Another Stunning Retored Timex

Another Stunning Retored Timex

Taz
Taz

May 18th, 2004, 11:09 pm #1

Got this 1959 Selfwind Timex last year in a batch of 24. Cost for each was 20 cents. The dial had burn marks and the case was a little corroded. I waited and waited and finally got a 1960 version for $5.00. Moved the dial into it's new home stripped the gold tone off and plated it with 24K Gold. WOW I just love this watch. I normally wear a 1958 Timex that I converted to quartz; maybe I will post it later. It has a really nice patina dial, looks like an old world map (no kidding). My wive selected the band on this boy. The band cost $14. Everything as you can see is prestine; the dial, case and the hands are unmarked and flawless. Too bad they don't glow in the dark anymore. I will probably buy some glow goo. The best thing is, I have an extra movement that is in excellent shape; so when this movement dies, it will get a transplant. Who knows when that will be. The original is in such great shape. I just love wearing these old Timexes. People notice them and compliment me on them. Almost always, they ask, what kind of watch is that? The response is always. That's a Timex? Really? So far it has only lost 35 seconds in the last 20 hours!!!








What the Heck,

Here is a nice 1940's Bulova Curvex I got done restoring a few weeks ago. I left the dial, as it gives it a nice look. Keeping impecable time. My date assumption is based on a service date on 010443; I think it is a 3 could be an 8. I got this one with eight other watches off of ebay for a total of $12. I was after the Bulova. To my suprise, I got a watch simply described as Unknown. When I opened it, I found it to be a solid 14K gold 1940's Jules Jurgenson Elongated Tank!!! Might be older, but not sure. I will post that later this year, as am having it's dial redone. Man it is sweet.







Well enough watches for today. I got a lot done since last time I posted some. Got a lot of really nice vintage watches. This hobby is just so darn satisfying. Not to mention an obsessive one. God, I have so many watches laying around and in bins that I must get to one day. The only problem is, I keep buying more. I am assuming that this is a problem. I am even looking at Vintage and antique eight day mantle clocks. Especially Gilbert's as this is my last name. When will it ever stop?
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RonD.
RonD.

May 19th, 2004, 2:45 am #2

Great watches! I have a few of those Bulova's myself and I believe the dial and hand style to put the watch in the mid 1930s. Very nice indeed!

That is a great looking Timex. Do you fix the watches also?

Ron
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Anonymous
Anonymous

May 19th, 2004, 12:35 pm #3

I have the ability to repair both the movement and cases. On the Bulova, I repaired some wear through on the back. The only thing I haven't done is to replace any parts on the balance. I normally search for another movement if I have a broken staff or damaged hairspring. Just have not gotten the tools to do those types of repairs. I normally canabalize from one movement to another not really repairing individual parts. I still have a lot more to learn and still need more practice.

Taz
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RonD.
RonD.

May 19th, 2004, 1:13 pm #4

Same here, I know my limitations when it comes to repairing watches. I haven't gotten to reworking the cases yet though. Sounds interesting.
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Taz
Taz

May 19th, 2004, 2:44 pm #5

I'm pretty proficient with a soldering iron; I was an avionics electronic technician for over 15r years. Use to play with metals and such all the time when I was bored in the Navy. I was so good I kept up with all my work so I had a lot of spare time. I also learned alot about corrosion control and plating while I was in there too. So I decided to use all I know playing with these old watches. The fact is I know a little about everything and can fix and design just about anything. Only if I wan't to.

Taz

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Taz
Taz

May 19th, 2004, 3:03 pm #6

Got this 1959 Selfwind Timex last year in a batch of 24. Cost for each was 20 cents. The dial had burn marks and the case was a little corroded. I waited and waited and finally got a 1960 version for $5.00. Moved the dial into it's new home stripped the gold tone off and plated it with 24K Gold. WOW I just love this watch. I normally wear a 1958 Timex that I converted to quartz; maybe I will post it later. It has a really nice patina dial, looks like an old world map (no kidding). My wive selected the band on this boy. The band cost $14. Everything as you can see is prestine; the dial, case and the hands are unmarked and flawless. Too bad they don't glow in the dark anymore. I will probably buy some glow goo. The best thing is, I have an extra movement that is in excellent shape; so when this movement dies, it will get a transplant. Who knows when that will be. The original is in such great shape. I just love wearing these old Timexes. People notice them and compliment me on them. Almost always, they ask, what kind of watch is that? The response is always. That's a Timex? Really? So far it has only lost 35 seconds in the last 20 hours!!!








