Oyster Perpetual Date

Vintage Rolex Discussion

Oyster Perpetual Date

Joined: November 26th, 2011, 1:46 pm

November 26th, 2011, 5:36 pm #1

Hi all

I have inherited my father's rolex. I believe it to be a model 1500. The date is non quick set and it has a tapered Oyster style bracelet. The DATE is like this " - DATE - ".

I am trying to date it. My mother says that my father was given it for his 21st birthday ie 1951 but I am not sure that he had it then. I have seem a similar picture and that one was described as a 1959 Ostyer Perpetual Date model 1500 and Cal 1750.

The picture of it is shown below.

Hopefully someone can confirm the model etc and a better idea of it's age.



Many thanks

Nigel
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figcar
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figcar
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Joined: August 14th, 2003, 3:20 pm

November 26th, 2011, 6:15 pm #2

this watch...both the dial style and the chronometer rating are from later. I'd place the watch in the early to mid sixties. Yes a 1500...with either the 1560 or 1570 movement...and often the 1560 movements received 1570 parts in later services. Thoug not a rare or coveted model, because of the personal history the watch becomes irreplaceable. I'd give it a full service and enjoy wearing it for another 20 or so years.

John Ireland
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Joined: November 26th, 2011, 1:46 pm

November 26th, 2011, 10:03 pm #3

Rolex reply

Thanks very much for your quick & thoughtful response and you are quite right - the watch is very special to me for obvious reasons. As a young boy, I remember my dad talking about the special water proof qualities of a Rolex and I marvelled at them.

Not quite sure why you mentioned 20 years - is it the watch or it's new owner that you think will wear out - More seriously, what did you mean by ' Chronometer rating ' - where is that to be found on the watch.

Tree further questions if I may as I would welcome the experience of the members of the Forum.

First - should I get the watch serviced at Rolex or an independent ( John Watson in South Molton Street for example has been mentioned to me ). I have no documentation about the watch.

Second and more importantly, if I am given the choice should I or should I not replace the watch face with a new identical original one ? What do people normally do? Is there a 'done' thing? I am not sure myself, as the watch has a certain charm as it is but the face is rather marked.

Third - is their a good source of information about Rolex's history that you can point me to ?

Thanks for all your help.
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Joined: May 28th, 2007, 5:43 pm

November 26th, 2011, 10:16 pm #4

Sort of a conversational term. There is no reason that watch can't last indefinitely really...I wear Rolex from the 1930's all the time that keep as good of time as they did when they were new.

The interesting thing is...the watch has probably had some moisture in it ...this has caused the dial to discolor. The one thing that your father spoke to you about

They are quite water resistant and that model can be as it was when new....but the gaskets do dry out and parts like the crown and tube do wear...causing issues if not serviced regularly.

On that watch I would suspect a crown gasket or case tube gasket was bad at some juncture.

I like the dial and I would leave it...unless it bothers you.

If you are in Britain....Bexley would likely service that for you. They might require you to change the dial. Someone from there who has used them might know better.

They would do a bang up job with a 2 year warranty and the watch would appear as new.

On a watch like that...I wouldn't be nearly as critical on things as say a more collectible Submariner from the same era.

The case has probably never been polished. It is a dressier watch. If Rolex does it, it will be nearly undetectable and look as a new one in the jeweler's counter.

They have all of the necessary parts and will change them as they see that they need to be changed...making the watch virtually to spec again (not that it likely needs any parts and not that a good independent couldn't render equal service.)

Rolex service from London is very good from what I hear and there is some confidence in that for a person new to the Rolex game.

James Dowling's book Best of Times is a good overview of the history of Rolex...though nothing is all inclusive or 100% accurate. It has a lot of good information in a single space.

Good luck with the 1500. It's very cool!
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figcar
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figcar
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Joined: August 14th, 2003, 3:20 pm

November 27th, 2011, 5:48 am #5

Rolex reply

Thanks very much for your quick & thoughtful response and you are quite right - the watch is very special to me for obvious reasons. As a young boy, I remember my dad talking about the special water proof qualities of a Rolex and I marvelled at them.

Not quite sure why you mentioned 20 years - is it the watch or it's new owner that you think will wear out - More seriously, what did you mean by ' Chronometer rating ' - where is that to be found on the watch.

Tree further questions if I may as I would welcome the experience of the members of the Forum.

First - should I get the watch serviced at Rolex or an independent ( John Watson in South Molton Street for example has been mentioned to me ). I have no documentation about the watch.

Second and more importantly, if I am given the choice should I or should I not replace the watch face with a new identical original one ? What do people normally do? Is there a 'done' thing? I am not sure myself, as the watch has a certain charm as it is but the face is rather marked.

Third - is their a good source of information about Rolex's history that you can point me to ?

Thanks for all your help.
on the lower half of the dial...the four words...Superlative Chronometer Officially Certified. Only Rolexes whose movments have been certified by the independent Swiss testing agency can put that on the dial. Lesser movements might just say Precision or Super Precision or nothing at all. Earlier models used the term Officially Certified Chronometer.

I'd also keep the dial and hands as they are...the rest when fully serviced will make the watch seem like when your father first saw it. Best wishes wearing it and enjoying it.

John Ireland
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Joined: November 26th, 2011, 1:46 pm

December 5th, 2011, 6:48 pm #6


I have been undertaking some further research by reviewing other posts related to vintage rolex both on this forum ( and dare I say it another ), and also reviewing some of the information on the web. I will come to the servicing question in a separate post but I have found out the exact model and it has thrown up an interesting result which I guess is probably down to Rolex's idiosyncrasies, which I am beginning to realise do exist........

I went to the Rolex HQ in London and whilst there an extremely helpful technician took off by bracelet ( my tools at home hadn't been good enough ) and advised that the model number is a 5700 which seems not to be a Perpetual Date but an Airking Date model ! Serial number is 137xxxx, which he said puts it at between 1958 & 1959 and on the reference table that I have seen puts it as 1959 being the year of manufacture.

The dial clearly shows this watch as being an Oyster Perpetual Date and a 1500 model. I would have been very surprised if my father had had the dial changed - he just wouldn't have done that sort of thing.

Could Rolex have put a Perpetual Date into an Airking model case? I guess there is no reason why not?

So does anyone have any thoughts on the matter pleaser or come across something similar ?

Thanks

Nigel
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Joined: November 26th, 2011, 1:46 pm

December 5th, 2011, 7:09 pm #7

see subject line
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