What If ??

What If ??

Joined: November 20th, 2004, 5:02 pm

March 10th, 2008, 3:01 pm #1

What if

What if the LST 391 (the original choice of the LST Memorial) was actually the one brought back to the USA rather than the LST 325? Would all of the LST Weeks be around a WWII LST? Would the banquets always be around the 40’s music? Would the tour guides make only a small mention that LSTs served in the Korean and Vietnam Wars?

Not likely in my opinion.

The LST 391 was a WWII and Korean War veteran ship. Many others built during WWII served in WWII, The Korean War, The Cuban Crisis, The Vietnam War, and other LSTs built after WWII served in the Vietnam and Gulf Wars. The need for LST’s and their work requirements were not completed in 1945 at the end of WWII.

Are we fulfilling the mission promise completely?

Mission Statement:

The mission of the USS LST Ship Memorial, Inc. is to educate its visitors to the role of the LST in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. It is our desire to preserve the memory of these ships and all the countless heroic men who died in battle during the service to their country. The names of all who died while serving on LSTs will be displayed on the ship. By preserving this priceless piece of American history, we will bring honor to the American ship building industries that produced them, the crews who served and defended them, and those who were carried onto the invasion shores by them.

Will there ever be a LST Week where these other veterans of Korea, Vietnam, The Cuban Crisis, and Gulf War are highlighted? Could there be at a future LST Week a reenactment of the Inchon Invasion (Korea) or maybe a Tonkin Gulf Yacht Club experiences like occurred in the canals of Vietnam? Or are we welded to WWII only and not fulfilling the original mission for bringing the LST back to the USA?

It doesn’t take anything away from the deserving WWII veterans or those who brought the LST back in fulfilling the original mission and highlighting the service of LSTs in all wars. In fact I believe that it would add. Would it not be an encouragement for these other veterans to attend LST Week if it highlighted their years of service?

I am not a veteran of any war, so this is not about me. However, I did serve on a LST that earned several Battle Stars and Presidential Unit Citations while in commission.

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Joined: January 17th, 2006, 3:42 am

March 10th, 2008, 3:55 pm #2

After reading your post, my feelings regarding the 325 and the 391 is like the difference between night and day. Had the 391 been brought to Evansville, the tour guides would have been schooled on the history of that particular ship. This would include the wars she served, the battles she was involved in and any other interesting information regarding the 391. This is what we, as tour guides, attempt to do with the 325.

The question as to the wars after world war two are involved, we don't directly mention them because the tours are based on the activity of the 325. The people come to see the 325 and this is what we focus on.

For sure, if the 391 was here instead of the 325, everything regarding the 391 and her activities would be mentioned and highlighted.

LST week is not just a gathering of folks interested in the 325 but it is open to all folks interested in LST's in general. Everybody is welcome.

I feel the festivities would proceed, no matter what the number of the ship is.

Larry

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Joined: December 18th, 2004, 5:09 pm

March 10th, 2008, 9:02 pm #3

What if

What if the LST 391 (the original choice of the LST Memorial) was actually the one brought back to the USA rather than the LST 325? Would all of the LST Weeks be around a WWII LST? Would the banquets always be around the 40’s music? Would the tour guides make only a small mention that LSTs served in the Korean and Vietnam Wars?

Not likely in my opinion.

The LST 391 was a WWII and Korean War veteran ship. Many others built during WWII served in WWII, The Korean War, The Cuban Crisis, The Vietnam War, and other LSTs built after WWII served in the Vietnam and Gulf Wars. The need for LST’s and their work requirements were not completed in 1945 at the end of WWII.

Are we fulfilling the mission promise completely?

Mission Statement:

The mission of the USS LST Ship Memorial, Inc. is to educate its visitors to the role of the LST in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. It is our desire to preserve the memory of these ships and all the countless heroic men who died in battle during the service to their country. The names of all who died while serving on LSTs will be displayed on the ship. By preserving this priceless piece of American history, we will bring honor to the American ship building industries that produced them, the crews who served and defended them, and those who were carried onto the invasion shores by them.

Will there ever be a LST Week where these other veterans of Korea, Vietnam, The Cuban Crisis, and Gulf War are highlighted? Could there be at a future LST Week a reenactment of the Inchon Invasion (Korea) or maybe a Tonkin Gulf Yacht Club experiences like occurred in the canals of Vietnam? Or are we welded to WWII only and not fulfilling the original mission for bringing the LST back to the USA?

It doesn’t take anything away from the deserving WWII veterans or those who brought the LST back in fulfilling the original mission and highlighting the service of LSTs in all wars. In fact I believe that it would add. Would it not be an encouragement for these other veterans to attend LST Week if it highlighted their years of service?

I am not a veteran of any war, so this is not about me. However, I did serve on a LST that earned several Battle Stars and Presidential Unit Citations while in commission.
People who tour LST 325 are told that LSTs served in various wars, and our tour guides talk about LSTs in general, LST shipyards, and other facts that hold true for all LSTs.