What the Heck,

Here is a nice 1940's Bulova Curvex I got done restoring a few weeks ago. I left the dial, as it gives it a nice look. Keeping impecable time. My date assumption is based on a service date on 010443; I think it is a 3 could be an 8. I got this one with eight other watches off of ebay for a total of $12. I was after the Bulova. To my suprise, I got a watch simply described as Unknown. When I opened it, I found it to be a solid 14K gold 1940's Jules Jurgenson Elongated Tank!!! Might be older, but not sure. I will post that later this year, as am having it's dial redone. Man it is sweet.







Well enough watches for today. I got a lot done since last time I posted some. Got a lot of really nice vintage watches. This hobby is just so darn satisfying. Not to mention an obsessive one. God, I have so many watches laying around and in bins that I must get to one day. The only problem is, I keep buying more. I am assuming that this is a problem. I am even looking at Vintage and antique eight day mantle clocks. Especially Gilbert's as this is my last name. When will it ever stop?
The free host services had a glitch so I had to repost the pictures.









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collin
collin

May 20th, 2004, 3:20 am #7

Hello,
Do you plate with zinc before you plate with gold? All I know of the process is from what I have read and the recomendations seem to be mixed. Your watch looks great and I would aspire to equal you results. Thanks, collin
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Anonymous
Anonymous

May 20th, 2004, 7:50 pm #8

I don't know about plating directly to zinc. Pennies are made of zinc and they corrode easily. I am also a metal detector enthusiast; most pennies I dig up from early 1980's and back are normally well intact. The one's after that are green and heavily pitted. Which means that if you do not ensure a proper surface preparation you could see your watch corrode. It is best to plate onto either Silver or Nickel. Nickel is preferred since it is much cheaper.

Most vintage watches that have gold content will most likely be brass or nickel underneath. If it is nickel, you can plate directly onto that. Brass, on the other hand, can also be plated directly onto but you run the risk of the finish corroding if you do not prepare it correctly. So again, a coat of nickel is best. Nickel plating is very particular and you must get the surface very clean. Gold on top of nickel will last longer than just gold onto of the brass. So you safe money and man hours later on.

Nickel will plate onto just about anything, but there are exceptions. Now the important thing is to prepare the surface just like you want it to look. That means removing all scratches, blemishes and any surface defects that you feel detracts from the look of the final product. If you want a high shine, you must shine it prior to plating it. When you plate the final product, it will have the same defects and blemishes that you had prior to plating. So the first initial steps are a must for a nice finish. The great thing about playing with watches, is that you can get many at pennies on the dollar and learning to plate on different items is very cheap. There are so many varieties of base metals on watches that sometimes it is a guessing game as to what plating sequences you have to use to get the final look you want.

I replate old gold content watches to bring that brand new look back to them. Again you must prepare the surface and you can just plate directly onto the gold without the nickel plating.

Chrome is another story. You must completely strip off the old chrome and most likely have to nickel plate prior to chroming the surface. Chrome is not cheap so I use what is know as Copy Chrome. It looks just like chrome and is just a durable. The only thing is, it must be polished on occasion. But the savings are huge when compared to real Chrome. You can strip the chrome off with a dremel tool and a 300 and 400 grit sanding sponge. The chrome will strip off quickly. You can also soak the part in a Muric Acid Solution.

To prepare the suface I follow the steps below:

1. Strip off any surface that cannot be plated onto. Like Chrome.

2. Wet sand surface with 400 grit then 1600 grit then polish up with brasso or flitz. You can also use a jeweler's rouge and polish here too. Get the surface to look like you want it!!!

3 Wash the surface with Soft Scrub to remove any oils and dirt. Wear gloves to prevent contamination from this point on. Infact, you might want to wear gloves when you wet sand as you can dry out your fingers and they will crack severely afer a few days.

4. Plate surface with Nickel or Silver if neither is present. Nickel preferred since it is cheaper and more durable. Although you can plate directly onto brass; again, nickel is preferred prior to plating.

