help me fix my automatic

help me fix my automatic

R.J.
R.J.

June 24th, 2002, 10:02 pm #1

I have an automatic '70's something watch that has just stoped working and i would like to fix it. The watch repair guy said $50 an hr and that it was not worth it. Alot he knows its the fav in my small collection. I think i could fix it myself if i had a manual and some inside know how. So im here for HELP! the # on the face is 46650 3273 if enyone can help please let me know. Where could i find a manual and some history on the watch. I also have timex 21 # 6517 7268 and would like to know its history as well. Are the last 2 digits the year of manufacter? Thanks i look forward to hearing from anyone who can help me.
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Dorsey H.
Dorsey H.

June 25th, 2002, 3:31 pm #2

Hi R.J.,

I have a couple of Timex Service and Repair Manuals and I'll check them to see if the movements you listed are included. If so, I'd be delighted to mail you photocopies of the pertinent schematics and service recommendations. Let me know your email address and we'll sort out the best way for me to get the copies to you. I agree with you. If the watch is important to you, it's WELL WORTH what it takes to get it working again. I'm a novice at watch repair and have struggled a bit with the self-winding mechanicsms on these watches. It's one of the many things I'm attempting to learn but I'm enjoying the challenge.

Dorsey H. (dewberrytwo@aol.com)
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R.J.
R.J.

June 25th, 2002, 8:37 pm #3

That would be great if you could get that info to me, can you scan it and send to my e-mail that would probly work best for me. What sort of problems have you run across with the automatics? Mine stoped but if you tap it it will run about 5sec the best its done was about 35sec and stoped again. Tap run stop tap run stop. When i first got it i had to tap it to get it going and it ran great for about 47-49 days. It has the date as well could dat be part of the problem ? Thanks for helping! R.J.(hotrodman75@hotmail.com)
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Dorsey H.
Dorsey H.

June 27th, 2002, 12:21 pm #4

Hi Again R.J.,

Sorry that I failed to answer your specific question about the meaning of the numbers at the bottom of the older Timex dials. Normally, for me at least, the only really useful information is contained in the final four numbers. The last two numbers are the year of manufacture, thus one ending in "71" was manufactured in 1971. The two preceeding numbers are the movement number. That number can be very helpful if you have a movement that's not working and you want to replace it with one that's good. So, if the final four numbers are 2371, you have a watch which uses a number 23 movement and was manufactured in 1971. The numbers to the left of the last four numbers are the model number. Once in a while you'll see a letter "A" following the last two numbers. I have no idea what that means.

From my very limited experience, I'd say that a watch that runs irregularly with frequent runs of a few seconds or minutes and then stops needs cleaning. The watch repair books and videos I have say that the problem is probably some sort of dirt on a moving part that keep coming back around on one of the wheels and the watch slows or stops when the mechanism hits that dirty spot. My own experience has been that when I clean the movements thoroughly (I use an ultra sonic cleaner), most of the watches that had been running irregularly run perfectly. If the irregular running isn't corrected with a good cleaning, then you have some sort of mechanical problem.

Also, you can find old Timex Service and Repair Manuals for sale on Ebay from time to time. I've purchased two that way for as little as $6.99 each plus shipping. They usually cover Timex models produced between the early 1960's and the mid to late 1970's, which is a period that covers the time when most of the old wind-up's, automatics and the early electric/electronics were made. I've found that I can follow the step-by-step service proceedures outlined in those manuals fairly easily.

I hope this info has been helpful to you.

Dorsey
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RJ
RJ

June 28th, 2002, 11:04 pm #5

That info should help a great deal with the watchs i have and for looking in the second hand stores for more. Thanks again please keep the info coming. How many watchs do you have so far and are there any that realy stand out.
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Dorsey H.
Dorsey H.

June 29th, 2002, 2:04 pm #6

Hi RJ,

I'm still working on scanning those pages in my Timex Service Manual pertaining to your automatic. I have a few days off next week and will work on that. I've been doing this "restoration" work on old Timex windup's, automatics and early electric/electronics for about a year now. I purchase ONLY..the "old..not working..for parts only" Timex watches on Ebay. I usually get them for less than a dollar a piece. I also purchase parts such as crystals, stems and crowns and sometimes even old/new stock movements. I've managed to restore about 25 or 30 so far to near mint condition. I probably have about 150 to 200 old watches from which I scavange parts or use as the core for restoration. I really enjoy this hobby. In fact, I don't think I've ever found anything that gives me as much pure enjoyment and relaxation as spending hours trying to make an old watch run. I assure you...this is a hobby that TEACHES...PATIENCE. I chose Timex watches because of their relatively inexpensive costs and the large numbers of them available. You asked about my favorite watch? Well..it's a deep blue face early Timex electric. Everyone who has seen it just marvels at it's beauty. I particularly like it because it uses the mechanical watch mechanicsm but is battery powered and doesn't have to be wound daily.