As far as LST Week, it is a convention for all LST folks. This is evident from the list of various LST groups who come to Evansville for LST Week, and indeed hold their convention/reunions in Evansville during other months of the year.

But Larry is right. We talk a lot about the history of LST 325 because that is what people want to hear. If you tour The USS North Carolina in Wilmington, some brief, general information is given about battleships but most of the information is about the USS North Carolina.

If you tour the USS Drum In Mobile, some info is delivered about submarines in general, but most of the information is about the Drum and not about other submarines. And it is not about later models of submarines such as the nuclear powered modern submarines.

I toured the USS Cassin Young, a WW II destroyer, when the LST was docked in Boston during the 2005 East Coast Voyage. The tour was not about all destroyers; it was about the Cassin Young. I also toured the USS Constitution in Boston Harbor. The tour guides (active duty Navy personnel) talked solely about "Old Ironsides," not other sailing warships of its era or later.

Yes, the mission of The USS LST Memorial is to honor and preserve the memory and history of all LSTs, and by having one of the LSTs with such great history and great service to our country as the 325, we do that.


Last edited by Son-of-Rosie on March 10th, 2008, 9:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 12:56 pm

March 10th, 2008, 9:29 pm #4

Be more inclusive of all lst service on that class of ship.I don't think that most of the folk's are supporting the number 325 but all of that class of ship and all the service they gave no matter when.I think that is the rub for alot of supporter's.

Bob R.
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Joined: December 18th, 2004, 5:09 pm

March 10th, 2008, 10:43 pm #5

Bob:

As I wrote in my email above, we do support all LSTs and we talk about LSTs in general on our tours. I would be willing to bet we talk more about LSTs in general than any of the other historic Navy ships talk about their class of ship.

But the 325 has a grand history of service to her country and we would be remiss if we did not cover it. We're not going to paint over the "325" on the hull as, believe or not, one LST veteran from another ship once suggested.

By doing this it doesn't mean the LST Memorial's LST is not supportive of other LSTs.

For example, this May the LST 1134 reunion group, people from many parts of the country, will gather in Evansville because an LST is here. We will hoist a banner "Welcome LST 1134" on the quarter deck and display their signal flag while they are on the ship. LST 1134 earned her battle stars during the Korean War, not WW II.

We honor all LSTs and crews of all wars and eras.
Last edited by Son-of-Rosie on March 10th, 2008, 10:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2004, 5:09 pm

March 10th, 2008, 10:56 pm #6

Be more inclusive of all lst service on that class of ship.I don't think that most of the folk's are supporting the number 325 but all of that class of ship and all the service they gave no matter when.I think that is the rub for alot of supporter's.

Bob R.
Bob:

As I wrote in my email above, we do support all LSTs and we talk about LSTs in general on our tours. I would be willing to bet we talk more about LSTs in general than any of the other historic Navy ships talk about their class of ship.

But the 325 has a grand history of service to her country and we would be remiss if we did not cover it. I rather doubt that the LST Memorial board of directors is going to consider painting over the "325" on the hull as, believe or not, one LST veteran from another ship once suggested.

This doesn't mean the LST Memorial is not supportive of other LSTs.

For example, this May the LST 1134 reunion group, people from many parts of the country, will gather in Evansville because an LST is here. We will hoist a banner "Welcome LST 1134" on the quarter deck and display their signal flag while they are on the ship. LST 1134 earned her battle stars during the Korean War, not WW II.

We honor all LSTs and crews of all wars and eras.
Last edited by Son-of-Rosie on March 10th, 2008, 10:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 19th, 2004, 5:07 pm

March 10th, 2008, 11:04 pm #7

What if

What if the LST 391 (the original choice of the LST Memorial) was actually the one brought back to the USA rather than the LST 325? Would all of the LST Weeks be around a WWII LST? Would the banquets always be around the 40’s music? Would the tour guides make only a small mention that LSTs served in the Korean and Vietnam Wars?

Not likely in my opinion.

The LST 391 was a WWII and Korean War veteran ship. Many others built during WWII served in WWII, The Korean War, The Cuban Crisis, The Vietnam War, and other LSTs built after WWII served in the Vietnam and Gulf Wars. The need for LST’s and their work requirements were not completed in 1945 at the end of WWII.

Are we fulfilling the mission promise completely?

Mission Statement:

The mission of the USS LST Ship Memorial, Inc. is to educate its visitors to the role of the LST in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. It is our desire to preserve the memory of these ships and all the countless heroic men who died in battle during the service to their country. The names of all who died while serving on LSTs will be displayed on the ship. By preserving this priceless piece of American history, we will bring honor to the American ship building industries that produced them, the crews who served and defended them, and those who were carried onto the invasion shores by them.

Will there ever be a LST Week where these other veterans of Korea, Vietnam, The Cuban Crisis, and Gulf War are highlighted? Could there be at a future LST Week a reenactment of the Inchon Invasion (Korea) or maybe a Tonkin Gulf Yacht Club experiences like occurred in the canals of Vietnam? Or are we welded to WWII only and not fulfilling the original mission for bringing the LST back to the USA?

