Super Submariner lume ...........

Vintage Rolex Discussion

Super Submariner lume ...........

Joined: October 4th, 2006, 9:33 pm

October 5th, 2011, 10:27 pm #1

I like to share some wonderfull pictures Bernhard made of untouched 6200 lume...



























Together with B' 5510... with second generation lume...





Rg.Philipp

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Joined: May 2nd, 2010, 9:11 pm

October 5th, 2011, 10:31 pm #2

Fabulous P! When do we hear about its story? Also, nice chocolate below! :)
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Joined: October 4th, 2006, 9:33 pm

October 5th, 2011, 10:35 pm #3

Go check Bernhards blog for all info & more pictures...

Here's the text

" My father would often talk about the hard life as a farmer during the.....when World War II started he enlisted in the Navy.
During that time he completed his depression years....


.... This made him eligible for what the military called A school
and he was sent to school to be an aircraft engine mechanic. When he completed that training
he was assigned to a PBY submarine hunter squadron. For the second half of World War II the
squadron was assigned to Galapagos Island. He used to pronounce the islands name as Gal o
peg-us. It took a while to figure out what island he was talking about. He would tell stories about
spending the endless isolated hours riding the tortoises .....

His next duty station was some time around the beginning of 1947 and was a very short stint in
China just before they closed their doors to all other nations.

From there he left the Navy and returned to Wisconsin to go back into family farming. It only took
six months to realise he was no longer a farmer.

He re-enlisted in the Navy. Because of his mechanical background and good record he was sent to
Jet Engine school. You need to understand that is was the newest type of engines being introduced
into the military and he was in on the ground floor for maintenance and repair. While in school at
Pratt & Whitney in Connecticut he met and married my mother. That is a story all unto itself. After
completing Jet school he was assigned to an A3 Sky Warrior squadron station in Maine. Late in
1953 he was assigned to the Naval air station in Africa. I was just a youngster when my father and
family were stationed at Port Lyaute (now Kenitra) Morocco. The Navy was kind enough to allow
my farther to travel with the family on the Atlantic crossing. That was an auspicious moment in
our familys history because the A3 aircraft he was to be on crashed at sea with all hands lost.


Port Lyaute in the 1950's


I have a very limited knowledge of his actual duties while at this station. He would never talk
about what he did. He would say that they were flying missions over the coast and up to Gibraltar
keeping and eye on shipping and submarine activity. By this time my father was not only an
engine mechanic but the enlisted plane captain and part of the flight crew. I am sure this was
because he could identify and fix aircraft problems both while in flight and on the ground.

My mother became pregnant with my younger sister while stationed at Port Lyaute. This also was
when my father started wearing the Rolex. Later in life when I asked him where got the watch he
would only say in Port Lyaute. My mother would say she won it in a Bingo game. I think this was
a diversion because my father never talked about what he did. My mother knew that I would talk
about my fathers new watch and I am sure she hoped that is the story I would tell. She was right;
it was not until much after her death that my father would talk a little about Port Lyaute. What I
gathered is my mother was terrified of his flights with that squadron. That while the wars were
over, she considered the missions my father was flying extremely risky.

My mother could not wait to get out of Africa, and in 1955 the squadron was assigned to a little
base known Naval Air Station Chincoteague on the eastern shore of Virginia. Today it is called
Wallops Island Flight Center and is part of NASA. .....


........During that time I sat with my father and we talked about his youth, his Wisconsin family, my mother and his career.
When I asked about the watch and Africa he would not go into great detail other that it was not a
nice place to live. When I asked how he got the watch he would only say what did your mother
tell you.

When I asked about Naval Air Station Chincoteague he was more talkative. At that time he was
still attached to the squadron with the A3. By this time they only had one or two planes left in
the squadron and they were assigned to the Navy Flight Test in Patuxant River. He told me that
they were working with dropping shapes. When I asked what that meant the story he told was
amazing. The shape was an empty atomic bomb. It had all the parts except the explosive. In it
place there were scientific instrumentations. The plane would fly various missions depending on
what was being tested. Some times the drops were both high and low level used to help develop
better radar detection protocol for the Wallops Island radar station. Most of the time the shapes
were used to gather information about very high altitude entry or re-entry tests. They wanted to
learn what would happen to the shape and the equipment as it fell tens of thousands of feet from
subzero temperatures. He would talk about how cold his station near the bomb bay doors was.
Bitter cold would have been considered warm by the way my father talked about his adventures.
My fathers job was not only to make sure all the mechanical systems worked but to record times
and related information as speed, altitude, time to arm and drop, time to clear the probable blast
zone and how time changed if adjustments were made to any of the shapes parameters.

