 2005, 1:00 pm #1

I recently purchased a vintage Timex Electric Dynabeat Time Zone wrist watch from an estate sale. The watch did not have a battery and the case did not list the type needed so I researched this and found it should take an "a" cell which I cross referenced to an Energizer 357/303. I installed the battery + side up and then down but a new battery did not make the watch run. So now I want to find a reputable timex repair-person to put this watch into good working order again. Any help/suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
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Phillip Gonsher
Phillip Gonsher

July 19th, 2005, 3:46 pm #2

After you put the battery in did you tap the watch on a soft surface to kinda jump start? I find that that sometime works.
Phillip
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HARVEY T.
HARVEY T.

July 19th, 2005, 4:10 pm #3

Yes I did tap it on a soft surface, then on a harder surface but no luck in starting this watch. Someone suggested that I dribble a few drops of ronson lighter fluid inside to loosen up the parts but this seems rather drastic. Thanks for your reply, this seems like a really good forum for helping people.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

July 19th, 2005, 10:11 pm #4

The stuff evaporates so fast it has little time to do any kind of damage, although you're right; it does seem like insanity. Give it a shot though!
--Charlie
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RonD.
RonD.

July 19th, 2005, 10:55 pm #5

Yes I did tap it on a soft surface, then on a harder surface but no luck in starting this watch. Someone suggested that I dribble a few drops of ronson lighter fluid inside to loosen up the parts but this seems rather drastic. Thanks for your reply, this seems like a really good forum for helping people.
You might also want to check the battery. I recently bought a strip of 303 batteries and they were all half dead. I guess they don;t sell a lot of them.

Like Phillip mentioned, after installing the battery, give the watch a little shake to get it running.

Ron
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Joined: May 8th, 2005, 11:38 am

July 20th, 2005, 2:42 am #6

I recently purchased a vintage Timex Electric Dynabeat Time Zone wrist watch from an estate sale. The watch did not have a battery and the case did not list the type needed so I researched this and found it should take an "a" cell which I cross referenced to an Energizer 357/303. I installed the battery + side up and then down but a new battery did not make the watch run. So now I want to find a reputable timex repair-person to put this watch into good working order again. Any help/suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
your Timex "Dynabeat" is in need of a good cleaning and lubrication. Assuming that it does not also require repair / replacement of parts, then any local watchmaker ought to be able to provide this service for you at a reasonable fee.

Sadly, many of the so-called "new" batteries sold at places like drug stores, etc. aren't as fresh as they should be. Whenever one replaces a battery in a watch, it is very important to try to use the freshest battery possible. Not only is this important in order to get the maximum operational time out of the watch, but it helps minimize the chance that the battery will leak inside of the watch and really mess up its movement.

technoguy

P.S. I do not recommend smacking watches against hard surfaces to get them to start. If the watch has jeweled bearings on the balance wheel, then this action could crack either the balance wheel staff pivots, their jeweled bearings, or both. I would, at most, recommend only tapping the watch against the open palm of one hand. If this fails to get it running, then there is another trick I sometimes use.

I hold the watch case with the tips of my fingers of one hand so that the plane of the case is parallel to the floor. Then I twist my hand back and forth with my forearm muscles while keeping the plane of the watch case level with the floor. This action really makes the balance wheel in a mechanical watch oscillate back and forth strongly.

If this trick doesn't get the movement running, then it's time to service it or check it for serious problems.
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EdH
EdH

July 20th, 2005, 12:25 pm #7

I have a good selection of Dynabeats and I sometimes have had to shake them to get them going after removing or replacing the battery. Like Technoguy says, hold the case in your first two fingers and thumb, parallel with the floor (dial face up) and rotate your hand from left to right, with a brisk motion, to get the balance wheel in motion. DO NOT 'BANG' WATCH ON ANY HARD OR SOFT SURFACE. You could crack a jewel bearing, or cause stress to other delicate parts.

Another caution: DO NOT PUT THE BATTERY BACKWARDS...you said in your post that you first inserted it PLUS up and then reversed it. The battery should only go in one way, and that is normally with the PLUS side facing up as you insert it, unless otherwise noted in the movement.

I agree, again, with Technoguy that the watch probably needs cleaning and lubrication. A local watch maker will probably charge anywhere from $35.00 to $65.00 + for the procedure. If the watch is a collectable, it is probably worth the investment. If not, try the Ronsonol shot, but be careful to avoid soaking the balance wheel hairspring.

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Ed
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Scott
Scott

July 20th, 2005, 4:08 pm #8

I recently purchased a vintage Timex Electric Dynabeat Time Zone wrist watch from an estate sale. The watch did not have a battery and the case did not list the type needed so I researched this and found it should take an "a" cell which I cross referenced to an Energizer 357/303. I installed the battery + side up and then down but a new battery did not make the watch run. So now I want to find a reputable timex repair-person to put this watch into good working order again. Any help/suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
Try going over the battery contacts lightly with a pencil eraser-the thinnest layer of oxide will keep things from working sometimes.WallyWorld has Ray-O-Vac two paks of watch batteries in the size you need..I've never gotten a dud from them. Definitely observe polarity,or you take the chance of destroying the drive circuit..which I think is a simple one FET pulse circuit, but don't quote me on that.
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Alan N .
Alan N .

July 20th, 2005, 6:30 pm #9

I recently purchased a vintage Timex Electric Dynabeat Time Zone wrist watch from an estate sale. The watch did not have a battery and the case did not list the type needed so I researched this and found it should take an "a" cell which I cross referenced to an Energizer 357/303. I installed the battery + side up and then down but a new battery did not make the watch run. So now I want to find a reputable timex repair-person to put this watch into good working order again. Any help/suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
Ed repaired two of my "hopeless" electromechanicals, and they are running smoothly, with new crystals and polish.

In fact my watchmaker was impressed so much to see a running Timex electric, stating that "you don't see many of these running any more."

I'm skeptical about local watchmakers, in general, being able to fix these, or even willing to try. Some have suggested this, but I'm skeptical. I would just send it to Ed, in Michigan.
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EdH
EdH

July 20th, 2005, 7:40 pm #10

Hello All,

Ed T has had some severe eye problems, and is not back up to speed as yet. Hopefully it will not be too long. You could email him and ask when he's going to be able to do any more repairs.

I exchanged emails about 10 days ago and he was not sure when he would be able to start repairing again.

Cheers,

Ed H
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