Need Help! Timex Electronic

Need Help! Timex Electronic

Larry H
Larry H

February 22nd, 2004, 12:06 am #1

Need help on this watch . Is this one of the Timex watches that had the old Hamilton electric movement?
How old is it? By the way it runs great.

Thanks,
Larry
<img src=http://home.4state.com/~larryh/timex1.jpg>
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Dorsey H.
Dorsey H.

February 22nd, 2004, 1:18 pm #2

Hello Larry and Thanks for your interesting post. I've looked far and wide for information about a "Hamiltion" movement in a Timex watch. The Timex History book..."TIMEX...A COMPANY AND IT'S COMMUNITY...1854 - 1998" mentions Hamilton several times but only as a major competitor back in the 1950's and 1960's. Timex even took the credit for eventually driving Hamilton out of business.

The fact that your watch is classified "Electronic" indicates that it has a movement that was a second generation Timex electric. The first "Electric" Timex was introduced in 1962 using extremely high quality eleven-jeweled movements made by Timex in Germany. These are generally distinguished by the "BackSet" hand setting mechanicsm on the back of the watch. It should be noted, however, that not all "BackSet" watches have the coveted #67 movement. The #67 movements were of such high quality that Timex lost money on every watch it sold. Timex engineers then rushed to develop the #40 movement which proved to be a durable non-jeweled alternative to the #67.

The first of the "Electronic" watches came along in 1965 with the #84 (non-date) and #85 (date) movements. The change in terms from electric to electronic was apparently done to more accurately describe the true nature of the circuitry involved.

You can determine the year of manufacture of your watch by reading the small numbers at the bottom of the dial. The group of numbers to the left is the model/catalog number. The two or 3 numbers to the far right are the year of manufacture (ex: 067 or 67 means 1967 year of manufacture). The numbers immediately preceeding the year of manufacture are the movement number (ex 84, 084, 85, 085)

I hope you've found this information useful. Thanks again for your post.

Dorsey H.
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Alan N.
Alan N.

February 23rd, 2004, 5:20 am #3

being used in Timex watches. Thanks Dorsey for more info on the Electric and Electronic watches.
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Bret
Bret

February 23rd, 2004, 6:19 am #4

Hello Larry and Thanks for your interesting post. I've looked far and wide for information about a "Hamiltion" movement in a Timex watch. The Timex History book..."TIMEX...A COMPANY AND IT'S COMMUNITY...1854 - 1998" mentions Hamilton several times but only as a major competitor back in the 1950's and 1960's. Timex even took the credit for eventually driving Hamilton out of business.

The fact that your watch is classified "Electronic" indicates that it has a movement that was a second generation Timex electric. The first "Electric" Timex was introduced in 1962 using extremely high quality eleven-jeweled movements made by Timex in Germany. These are generally distinguished by the "BackSet" hand setting mechanicsm on the back of the watch. It should be noted, however, that not all "BackSet" watches have the coveted #67 movement. The #67 movements were of such high quality that Timex lost money on every watch it sold. Timex engineers then rushed to develop the #40 movement which proved to be a durable non-jeweled alternative to the #67.

The first of the "Electronic" watches came along in 1965 with the #84 (non-date) and #85 (date) movements. The change in terms from electric to electronic was apparently done to more accurately describe the true nature of the circuitry involved.

You can determine the year of manufacture of your watch by reading the small numbers at the bottom of the dial. The group of numbers to the left is the model/catalog number. The two or 3 numbers to the far right are the year of manufacture (ex: 067 or 67 means 1967 year of manufacture). The numbers immediately preceeding the year of manufacture are the movement number (ex 84, 084, 85, 085)

I hope you've found this information useful. Thanks again for your post.

Dorsey H.
In your message, you stated that Timex put Hamilton out of business. That is not quite accurate from what I know. A swiss firm bought out Hamilton in the 1970s and they became a higher-end watch, sort of like Seiko or Citizen. Anyone correct me if I'm wrong.