A3:


In 1959 the Navy no longer needed that program and my father was reassigned to aircraft carrier
out of Alameda Naval base near San Francisco. From 1959 until 1963 we did not see much of my
father. He would be on board the aircraft carrier Ranger and at sea 7 to 9 months a year. During
this time he became a Chief. This promotion sent him back to a Pratt and Whitney and Navy A
school where he learned how to service and repair A4 Sky Hawks. The sky Hawk was one of the
Navys smallest fighter/bomber to be able to deliver an atomic weapon. After his schooling the
family was transferred to La Moore Naval Air Station where he became the Master Chief for Attack
Squadron 93. Again during this time he was stationed aboard the USS Ranger and gone 7 to 9
months yearly. When he was home the squadron would be on the road several weeks at a time.
He never said where they were going but a map will show the ultra secret Area 51was just a few
hundred miles over the mountains. Just to put things in prospective in the early 1960s Le Moore
was just a small base in the middle of a big desert. The only thing we ever saw was cactus, bugs
and snakes and lots and lots of sand.

In 1963 my fathers final assignment was at Oceana Naval Air Station in Virginia Beach Virginia.
Here he was the Senior Master Chief until his retirement in 1965.


USS Ranger

........ One of the projects my father was most proud of was when the Navy was
having problems with launching Tomcats from a carrier. The pilot would run the engines to full
power and the cat would launch the aircraft. The fuel system was so sophisticated that it would
read the acceleration and adjust fuel flow accordingly. Unfortunately when the aircraft left the end
of the carrier it would decelerate and start to drop toward the ocean. The navy lost several aircraft
this way and a team was developed at the NARF & P&W to solve the problem. The final solution
at my fathers suggestion- put a landing gear over ride switch in. This would not let the fuel control
take over until the landing gear was up and locked. Problem solved, from a quite simple man who
understood jet engines and airplanes.

It was while he was working at the NARF that my father stopped wearing his Rolex. It sat on top
of our refrigerator for years. When I asked him why he was no longer wearing it, he told me it
was too dangerous to wear at the NARF, that there were to many places that would crush it on his
wrist or it could get caught and drag his hand into a moving part or machine.
From that time on my father only occasionally wore his Rolex. In his later years he said it was to
heavy on his wrist. It was during that time that I asked if he would allow me to have it as part of
my inheritance. He was never a man of opulence or jewellery and never realized the intrinsic or
monetary value of his Rolex. He said I could have it any time I wanted it.


When G. and I were talking about sailing around the world I asked my father if I could take the
watch. He gladly passed it on to me. As I stated earlier I considered having it refurbished. I knew
its value only as part of my life. I did not have it refurbished because I did not feel comfortable
sending it off and taking the chance on something being changed out of the watch.

...... In November of 2008 I wore the watch as I and 3 other men sailed Elusion (our HR 49 sailboat)
to Tortola in the British Virgin Islands. It was a 9 ½ day offshore trip in which I wore the watch
the entire time. The seas were big and the winds were strong. Wind speed averaged 35 knots and
wave height 5 to 8 meters on average. I chose the 12 midnight to 3 am watch as that best fit my
circadian rhythms. There were several nights when standing watch that I would look out over the
star filled silvery sea and think of my father. Hoping he was looking down on me saying, Kirt is
finally living his dream. At the end the race when times were corrected for handicap Elusion was
the overall winner. That was a wonderful start for our sailing adventure.

By the following February G. was ready to sail and we began a 3 year exploration of the
Leeward and Windward Islands. We explored every island from Grenada to the Bahamas ......

If the Rolex could talk it would tell a great story I am sure, from....Africa to Grenada and all across the United States with G. and me, and around the world with my father."


Rg.Philipp
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Joined: May 2nd, 2010, 9:11 pm

October 5th, 2011, 11:01 pm #4

That is FANTABULOUS!! Thanks P!
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Joined: October 30th, 2010, 2:36 am

October 5th, 2011, 11:46 pm #5

I like to share some wonderfull pictures Bernhard made of untouched 6200 lume...



























Together with B' 5510... with second generation lume...





Rg.Philipp
amazing clean dial,... Fantastic shots, great pair there
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Joined: May 7th, 2006, 5:02 pm

October 6th, 2011, 12:25 am #6

I like to share some wonderfull pictures Bernhard made of untouched 6200 lume...



























Together with B' 5510... with second generation lume...





