Anyone care to give an opinion on this colour of gold? >>

Vintage Rolex Discussion

Anyone care to give an opinion on this colour of gold? >>

2wsxcde3
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2wsxcde3
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Joined: October 29th, 2006, 10:37 am

December 5th, 2011, 11:48 am #1

Everyone knows the existence of White Gold, Yellow Gold and Rose Gold. I have asked before and it seems that everyone I speak to believes that these are the only 3 that Rolex produced.

However I keep being taunted by one of my 1802. To me it appears to be much lighter than the normal indicating that it is Pink Gold and not Rose.

I know many think that it is the different term for the same thing but Pink has a lighter copper mix than Rose and I am absolutely sure these two are completely different shades.

I've not seen another the same same so I am wondering, is this just a freak odd colour when it was produced? or can we accept that there were 4 colours of gold produced and not 3?

Anyone care to give an oppinion?

Steve

FROM WIKI:
Although the names are often used interchangeably, the difference between red, rose, and pink gold is the copper content the higher the copper content, the stronger the red coloration.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rose_gold# ... _pink_gold

Last edited by 2wsxcde3 on December 5th, 2011, 12:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 3rd, 2006, 5:44 pm

December 5th, 2011, 12:09 pm #2

Are they from the same time and place...? (nt)
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2wsxcde3
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2wsxcde3
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December 5th, 2011, 12:14 pm #3

the same place yes. As for the same time the RG1803 is an earlier watch by a few years.

I did however scrub both watches before I took the picture to make sure nothing was distorted by tarnish.


Steve
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Detlev333
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Detlev333
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December 5th, 2011, 12:19 pm #4

Everyone knows the existence of White Gold, Yellow Gold and Rose Gold. I have asked before and it seems that everyone I speak to believes that these are the only 3 that Rolex produced.

However I keep being taunted by one of my 1802. To me it appears to be much lighter than the normal indicating that it is Pink Gold and not Rose.

I know many think that it is the different term for the same thing but Pink has a lighter copper mix than Rose and I am absolutely sure these two are completely different shades.

I've not seen another the same same so I am wondering, is this just a freak odd colour when it was produced? or can we accept that there were 4 colours of gold produced and not 3?

Anyone care to give an oppinion?

Steve

FROM WIKI:
Although the names are often used interchangeably, the difference between red, rose, and pink gold is the copper content the higher the copper content, the stronger the red coloration.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rose_gold# ... _pink_gold

Don't think there is necessarily a 4th colour but that the copper/gold mixture has differed over time (together with the silver or zinc added for hardness and durability/protection against oxidaytion and tarnish)

Or maybe one is 9K , did you have them checked by a jeweler? LOL

Beauties Steve!

Ciao, D
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2wsxcde3
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2wsxcde3
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Joined: October 29th, 2006, 10:37 am

December 5th, 2011, 12:31 pm #5

So I'm not sure it's a time thing.

The difficulty is that if they are not cleaned then the oxidation can distort and make them look different shades. But when cleaned back equally as I have done here these are definitely different starting colours.

I know for sure Omega had at least 3 shades of pink, rose and red.

I have a sneaky feeling Rolex had 2 and it has gone largely unnoticed. I am glad and not shocked that you had noticed this difference too.

Cheers,

Steve

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fatboyharris
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Joined: July 9th, 2004, 2:59 pm

December 5th, 2011, 12:44 pm #6

Everyone knows the existence of White Gold, Yellow Gold and Rose Gold. I have asked before and it seems that everyone I speak to believes that these are the only 3 that Rolex produced.

However I keep being taunted by one of my 1802. To me it appears to be much lighter than the normal indicating that it is Pink Gold and not Rose.

I know many think that it is the different term for the same thing but Pink has a lighter copper mix than Rose and I am absolutely sure these two are completely different shades.

I've not seen another the same same so I am wondering, is this just a freak odd colour when it was produced? or can we accept that there were 4 colours of gold produced and not 3?

Anyone care to give an oppinion?

Steve

FROM WIKI:
Although the names are often used interchangeably, the difference between red, rose, and pink gold is the copper content the higher the copper content, the stronger the red coloration.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rose_gold# ... _pink_gold

been a worldwide copper shortage leading to changes in application and changes in mixes.

