1675 GMT owners, please help!

Vintage Rolex Discussion

1675 GMT owners, please help!

Joined: March 29th, 2011, 5:30 pm

September 5th, 2011, 1:17 am #1

Alright, this is a totally newb question, and one that almost deserves wearing a helmet before asking to protect myself from the smack up-side the head I'll get but here goes.

I am going to be upgrading my collection to have GMT in the near future. I currently wear an Omega Seamaster 300 GMT to work, and feel it is more appropriate to wear the watch designed by Rolex for Juan Trippe and Pan Am. While not the original, I love the 1675.

But recently, someone was trying to tell me that on a 1675, there is no way to independently set the GMT apart from the hour hand. And I'm not talking about the jumping hand feature of the the Master II either.

His stance was that if, for example, the watch had the hands installed in such a way that at 11:00 am, the GMT hand happened to point at 10 on the bezel (or 5 on the face), that's the way the watch was ALWAYS going to be. If you reset the time because the watch stopped or you moved into a new time zone, the GMT hand would have to follow along. He maintained that the ONLY way to track GMT was to move the bezel so the GMT hand pointed to the correct UTC hour on the bezel.

I can't believe this to be true. I can believe that as you set the hour, the GMT hand would follow along because of the gearing, but I have to believe there would be a way to then move the GMT hand independently from the hour hand to put it back on the correct UTC time WITHOUT rotating the bezel.

Or am I just plain wrong?
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Joined: May 28th, 2007, 5:43 pm

September 5th, 2011, 1:42 am #2

You need a GMT II to do what you want I think.
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Joined: April 21st, 2007, 10:15 am

September 5th, 2011, 7:11 am #3

Alright, this is a totally newb question, and one that almost deserves wearing a helmet before asking to protect myself from the smack up-side the head I'll get but here goes.

I am going to be upgrading my collection to have GMT in the near future. I currently wear an Omega Seamaster 300 GMT to work, and feel it is more appropriate to wear the watch designed by Rolex for Juan Trippe and Pan Am. While not the original, I love the 1675.

But recently, someone was trying to tell me that on a 1675, there is no way to independently set the GMT apart from the hour hand. And I'm not talking about the jumping hand feature of the the Master II either.

His stance was that if, for example, the watch had the hands installed in such a way that at 11:00 am, the GMT hand happened to point at 10 on the bezel (or 5 on the face), that's the way the watch was ALWAYS going to be. If you reset the time because the watch stopped or you moved into a new time zone, the GMT hand would have to follow along. He maintained that the ONLY way to track GMT was to move the bezel so the GMT hand pointed to the correct UTC hour on the bezel.

I can't believe this to be true. I can believe that as you set the hour, the GMT hand would follow along because of the gearing, but I have to believe there would be a way to then move the GMT hand independently from the hour hand to put it back on the correct UTC time WITHOUT rotating the bezel.

Or am I just plain wrong?
you are indeed wrong...
The bezel in combination with the 24 hour hand gives the "independent" feature, by adjusting the bezel.
The bezel can be seen as another dial, and the hand for that dial is the gmt hand. Whether you set the hand on a watch, or the dial, that is not important. Important is that you can set this combination to which ever hour-time you want, and that serves the purpose.

What you are looking for is a watch with an independably movable gmt hand, and that watch then does not need a bezel with hours on it at all.
But Rolex never made that one...

It however brings me to the point to question: is the 1655/16550 a watch type that fully lives up to the promise?

best,
Robbe
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Joined: September 3rd, 2011, 8:45 am

September 5th, 2011, 8:37 am #4

Alright, this is a totally newb question, and one that almost deserves wearing a helmet before asking to protect myself from the smack up-side the head I'll get but here goes.

I am going to be upgrading my collection to have GMT in the near future. I currently wear an Omega Seamaster 300 GMT to work, and feel it is more appropriate to wear the watch designed by Rolex for Juan Trippe and Pan Am. While not the original, I love the 1675.

But recently, someone was trying to tell me that on a 1675, there is no way to independently set the GMT apart from the hour hand. And I'm not talking about the jumping hand feature of the the Master II either.