Rg.Philipp
nt

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Joined: May 2nd, 2005, 6:34 am

October 6th, 2011, 5:31 am #7

Go check Bernhards blog for all info & more pictures...

Here's the text

" My father would often talk about the hard life as a farmer during the.....when World War II started he enlisted in the Navy.
During that time he completed his depression years....


.... This made him eligible for what the military called A school
and he was sent to school to be an aircraft engine mechanic. When he completed that training
he was assigned to a PBY submarine hunter squadron. For the second half of World War II the
squadron was assigned to Galapagos Island. He used to pronounce the islands name as Gal o
peg-us. It took a while to figure out what island he was talking about. He would tell stories about
spending the endless isolated hours riding the tortoises .....

His next duty station was some time around the beginning of 1947 and was a very short stint in
China just before they closed their doors to all other nations.

From there he left the Navy and returned to Wisconsin to go back into family farming. It only took
six months to realise he was no longer a farmer.

He re-enlisted in the Navy. Because of his mechanical background and good record he was sent to
Jet Engine school. You need to understand that is was the newest type of engines being introduced
into the military and he was in on the ground floor for maintenance and repair. While in school at
Pratt & Whitney in Connecticut he met and married my mother. That is a story all unto itself. After
completing Jet school he was assigned to an A3 Sky Warrior squadron station in Maine. Late in
1953 he was assigned to the Naval air station in Africa. I was just a youngster when my father and
family were stationed at Port Lyaute (now Kenitra) Morocco. The Navy was kind enough to allow
my farther to travel with the family on the Atlantic crossing. That was an auspicious moment in
our familys history because the A3 aircraft he was to be on crashed at sea with all hands lost.


Port Lyaute in the 1950's


I have a very limited knowledge of his actual duties while at this station. He would never talk
about what he did. He would say that they were flying missions over the coast and up to Gibraltar
keeping and eye on shipping and submarine activity. By this time my father was not only an
engine mechanic but the enlisted plane captain and part of the flight crew. I am sure this was
because he could identify and fix aircraft problems both while in flight and on the ground.

My mother became pregnant with my younger sister while stationed at Port Lyaute. This also was
when my father started wearing the Rolex. Later in life when I asked him where got the watch he
would only say in Port Lyaute. My mother would say she won it in a Bingo game. I think this was
a diversion because my father never talked about what he did. My mother knew that I would talk
about my fathers new watch and I am sure she hoped that is the story I would tell. She was right;
it was not until much after her death that my father would talk a little about Port Lyaute. What I
gathered is my mother was terrified of his flights with that squadron. That while the wars were
over, she considered the missions my father was flying extremely risky.

My mother could not wait to get out of Africa, and in 1955 the squadron was assigned to a little
base known Naval Air Station Chincoteague on the eastern shore of Virginia. Today it is called
Wallops Island Flight Center and is part of NASA. .....


........During that time I sat with my father and we talked about his youth, his Wisconsin family, my mother and his career.
When I asked about the watch and Africa he would not go into great detail other that it was not a
nice place to live. When I asked how he got the watch he would only say what did your mother
tell you.

When I asked about Naval Air Station Chincoteague he was more talkative. At that time he was
still attached to the squadron with the A3. By this time they only had one or two planes left in
the squadron and they were assigned to the Navy Flight Test in Patuxant River. He told me that
they were working with dropping shapes. When I asked what that meant the story he told was
amazing. The shape was an empty atomic bomb. It had all the parts except the explosive. In it
place there were scientific instrumentations. The plane would fly various missions depending on
what was being tested. Some times the drops were both high and low level used to help develop
better radar detection protocol for the Wallops Island radar station. Most of the time the shapes
were used to gather information about very high altitude entry or re-entry tests. They wanted to
learn what would happen to the shape and the equipment as it fell tens of thousands of feet from
subzero temperatures. He would talk about how cold his station near the bomb bay doors was.
Bitter cold would have been considered warm by the way my father talked about his adventures.
My fathers job was not only to make sure all the mechanical systems worked but to record times
and related information as speed, altitude, time to arm and drop, time to clear the probable blast
zone and how time changed if adjustments were made to any of the shapes parameters.