Bret
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Taz
Taz

February 23rd, 2004, 1:51 pm #5

I think Hamilton is still an American Owned Company. They were so good in the early 1900's that the rail road adopted them exclusively. Later, the airline industry adopted them. They were the best made American watches back then. Almost every Hamilton I have purchased on ebay was running when I got them. That says something about American Craftmanship back then.

Jim
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Dorsey H.
Dorsey H.

February 23rd, 2004, 1:56 pm #6

In your message, you stated that Timex put Hamilton out of business. That is not quite accurate from what I know. A swiss firm bought out Hamilton in the 1970s and they became a higher-end watch, sort of like Seiko or Citizen. Anyone correct me if I'm wrong.

Bret
Hi Bret,

It's possible that I misinterpreted what I read in the Timex History book. On page 196 it says in part ...."just as Timex's low-cost mechanicals had driven out Benrus, Elgin, Hamilton and Waltham in the 1960's"... then it goes on to discuss the tough competition Timex fased from Asian watchmakers saying, "By 1980, Hong Kong watch assemblers, new-comers to the horological industry, had stolen world leadership in low-cost watchmaking away from Timex".

My interpretation, possibly flawed, was that Timex had "driven out" Hamilton along with the three other basically American watch manufacturers back in the 1960's just as Asian watchmakers almost drove Timex out in the 1980's.

My wife and I visited the NAWCC Museum (National Watch and Clock Collector's) in Pennsylvania last summer and that FABULOUS Museum has quite a bit of display and historical data concerning the Hamilton Watch Company which was a local Pennsylvania company. I didn't see anything to indicate that it had continued under another name or had moved to another country.

If anyone's a Hamilton expert out there I'd love to learn more about their demise.

Dorsey H.
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Dorsey H.
Dorsey H.

February 23rd, 2004, 2:07 pm #7

Here's a link to a site that has a capsule history of Hamilton Watches. It ends abruptly in 1957 but doesn't say what happened to the company.

Dorsey H.

http://www.antiquevintagewatches.com/history.html
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Dorsey H.
Dorsey H.

February 23rd, 2004, 2:13 pm #8

Here's an even better site with a really cool video about the history of Hamilton Watches. Since it looks like there are some modern Hamilton Watches, I'd say it's still an operating company somewhere.

Dorsey H.

http://www.hamiltonwatch.com/
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RonD.
RonD.

February 23rd, 2004, 3:11 pm #9

Hi Bret,

It's possible that I misinterpreted what I read in the Timex History book. On page 196 it says in part ...."just as Timex's low-cost mechanicals had driven out Benrus, Elgin, Hamilton and Waltham in the 1960's"... then it goes on to discuss the tough competition Timex fased from Asian watchmakers saying, "By 1980, Hong Kong watch assemblers, new-comers to the horological industry, had stolen world leadership in low-cost watchmaking away from Timex".

My interpretation, possibly flawed, was that Timex had "driven out" Hamilton along with the three other basically American watch manufacturers back in the 1960's just as Asian watchmakers almost drove Timex out in the 1980's.

My wife and I visited the NAWCC Museum (National Watch and Clock Collector's) in Pennsylvania last summer and that FABULOUS Museum has quite a bit of display and historical data concerning the Hamilton Watch Company which was a local Pennsylvania company. I didn't see anything to indicate that it had continued under another name or had moved to another country.

If anyone's a Hamilton expert out there I'd love to learn more about their demise.

Dorsey H.
As far as I know, Hamilton is still around. You see their automatic and quartz watches in the stores.
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Jack from Philadelphia
Jack from Philadelphia

February 23rd, 2004, 7:50 pm #10

Hamilton is now a subsidiary of the Swatch group. I am uncertain if they do any production domestically. Being part of the Swatch conglomerate they probably use ETA movements. You can read a list of who owns who on pg. 623 of the 2003 Shugart guide.

Hamilton presently makes both quartz and mechanical watches, including some re-makes of old classics like the Khaki (as seen in the movie Pearl Harbor),the Ventura (Men in Black) and the Piping Rock. Their re-issues often include vintage style scissor bands.
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