need tech info on how INDIGLO is produced

need tech info on how INDIGLO is produced

EDWARD MACNICHOL, Ph.D.
EDWARD MACNICHOL, Ph.D.

November 12th, 2001, 8:52 pm #1

As a biophysicist and researcher on vision, and a designer of research equipment for neurophysiology and research on vision, I am fascinated by the INDIGLO watch. I know of no other device that can produce uniform field of light in a flat plate about 3 cm. in diameter and about 1 mm. or less thick, and, furthermore, use so little energy that I have not had to change the battery in over 2 years. I would greatly appreciate a thorough explanation or references to published technical papers.
Many thanks in advance for any info.
Ted MacNichol
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Foggy
Foggy

November 12th, 2001, 9:28 pm #2

Here is a link to Peter J Kindlmann. I believe, from my searches on the web, that he worked on developing Indiglo. US patent 4527096 refers. Maybe you could make direct contact with Professor Kindlmann via this link.

http://www.eng.yale.edu/ee-labs/morse/about/pjk.html

Hope this helps.

Regards

Foggy
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Ted MacNichol
Ted MacNichol

November 14th, 2001, 2:16 am #3

Many thanks for the info which seems right on the beam.
Will follow it up right away.
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Dave
Dave

March 21st, 2002, 7:04 pm #4

As a biophysicist and researcher on vision, and a designer of research equipment for neurophysiology and research on vision, I am fascinated by the INDIGLO watch. I know of no other device that can produce uniform field of light in a flat plate about 3 cm. in diameter and about 1 mm. or less thick, and, furthermore, use so little energy that I have not had to change the battery in over 2 years. I would greatly appreciate a thorough explanation or references to published technical papers.
Many thanks in advance for any info.
Ted MacNichol
Timex received the patent for the Indiglo® nightlight in 1988. The nightlight's bluish green light illuminates the entire dial of the watch evenly at the push of a button. The dial is coated with a compound of zinc sulfide mixed with copper, a substance which becomes luminescent when an electrical charge is applied. This layer is sandwiched between two conductive layers which act as electrodes. When the button is pushed, energy is supplied by the battery across the two electrodes, which in turn lights up the dial.

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