It doesn’t take anything away from the deserving WWII veterans or those who brought the LST back in fulfilling the original mission and highlighting the service of LSTs in all wars. In fact I believe that it would add. Would it not be an encouragement for these other veterans to attend LST Week if it highlighted their years of service?

I am not a veteran of any war, so this is not about me. However, I did serve on a LST that earned several Battle Stars and Presidential Unit Citations while in commission.
I do not know where you are coming from? I served aboard LST 391 I n Normandy until we lost her when we srruct a mine . The rest is a long story. I was involved in return of LST 391 but when we were made aware that this would not come to be we the Gold Crew settled on LSt 325 our thoughts were to bring a ship home that would represent all LST'S . The only original crew of LST 391 was myself Dominick Perruso and Chief Engineer James Bartlett we did not have a problem sailing her back home. When we arrived in Mobile the former LST crews had no problem welcoming LST 325 back to the USA. and I feel this is the way most every one felt and the fact that all of the trips she has made attest to that fact plus all of the reunions. I realize this chat line is to keep people involved and aware of what is going on but inquiry I think will stir up a problem. Dominick R. Perruso Gold Crew Member
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Joined: December 20th, 2006, 7:02 pm

March 11th, 2008, 12:16 am #8

I agree with you Dom. Rocky
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Joined: December 18th, 2004, 5:09 pm

March 11th, 2008, 7:37 pm #9

What if

What if the LST 391 (the original choice of the LST Memorial) was actually the one brought back to the USA rather than the LST 325? Would all of the LST Weeks be around a WWII LST? Would the banquets always be around the 40’s music? Would the tour guides make only a small mention that LSTs served in the Korean and Vietnam Wars?

Not likely in my opinion.

The LST 391 was a WWII and Korean War veteran ship. Many others built during WWII served in WWII, The Korean War, The Cuban Crisis, The Vietnam War, and other LSTs built after WWII served in the Vietnam and Gulf Wars. The need for LST’s and their work requirements were not completed in 1945 at the end of WWII.

Are we fulfilling the mission promise completely?

Mission Statement:

The mission of the USS LST Ship Memorial, Inc. is to educate its visitors to the role of the LST in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. It is our desire to preserve the memory of these ships and all the countless heroic men who died in battle during the service to their country. The names of all who died while serving on LSTs will be displayed on the ship. By preserving this priceless piece of American history, we will bring honor to the American ship building industries that produced them, the crews who served and defended them, and those who were carried onto the invasion shores by them.

Will there ever be a LST Week where these other veterans of Korea, Vietnam, The Cuban Crisis, and Gulf War are highlighted? Could there be at a future LST Week a reenactment of the Inchon Invasion (Korea) or maybe a Tonkin Gulf Yacht Club experiences like occurred in the canals of Vietnam? Or are we welded to WWII only and not fulfilling the original mission for bringing the LST back to the USA?

It doesn’t take anything away from the deserving WWII veterans or those who brought the LST back in fulfilling the original mission and highlighting the service of LSTs in all wars. In fact I believe that it would add. Would it not be an encouragement for these other veterans to attend LST Week if it highlighted their years of service?

I am not a veteran of any war, so this is not about me. However, I did serve on a LST that earned several Battle Stars and Presidential Unit Citations while in commission.
I served aboard the USS Meeker County LST 980 for 23 months during the height of the Vietnam War. The 980 earned 9 battle stars and 2 presidential citations for her service in Vietnam. I feel a great deal of pride and respect for the 980's achievements and crew in the Vietnam War, as well as her service in Korea, WW2, and peacetime. The 325 is representative of all LST's and our tour guides (who are the best), convey the message of all LST's and their missions. WE can't talk about every LST during a tour, but I'm convinced that our tour guides do a great job in promoting all LST's. Keep up the good work.

Terry Tull
President
USS LST Ship Memorial

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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

March 11th, 2008, 10:05 pm #10

I've always heard the tour guides ask those in the tour what ship they served on, what their duties were.. and then take extra time to incorporate items into the tour to make it special for those veterans. If it's someone who served on a later T, they often talk about the differences, sometimes even teasing each other about the improvements.. ("WHAT? You had an evaporator???? No diesel in your drinking water??? An ice cream machine??? Who would have thought it!")

I was very pleased to see, last year during LST Week, those fellows from the AAFA in Evansville. MANY of them said that they would be back, and they were telling their fellow members! (Their Convention 2009 was already set, but they said they WILL be back and that is the main thing.)

Many Korean era Veterans were there - some of them members of the Ohio LST/Amphibs Association. Some sailors that served during peacetime were there - encouraging others to tell their sea tales and telling a few of their own.

The one thing that I've always been told about LST 325 is that the ship belongs to everyone - and that it takes all generations to help in whatever way they are able to keep this Memorial to our Veterans improving. Age doesn't matter, male or female, all that's required is a love for the ship and a willingness to learn. How I have learned!!! How much I still HAVE to learn!!! The Ship looks better and better each time I see her.

Thanks to all of you for all that you have done for me.. but most importantly all of our veterans.
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