At one point copper was in such short suppy in the 70's that eg water/central heating traditionally done in copper piping had to resort to the use of steel pipes with resultant problems of corrosion later on.

I know from experience as I had to completely replumb a cottage pulling out steel piping put in during the copper shortage and putting back copper.

It may explain some of the difference from time to time, beside changes in mix, purity and copper sources.

regards

John
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2wsxcde3
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2wsxcde3
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December 5th, 2011, 12:56 pm #7

that Rolex could have got cheap during the copper crisis. But surely saving on a weeny bit of loot on buying copper wouldn't have made much difference on a majority gold item?

here is an old picture (in bad light) of the same watch next to an very close serial same era RG1803.

I am starting to sense between you and Detlev, there maybe just a bunch of freak and non consistent colours out there and Rolex unwittingly produced variations ranging from Red to pink completely by accident.

Cheers,

Steve


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MC Yoon
MC Yoon

December 5th, 2011, 1:06 pm #8

Everyone knows the existence of White Gold, Yellow Gold and Rose Gold. I have asked before and it seems that everyone I speak to believes that these are the only 3 that Rolex produced.

However I keep being taunted by one of my 1802. To me it appears to be much lighter than the normal indicating that it is Pink Gold and not Rose.

I know many think that it is the different term for the same thing but Pink has a lighter copper mix than Rose and I am absolutely sure these two are completely different shades.

I've not seen another the same same so I am wondering, is this just a freak odd colour when it was produced? or can we accept that there were 4 colours of gold produced and not 3?

Anyone care to give an oppinion?

Steve

FROM WIKI:
Although the names are often used interchangeably, the difference between red, rose, and pink gold is the copper content the higher the copper content, the stronger the red coloration.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rose_gold# ... _pink_gold

One is 14k gold; and the other 18k? The difference will represent the base metals in the alloy. So, maybe, 14k gold will have more copper vis a vis gold, and therefore look more "copperish". Ask Igor ; he shoud know; he is a jeweller.
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fatboyharris
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Joined: July 9th, 2004, 2:59 pm

December 5th, 2011, 1:41 pm #9

that Rolex could have got cheap during the copper crisis. But surely saving on a weeny bit of loot on buying copper wouldn't have made much difference on a majority gold item?

here is an old picture (in bad light) of the same watch next to an very close serial same era RG1803.

I am starting to sense between you and Detlev, there maybe just a bunch of freak and non consistent colours out there and Rolex unwittingly produced variations ranging from Red to pink completely by accident.

Cheers,

Steve

in relation to copper prices. It wasn't just a case of cost, there wasn't enough supply and I believe there was a prioritisation of its use for wiring etc.

During this time vehicle radiators which had traditionally been made in copper and brass switched to aluminium. Volkswagen when switching from air cooled cars had to recognise the difficulties of copper shortages and the impact that would have on supplies so decided to make the radiators from aluminium, besides a cost advantage over copper it gave them greater assurance over future raw material supplies.

regards

John
Last edited by fatboyharris on December 5th, 2011, 1:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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2wsxcde3
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2wsxcde3
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December 5th, 2011, 3:26 pm #10

I really cannot see how any fluctuation in copper prices/ratios would really effect Rolex decision to cut down on the copper content. Bearing in mind Gold and copper move pretty much in the same corolation even if there were a shift the price difference ratio it would be minimal. Sorry to be a pedant but you asked the question so here goes...

The maths at today's heady prices:

spot copper @ $3.60/lb

/16 = 22.5cents/oz

spot gold @ $1,730/oz = Gold to copper ratio of 7688:1

That is to say an 1803 total gold content value (on a bracelet) right now today is USD$4,166 if the other 25% were pure copper (which it isn't) the total copper content would be worth ... $0.18cents!!

And that 18 cents is gonna be about double than the peak 1975 price (inflation adjusted - the actual would have been much lower at the time)

I think the colour difference in these watches is not due to copper shortages. Watches are just to tiny compared to a house's plumbing or wiring to make a difference to a serious manufacturer.

Either Rolex did it on purpose and there are 3 definite colours or they were just sloppy and colour consistency wasn't important to them.

besties

Steve


Last edited by 2wsxcde3 on December 5th, 2011, 3:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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