A3:


In 1959 the Navy no longer needed that program and my father was reassigned to aircraft carrier
out of Alameda Naval base near San Francisco. From 1959 until 1963 we did not see much of my
father. He would be on board the aircraft carrier Ranger and at sea 7 to 9 months a year. During
this time he became a Chief. This promotion sent him back to a Pratt and Whitney and Navy A
school where he learned how to service and repair A4 Sky Hawks. The sky Hawk was one of the
Navys smallest fighter/bomber to be able to deliver an atomic weapon. After his schooling the
family was transferred to La Moore Naval Air Station where he became the Master Chief for Attack
Squadron 93. Again during this time he was stationed aboard the USS Ranger and gone 7 to 9
months yearly. When he was home the squadron would be on the road several weeks at a time.
He never said where they were going but a map will show the ultra secret Area 51was just a few
hundred miles over the mountains. Just to put things in prospective in the early 1960s Le Moore
was just a small base in the middle of a big desert. The only thing we ever saw was cactus, bugs
and snakes and lots and lots of sand.

In 1963 my fathers final assignment was at Oceana Naval Air Station in Virginia Beach Virginia.
Here he was the Senior Master Chief until his retirement in 1965.


USS Ranger

........ One of the projects my father was most proud of was when the Navy was
having problems with launching Tomcats from a carrier. The pilot would run the engines to full
power and the cat would launch the aircraft. The fuel system was so sophisticated that it would
read the acceleration and adjust fuel flow accordingly. Unfortunately when the aircraft left the end
of the carrier it would decelerate and start to drop toward the ocean. The navy lost several aircraft
this way and a team was developed at the NARF & P&W to solve the problem. The final solution
at my fathers suggestion- put a landing gear over ride switch in. This would not let the fuel control
take over until the landing gear was up and locked. Problem solved, from a quite simple man who
understood jet engines and airplanes.

It was while he was working at the NARF that my father stopped wearing his Rolex. It sat on top
of our refrigerator for years. When I asked him why he was no longer wearing it, he told me it
was too dangerous to wear at the NARF, that there were to many places that would crush it on his
wrist or it could get caught and drag his hand into a moving part or machine.
From that time on my father only occasionally wore his Rolex. In his later years he said it was to
heavy on his wrist. It was during that time that I asked if he would allow me to have it as part of
my inheritance. He was never a man of opulence or jewellery and never realized the intrinsic or
monetary value of his Rolex. He said I could have it any time I wanted it.


When G. and I were talking about sailing around the world I asked my father if I could take the
watch. He gladly passed it on to me. As I stated earlier I considered having it refurbished. I knew
its value only as part of my life. I did not have it refurbished because I did not feel comfortable
sending it off and taking the chance on something being changed out of the watch.

...... In November of 2008 I wore the watch as I and 3 other men sailed Elusion (our HR 49 sailboat)
to Tortola in the British Virgin Islands. It was a 9 ½ day offshore trip in which I wore the watch
the entire time. The seas were big and the winds were strong. Wind speed averaged 35 knots and
wave height 5 to 8 meters on average. I chose the 12 midnight to 3 am watch as that best fit my
circadian rhythms. There were several nights when standing watch that I would look out over the
star filled silvery sea and think of my father. Hoping he was looking down on me saying, Kirt is
finally living his dream. At the end the race when times were corrected for handicap Elusion was
the overall winner. That was a wonderful start for our sailing adventure.

By the following February G. was ready to sail and we began a 3 year exploration of the
Leeward and Windward Islands. We explored every island from Grenada to the Bahamas ......

If the Rolex could talk it would tell a great story I am sure, from....Africa to Grenada and all across the United States with G. and me, and around the world with my father."


Rg.Philipp
These watches are just fabulous, and their historical background too.

Thanks for sharing.

Best,

Nicolas.

PS: If only you could post more pics of this beauty!!!



PS2: Can I save them in my HD, and use them?
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Joined: January 4th, 2008, 2:49 pm

October 6th, 2011, 5:40 am #8

nt
in hands of this watch are translucent, like tissue paper!

Lovely, lovely stuff!

Ross
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Joined: February 25th, 2010, 10:51 pm

October 6th, 2011, 8:43 am #9

I like to share some wonderfull pictures Bernhard made of untouched 6200 lume...



























Together with B' 5510... with second generation lume...





Rg.Philipp
Philipp & Bernhard,

FANTASTIC Pair !!!!!

Thanks for sharing


Regards
Andrew
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Joined: September 8th, 2003, 7:26 am

October 6th, 2011, 9:06 am #10

I like to share some wonderfull pictures Bernhard made of untouched 6200 lume...



























Together with B' 5510... with second generation lume...





Rg.Philipp
... from one of the nicest 6200 I have seen in real !! Both BCs are just a pleasure !!! Thanks for sharing, my friends !!

BEST!
Werner
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