His stance was that if, for example, the watch had the hands installed in such a way that at 11:00 am, the GMT hand happened to point at 10 on the bezel (or 5 on the face), that's the way the watch was ALWAYS going to be. If you reset the time because the watch stopped or you moved into a new time zone, the GMT hand would have to follow along. He maintained that the ONLY way to track GMT was to move the bezel so the GMT hand pointed to the correct UTC hour on the bezel.

I can't believe this to be true. I can believe that as you set the hour, the GMT hand would follow along because of the gearing, but I have to believe there would be a way to then move the GMT hand independently from the hour hand to put it back on the correct UTC time WITHOUT rotating the bezel.

Or am I just plain wrong?
Yes, there is no way to independently move the GMT hand on a 1675. You have to move the bezel in order to tell time in a different time zone. Actually this makes more sense than an independent GMT hand. If both the bezel and the GMT hand moved, then it would be rather confusing.

Personally though, I find the Explorer II 16550 and 16570 a better GMT / travelling watch. The bezel is fixed and you move the hour hand depending on the time zone you are in. The GMT hand keeps track of "home time". The bezel is fixed therefore there's no danger of it getting accidentally turned and losing your bearings. This is a great complication IMHO more coherent than the GMT II where both the bezel and the hour hand move.
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Joined: December 18th, 2010, 11:30 pm

September 5th, 2011, 9:52 am #5

Alright, this is a totally newb question, and one that almost deserves wearing a helmet before asking to protect myself from the smack up-side the head I'll get but here goes.

I am going to be upgrading my collection to have GMT in the near future. I currently wear an Omega Seamaster 300 GMT to work, and feel it is more appropriate to wear the watch designed by Rolex for Juan Trippe and Pan Am. While not the original, I love the 1675.

But recently, someone was trying to tell me that on a 1675, there is no way to independently set the GMT apart from the hour hand. And I'm not talking about the jumping hand feature of the the Master II either.

His stance was that if, for example, the watch had the hands installed in such a way that at 11:00 am, the GMT hand happened to point at 10 on the bezel (or 5 on the face), that's the way the watch was ALWAYS going to be. If you reset the time because the watch stopped or you moved into a new time zone, the GMT hand would have to follow along. He maintained that the ONLY way to track GMT was to move the bezel so the GMT hand pointed to the correct UTC hour on the bezel.

I can't believe this to be true. I can believe that as you set the hour, the GMT hand would follow along because of the gearing, but I have to believe there would be a way to then move the GMT hand independently from the hour hand to put it back on the correct UTC time WITHOUT rotating the bezel.

Or am I just plain wrong?
My 1675 is my third GMT, and the first on which the 24-hour hand can't be set independently. I was surprised, but not concerned (as I didn't buy it for the functionality).
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Joined: March 29th, 2011, 5:30 pm

September 5th, 2011, 10:18 am #6

Alright, this is a totally newb question, and one that almost deserves wearing a helmet before asking to protect myself from the smack up-side the head I'll get but here goes.

I am going to be upgrading my collection to have GMT in the near future. I currently wear an Omega Seamaster 300 GMT to work, and feel it is more appropriate to wear the watch designed by Rolex for Juan Trippe and Pan Am. While not the original, I love the 1675.

But recently, someone was trying to tell me that on a 1675, there is no way to independently set the GMT apart from the hour hand. And I'm not talking about the jumping hand feature of the the Master II either.

His stance was that if, for example, the watch had the hands installed in such a way that at 11:00 am, the GMT hand happened to point at 10 on the bezel (or 5 on the face), that's the way the watch was ALWAYS going to be. If you reset the time because the watch stopped or you moved into a new time zone, the GMT hand would have to follow along. He maintained that the ONLY way to track GMT was to move the bezel so the GMT hand pointed to the correct UTC hour on the bezel.

I can't believe this to be true. I can believe that as you set the hour, the GMT hand would follow along because of the gearing, but I have to believe there would be a way to then move the GMT hand independently from the hour hand to put it back on the correct UTC time WITHOUT rotating the bezel.

Or am I just plain wrong?
I am usually a very observant person (note the use of "usually"). But in all the longing looks - the hours spent pouring over various pics of "1675 porn", I never ONCE noticed that in every pic the Time and the GMT Hand matched.

DOH!

