Can anyone answer this question?

Vintage Rolex Discussion

Can anyone answer this question?

Joined: September 1st, 2011, 4:45 am

July 17th, 2012, 11:30 pm #1

What is the current price range for a 1019 like the ones pictured a few posts down?

Just wondering how hard to kick myself since I was once given two of them, but past them on to others.

Thanks
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 6th, 2007, 5:05 pm

July 18th, 2012, 12:07 am #2

I would guess 20k USD give or take 5k in either direction depending on condition. But I do not have one for sale or I would say more and I'm not looking to buy one or I would say less. So a perfect unpolished complete set could go for twice that in an auction setting I'm just a collector that buys and sells take my opinion for what you paid for it.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 14th, 2003, 3:20 pm

July 18th, 2012, 12:21 am #3

What is the current price range for a 1019 like the ones pictured a few posts down?

Just wondering how hard to kick myself since I was once given two of them, but past them on to others.

Thanks
to complain about if someone offers you something you don't want...you're not out any money...and if you give it away you are still not out any money. Sort of like a date with an ugly girl that you don't show up for.

The Milgauss was a tool watch whose time never came. The hands would have worked on an Qyster Quartz, the red tipped second hand would have worked on Turnographs and Daytonas, the case is basically a 1016, the oyster bracelet is an oyster bracelet. The main feature of being magnet-proof may have had minor applications in extreme environments but it is of little value to most people. Having nothing else to recommend it, the Milgauss is probably best known as one of Rolex's engineering/marketing failures...and that may be the biggest reason for its latter day popularity. At the other end of the spectrum is another watch with little if any real world practicality...the Sea Dweller...however that watch rode to market on the shoulders of a genuine Rolex icon, the Submariner...a watch that earned its status the old fashioned way, by working for it.

Other iconic flops from Rolex include the Tru-beat, the Super Oyster, the YachtMaster II, and the OysterQuartz. Not that these watches don't have their fans...they just never qualified as true successes. Will the new Supersized Rolexes become the new norm, or will they become example of horlogical obesity and go the way of trans fats.

As Robert Pirsig discussed in the admended forward to "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintanence," the future seems to come at us from behind while the past lies spread out before us.

John Ireland
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 1st, 2011, 4:45 am

July 18th, 2012, 1:53 am #4

What is the current price range for a 1019 like the ones pictured a few posts down?

Just wondering how hard to kick myself since I was once given two of them, but past them on to others.

Thanks
In 1972 I was the chief scientist of a NASA funded project to investigate the application of data from the first earth resources satellite (ERTS-1) to coastal fisheries. I needed some way for my field crew on three vessels to accurately time sampling since the vessels lacked chronometers. I approached Rolex to provide chronometers and they gave me a GMT Master and two Milgauss. Their interest was to compare the performance of the Milgaus vs. the GMT in a machinery intensive environment. As I recall they were evaluating whether to upgrade the magnetic protection of the GMT in the increasingly electronic environment of jet aircraft.

At the end of the field season I gave the two Milgauss to others involved in the work and kept the GMT.

Of course if I had been prescient I would have kept those two watches, and not later sold the GMT; or my red sub in the 1980s, or for that matter the PCG 5512or13 (I don't know which it was) that I bought in 1963 as my dive watch, but sold in 1969. Too late smart too soon old.

Al

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 17th, 2011, 5:43 am

July 18th, 2012, 2:26 am #5

Cool story- Tool watches being used as intended- NT..
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 18th, 2009, 12:35 pm

July 18th, 2012, 2:27 am #6

In 1972 I was the chief scientist of a NASA funded project to investigate the application of data from the first earth resources satellite (ERTS-1) to coastal fisheries. I needed some way for my field crew on three vessels to accurately time sampling since the vessels lacked chronometers. I approached Rolex to provide chronometers and they gave me a GMT Master and two Milgauss. Their interest was to compare the performance of the Milgaus vs. the GMT in a machinery intensive environment. As I recall they were evaluating whether to upgrade the magnetic protection of the GMT in the increasingly electronic environment of jet aircraft.

At the end of the field season I gave the two Milgauss to others involved in the work and kept the GMT.

Of course if I had been prescient I would have kept those two watches, and not later sold the GMT; or my red sub in the 1980s, or for that matter the PCG 5512or13 (I don't know which it was) that I bought in 1963 as my dive watch, but sold in 1969. Too late smart too soon old.

Al
Wow..... What a story!

It'll be a hard one to beat.

Thanks for sharing.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 17th, 2011, 5:43 am

July 18th, 2012, 2:27 am #7

In 1972 I was the chief scientist of a NASA funded project to investigate the application of data from the first earth resources satellite (ERTS-1) to coastal fisheries. I needed some way for my field crew on three vessels to accurately time sampling since the vessels lacked chronometers. I approached Rolex to provide chronometers and they gave me a GMT Master and two Milgauss. Their interest was to compare the performance of the Milgaus vs. the GMT in a machinery intensive environment. As I recall they were evaluating whether to upgrade the magnetic protection of the GMT in the increasingly electronic environment of jet aircraft.

At the end of the field season I gave the two Milgauss to others involved in the work and kept the GMT.

Of course if I had been prescient I would have kept those two watches, and not later sold the GMT; or my red sub in the 1980s, or for that matter the PCG 5512or13 (I don't know which it was) that I bought in 1963 as my dive watch, but sold in 1969. Too late smart too soon old.

Al
Cool story- Tool watches being used as intended- NT..
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 8th, 2008, 4:25 pm

July 18th, 2012, 4:20 am #8

In 1972 I was the chief scientist of a NASA funded project to investigate the application of data from the first earth resources satellite (ERTS-1) to coastal fisheries. I needed some way for my field crew on three vessels to accurately time sampling since the vessels lacked chronometers. I approached Rolex to provide chronometers and they gave me a GMT Master and two Milgauss. Their interest was to compare the performance of the Milgaus vs. the GMT in a machinery intensive environment. As I recall they were evaluating whether to upgrade the magnetic protection of the GMT in the increasingly electronic environment of jet aircraft.

At the end of the field season I gave the two Milgauss to others involved in the work and kept the GMT.

Of course if I had been prescient I would have kept those two watches, and not later sold the GMT; or my red sub in the 1980s, or for that matter the PCG 5512or13 (I don't know which it was) that I bought in 1963 as my dive watch, but sold in 1969. Too late smart too soon old.

Al
We would love to see them if you have any.

Thanks,
Michael M.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 1st, 2011, 4:45 am

July 18th, 2012, 4:43 am #9

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 1st, 2011, 4:45 am

July 18th, 2012, 5:13 am #10

We would love to see them if you have any.

Thanks,
Michael M.
with a gold coin taken during the salvage of a galleon off the Florida coast. The gold coin wasn't part of my share, but I do have some silver coins. Wish I still had the watch!

Quote
Like
Share