5. Wash surface again with Soft Scrub and lighly polish and clean again with Soft Scrub.

6. Plate the surface with your final plate. This is either gold or chrome. With chrome you only need one plating coat as more is extra preparation. If you are plating with gold, plate then rinse then replate and repeat as desired. I normally plate with 5 to 6 coats if that is what you want to call it.

7. Protect the surface with a little polish. Preferrably Flitz as it is non-abrasive. Brasso can be used but dilute it with a little water to prevent cutting into the final finish as Brasso is an abrasive.

This is a quick how to. You can search the internet to find plating solutions and even very good references. I prefer to use www.caswellplating.com, they have a great forum and support for their buyers. If you decide to buy, get the Plug and Plate kit that you desire. Once you get one plug and plate you really only need extra wands and the plating solutions. You don't have to buy a new kit for every type of plating you want to use. As each kit comes with the same power source. The gold solution 4 oz bottle is about $25 and will plate 12 to 18 watches. The nickel solution is $15 I still have a lot left so I can't tell you how many you can plate. My purchases were:

Gold Plug and Plate Kit
Nickel Plating Solution
Copy Chrome Plating Solution
Stainless Steel Activator (This is Muric Acid you can also strip chrom with it)
Extra Stainless Steel Wands for each plating solution
Brush Plating Bandages (you can cut up a cotton tee shirt)

In fact, you can just buy the solutions and make the rest yourself; I am lazy so I bought it all.

Finally most old watches used Nickel as the final plating. Especially Timex and Westclox. It may look like chrome but infact is nickel. Some people will break out in a rash when they come into contact with nickel; that is why they really don't make Nickel plating a final plate these days. Good luck should you decided plate some items. It is very easy to do and just takes a little patience; as with every other aspect of watch repair.

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collin
collin

May 20th, 2004, 11:09 pm #9

nt
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Mister Ed
Mister Ed

September 17th, 2004, 8:32 pm #10

Got this 1959 Selfwind Timex last year in a batch of 24. Cost for each was 20 cents. The dial had burn marks and the case was a little corroded. I waited and waited and finally got a 1960 version for $5.00. Moved the dial into it's new home stripped the gold tone off and plated it with 24K Gold. WOW I just love this watch. I normally wear a 1958 Timex that I converted to quartz; maybe I will post it later. It has a really nice patina dial, looks like an old world map (no kidding). My wive selected the band on this boy. The band cost $14. Everything as you can see is prestine; the dial, case and the hands are unmarked and flawless. Too bad they don't glow in the dark anymore. I will probably buy some glow goo. The best thing is, I have an extra movement that is in excellent shape; so when this movement dies, it will get a transplant. Who knows when that will be. The original is in such great shape. I just love wearing these old Timexes. People notice them and compliment me on them. Almost always, they ask, what kind of watch is that? The response is always. That's a Timex? Really? So far it has only lost 35 seconds in the last 20 hours!!!








What the Heck,

Here is a nice 1940's Bulova Curvex I got done restoring a few weeks ago. I left the dial, as it gives it a nice look. Keeping impecable time. My date assumption is based on a service date on 010443; I think it is a 3 could be an 8. I got this one with eight other watches off of ebay for a total of $12. I was after the Bulova. To my suprise, I got a watch simply described as Unknown. When I opened it, I found it to be a solid 14K gold 1940's Jules Jurgenson Elongated Tank!!! Might be older, but not sure. I will post that later this year, as am having it's dial redone. Man it is sweet.







Well enough watches for today. I got a lot done since last time I posted some. Got a lot of really nice vintage watches. This hobby is just so darn satisfying. Not to mention an obsessive one. God, I have so many watches laying around and in bins that I must get to one day. The only problem is, I keep buying more. I am assuming that this is a problem. I am even looking at Vintage and antique eight day mantle clocks. Especially Gilbert's as this is my last name. When will it ever stop?
Hi Taz,

Ron D. found your post of the watches you had replated and forwarded it to me.

I just bought a 1950's Timex Marlin, which runs excellently, but the case needs a replating.

How much would you charge me to replate my Marlin case? Also, it has a split in the end of one of the lugs, as if someone had taken a hacksaw and tried to cut through it. Do you fix damage such as that? Can you hard solder with bronze, or a base metal? Let me know. The watches on your post look super!!!

Thanks for the reply.
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