Thanks for setting me straight on this one. I still love the 1675, but I do need the true functionality of the GMT. . .*sigh

Perhaps a Master II is in my future instead.

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Joined: September 3rd, 2011, 8:45 am

September 5th, 2011, 11:53 am #7

The 1675 and the 16550. I travel extensively and having a time zone watch is definitely a useful tool. Enventually I ended up selling the GMT and keeping the Explorer II because being able to move the hour hand independently was more functional and made alot more sense to me. With the 1675 you would have to reset the time completely or read the local time on the bezel (which is not very practical). With a GMT-II this problem is solved but then there's the bezel which also moves. It never seemed coherent to me to have both a moving bezel and hour hand. One is ample. Just some food for thought.
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Joined: March 29th, 2011, 5:30 pm

September 5th, 2011, 2:02 pm #8

I need the GMT to truly be GMT because I'm a pilot. The three time zone tracking is super helpful. GMT hand - Always GMT - this is how I have to log all times on aircraft logs and duty logs. My trip sheets and company assignments are all in UTC or Zulu time. The normal hour hand - set to local, helps me keep track of what meal I should be eating . A rotating bezel so I can keep track of a third time would be great - rotate that to home base time. That way I don't wake anyone up inadvertently.

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Joined: May 4th, 2009, 8:48 pm

September 5th, 2011, 7:50 pm #9

Alright, this is a totally newb question, and one that almost deserves wearing a helmet before asking to protect myself from the smack up-side the head I'll get but here goes.

I am going to be upgrading my collection to have GMT in the near future. I currently wear an Omega Seamaster 300 GMT to work, and feel it is more appropriate to wear the watch designed by Rolex for Juan Trippe and Pan Am. While not the original, I love the 1675.

But recently, someone was trying to tell me that on a 1675, there is no way to independently set the GMT apart from the hour hand. And I'm not talking about the jumping hand feature of the the Master II either.

His stance was that if, for example, the watch had the hands installed in such a way that at 11:00 am, the GMT hand happened to point at 10 on the bezel (or 5 on the face), that's the way the watch was ALWAYS going to be. If you reset the time because the watch stopped or you moved into a new time zone, the GMT hand would have to follow along. He maintained that the ONLY way to track GMT was to move the bezel so the GMT hand pointed to the correct UTC hour on the bezel.

I can't believe this to be true. I can believe that as you set the hour, the GMT hand would follow along because of the gearing, but I have to believe there would be a way to then move the GMT hand independently from the hour hand to put it back on the correct UTC time WITHOUT rotating the bezel.

Or am I just plain wrong?
The 6542 GMT-Master of 1954 had the hour hand and the 24-hr hand permanently linked, the principle being to obtain the second time zone by rotating the bezel relative to the 24-hr hand. This continued with the 1675 in 1960. With the 16750 GMT-Master in 1981 came a quick-set date feature, and with the 16700 in 1987 a sapphire crystal was added, but as in previous GMT-Master models the hour hands were still permanently linked.

With the advent of the 16760 GMT-Master II in 1983 (there was overlap), the quick-set date feature was exchanged for the quick-set hour hand, allowing the hour hand now to be set independently of the 24-hr hand, which enabled the watch to track three time zones and be easily changed during a trip. This feature continues to the present in all GMT-Master II models.
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Joined: September 20th, 2003, 3:49 pm

September 5th, 2011, 8:44 pm #10

Yes, there is no way to independently move the GMT hand on a 1675. You have to move the bezel in order to tell time in a different time zone. Actually this makes more sense than an independent GMT hand. If both the bezel and the GMT hand moved, then it would be rather confusing.

Personally though, I find the Explorer II 16550 and 16570 a better GMT / travelling watch. The bezel is fixed and you move the hour hand depending on the time zone you are in. The GMT hand keeps track of "home time". The bezel is fixed therefore there's no danger of it getting accidentally turned and losing your bearings. This is a great complication IMHO more coherent than the GMT II where both the bezel and the hour hand move.
is infinitely more practical than a fixed bezel.

You can always move a rotating bezel to the top (zero) but you cannot move a fixed bezel.

Why move the bezel??? RELATIVE timing with respect to the minute hand (for short times) the hour hand (for longer times) or the GMT hand (for much longer times).

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