Gold watches

Gold watches

RJ
RJ

December 19th, 2004, 1:00 pm #1

Does anyone know what type of metal alloy is used in Timex gold watches? Has it changed over the decades? I know there was some discussion about brass alloys a short while back, but I don't think this question was ever answered.

I've seen some newer watches using some kind of metal I don't like. It must be colored anodized aluminum, which doesn't really work for jewelry.
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Scott
Scott

December 19th, 2004, 3:17 pm #2

I*think* brass with a high zinc content is used as "gold" sometimes-buffed up shiny and lacquered...though I don't know if that's true with Timex or not.I thought "gold" watches were gold plated brass...I*think* another metal(rhodium?)is used as gold sometimes, but don't hold me to that.
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technoguy
technoguy

December 19th, 2004, 10:14 pm #3

Does anyone know what type of metal alloy is used in Timex gold watches? Has it changed over the decades? I know there was some discussion about brass alloys a short while back, but I don't think this question was ever answered.

I've seen some newer watches using some kind of metal I don't like. It must be colored anodized aluminum, which doesn't really work for jewelry.
I think Timex, like most other watch manufacturers, just used a 14 kt gold electroplating over a brass case for their goldtone watches. Like all such finishes, its ability to resist "brassing" (where the gold plating is completely gone and the underlying case metal shows through) is dependent on the thickness of the plated layer and the amount of wear the watch receives.

I am not a fan of electroplated jewelry because I have had too many bad experiences with it. Gold filled and gold rolled cases hold up much better, but raise the cost for the manufacturer.

Anodized finishes produce a slightly harder finish than conventional gold electroplating, but their main advantage is that they cut costs for the manufacturers. In the long run, they don't perform much better than conventional electroplating.

There's a new gold electroplating process that has been developed in Switzerland that is known as "Swiss Gold". Supposedly, it produces a VERY hard gold plated finish that far outlasts conventional gold plating. I do not know all of the details about the process, but I think I heard it uses gold nitride (AuN) which is a very hard alloy of gold. Although this new kind of plating is not indestructible, it will not wear off merely from contact with skin or clothing.

In September of this year I sent a proposal to Timex that they consider using "Nordic Gold" to make SOLID goldtone watch cases. It's an aluminum bronze that was developed by the Swedish Mint and is now being used on the 10, 20, and 50 cent Euro Coins. It retains a bright golden luster and is unaffected by perspiration. A solid watch case made from this unique alloy could never fade or brass. I have not heard anything from Timex yet about it, but I hope they will consider using it.

technoguy
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RJ
RJ

December 19th, 2004, 10:30 pm #4

Bronze usually contains more tin. Nordic gold contains more zinc, just like brass.
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technoguy
technoguy

December 19th, 2004, 11:04 pm #5

I'm not sure about the ratio of tin to zinc in Nordic Gold. But on several of the websites where I saw it mentioned, they refered to it as a bronze alloy. Whatever type of alloy one chooses to call it, the fact remains that it has some very desirable properties for use in solid watch cases.

technoguy
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