Take care and Keep on "Ticking".

Dorsey
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Warren B
Warren B

June 30th, 2002, 10:21 pm #7

Hello Dorsey:

I found your comments to R.J. most helpful as I also have a seventies (76 if I'm reading the number correctly) vintage self-winding Timex that I would like to clean/fix. It was my grandfather's, and has great sentimental value to me. It seems to run well, but runs quite slowly (loses time). I had a wonderful Timex self-winding watch when I was in junior high school. It took no end of abuse, and I finally ended up losing it, as I recall, on a trip with my grandparents. As I remember from fooling around with mechanical watches, there's a speed regulator lever inside the watch, but for the life of me, I can't figure how to get the back off. Any assistance would be appreciated.

Regards, Warren
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Dorsey H.
Dorsey H.

July 8th, 2002, 6:03 am #8

Hi Warren,

I just returned from a few days in the mountains and was delighted to see your note. You've asked an interesting question about the removal of backs from Timex automatic/self-winding watches. The standard way is to place the sharp/pointed end of a case opening knife in the seam between the bezel and the back and wedge the blade point in with considerable pressure while rotating the blade from side to side until you pop the back loose. The real challenge is to get a good waterproof back on again. My suggestion is that before you start removing and re-installing waterproof backs you might want to invest in a case opening blade/knife and a mechanical watch press for re-installing the back. I've dealt with several good watch repair tool and supply companies online. One is www.slarose.com . I've always had good service from that company. Thanks for your inquiry.

Dorsey
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RJ
RJ

July 9th, 2002, 12:36 am #9

Hi RJ,

I'm still working on scanning those pages in my Timex Service Manual pertaining to your automatic. I have a few days off next week and will work on that. I've been doing this "restoration" work on old Timex windup's, automatics and early electric/electronics for about a year now. I purchase ONLY..the "old..not working..for parts only" Timex watches on Ebay. I usually get them for less than a dollar a piece. I also purchase parts such as crystals, stems and crowns and sometimes even old/new stock movements. I've managed to restore about 25 or 30 so far to near mint condition. I probably have about 150 to 200 old watches from which I scavange parts or use as the core for restoration. I really enjoy this hobby. In fact, I don't think I've ever found anything that gives me as much pure enjoyment and relaxation as spending hours trying to make an old watch run. I assure you...this is a hobby that TEACHES...PATIENCE. I chose Timex watches because of their relatively inexpensive costs and the large numbers of them available. You asked about my favorite watch? Well..it's a deep blue face early Timex electric. Everyone who has seen it just marvels at it's beauty. I particularly like it because it uses the mechanical watch mechanicsm but is battery powered and doesn't have to be wound daily.

Take care and Keep on "Ticking".

Dorsey
Hi Dorsey thanks for the info. Yhats alot of watches! Maybe you could help me find the watch i'm looking for? Also a list of tools for a beginer.
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Dorsey H.
Dorsey H.

July 9th, 2002, 8:45 pm #10

Hi R.J.,

I'd be happy to help you look for a particular watch. Let me know what it is and I'll see what I can do. As far as tools for the beginner...(and I still classify myself as a beginner too)...I'd suggest the following:

A set of Jeweler's Screwdrivers
Some sort of magnifying viewing device.
A case opening knife
A watchband tool to insert spring bars.

With those tools..you can..get into the watch, remove the stem and crown which lets you take the movment out of most watches. Once you learn the basics of watch desigh..how they work...and get interested in learning more...I'd suggest you get a video or some books..and then branch out with more tools, maybe even a tool kit or set. I threw in the watchband tool so you can remove and install watch bands which makes it easier getting into the watch.

I think the best experience is to get some old watches..and just take them apart...see how they work. I've learned more from doing that than from anything else. At first...it looked very mysterious..but after a while, everything made sense.

I hope this has been helpful

Dorsey H.






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