Under enemy fire- 6th Special Seabees, Second Section's Echelon One at Vella Lavella

Joined: September 1st, 2018, 12:25 pm

September 1st, 2018, 12:33 pm #1

Hello, I just joined the group..My late father was a WW2 Navy Seabee who spent 27 months in the Pacific..Attached to the 3rd Marine Division they Loaded and unloaded ships on the invasion beachheads..Then moved the cargo to inland supply dumps..I thought you may like to see these two stories.

Under enemy fire- 6th Special Seabees, Second Section's Echelon One at Vella La Vella - October 1, 1943 - November 22, 1943

Second Section's Echelon One was called upon to handle cargo for 1stMAC, (First Marine Amphibious Corps) at Vella La Vella. A thirty-day supply of rations, gasoline and oil was to be stocked there. A convoy of LST’s was shipping out from Guadalcanal on September 29, to deliver more supplies and troops to the new staging base, the Sixth would help load it up and discharge it. For the first time the men would be working on an unsecured island. The men were given K-Rations and ammunition. They would go in with full combat equipment. Although the Seabees did not know it, the Japanese ground troops were not a big worry even though they were stubbornly resisting the New Zealand's Third Division's efforts to pocket them in the northwest corner of the island. The major threat was Japanese air attack. Enemy flyers bombed the staging base everyday, clearly the base anti-aircraft defenses and the combat air patrol were inadequate. The Sixth's Echelon One was responsible for loading and unloading LST 460. The trucks and drivers of Company B, First Corps motor transport battalion, a Marine unit, would assist them. Knowing that every minute their LST remained on the beach it was at serious risk of air attack the officers of Echelon One plan loaded the ship so that it could be discharged in a minimum amount of time. They knew that no LST had yet been fully unloaded in the five hours time it was allowed to stay beached at the Vella La Vella staging base, and they were determined to show that it could be done.

In a driving rainstorm on September 29, the seven LST supply convoy left Guadalcanal for Vella La Vella with Echelon One and the Marine truck drivers aboard Large Slow Target 460. At one mile from the beach the LST crews completely un-dogged their doors and ramp and unclutched the ramp motor so that when the brake was released the ramp would fall of its own weight. The men on the deck watched for enemy planes. Navy gunners hung from the straps of their 20mm cannons, eyes skyward. To beef up their anti-aircraft defense, the Sixth men deck loaded the two New Zealand 40mm Bofors anti-aircraft cannons as well as all their own 50 caliber machine gun-equipped 6x6 trucks. A few hundred yards from shore the LST's dropped their stern anchors and paid out the cables until seconds later they were crunching onto the beach. LST 460 grounded a little short of dry land, but Echelon One was prepared. As soon as their ramp splashed into the surf at 07:15, their bulldozer was disembarking immediately followed by their five-ton tractor crane. As their bulldozer pushed a coral road up to the ramp, the Marine truck drivers on the tank deck waited with their engines idling. After the first trucks rushed out the Seabees installed the LST's elevator guides and lowered the 40mm cannons to the tank deck where they were attached to their prime movers and driven ashore. The Sixth men wasted no time in getting their own 20mm cannon and truck mounted 50 caliber anti-aircraft guns emplaced in positions ashore.

While their shipmates worked the ship the Seabee gunners stood by their weapons. Inside LST 460 tank deck 32 Stevedores worked at top speed to load the returning trucks. At 09:20, less than two hours after starting, Echelon One completed unloading their LST. The now empty LST 460 pumped out its ballast and prepared to haul in its stern anchor cable and retract from the beach. The Seabees began dispersing into the jungle, where they would dig their foxholes. LST 448, beached a half mile north of Echelon One, was still unloading. Marines had charge of the operation and it was not proceeding as quickly as it should have. Echelon One sent a work detail to assist discharging LST 448. At 09:30, a large force of Japanese fighters and dive-bombers raided the staging area. One veteran recalled how he was walking on the beach to retrieve his rifle and gear and saw a"V" formation of about sixteen aircraft come out of the sun. He first thought they were allied planes, but the sudden cry "air raid" and the formation's nosing over into a dive convinced him otherwise. The Seabees and Marines ran for the cover of the jungle as the anti-aircraft guns on ship and shore sputtered to life. Some men fired their rifles at the incoming planes. Two Japanese dive-bombers swept down and released their payloads on LST 448. The men watched helplessly as the bombs fell into the beached ship. Their was a muffled explosion and the Sixth men could feel the ground tremble from the force of the blast though the exploding ship was half a mile away. Seconds after the impact of the bombs, the Sixth men took to their feet running down the beach toward LST 448. When Japanese fighters swept in and strafed the beach the 20 or so running Seabees dived into the jungle for cover, re-emerging to continue their dash as the enemy fighters passed. The Japanese planes bombed the dispersal areas too, wounding many among the work parties and gun crews. LST 448 was a twisted burning wreck when the Seabees got to her. Ammunition was exploding in her hold and magazines. Marines were helping the wounded, assisted by the Sixth's medical officer who stayed on board throughout the afternoon despite the fires, exploding ordinance and a second attack. Many men were wounded. Of the work detail the Sixth had dispatched before the raid, eight men were wounded by shrapnel, two seriously, and another could not be found at all. Though he was listed as missing in action, it was clear two days later, when 21 unidentified bodies were pulled out of the wreckage, that Echelon One had lost one of its own.

The Sixth's first experience under fire was costly, but the men did not lose their sangfroid. They dug foxholes near their work area on the beach and waited for the next supply echelon to land. The Japanese attacked intermittently throughout the day and into the night, until about 22:30. The second Japanese air strike came at 10:00 at Ruravai about two miles up the beach from where the Sixth landed and LST 334 had still not finished discharging its cargo. It sat on the shore as an inviting target. The Japanese hit it with a bomb but fortunately the damage was light. As the enemy planes swarmed over the beachhead, one Val dive bomber came hurtling across the cove at a very low altitude only to find cannon fire from the Sixth's 20mm anti-aircraft gun slamming into its nose. As the crippled plane reached the far end of the cove it suddenly exploded into pieces and fell into the sea. Later in the day the airsols (air solomoms command), combat air patrol was on station above the staging base, and they helped deflect the worst of a 60-plane raid. Some enemy bombers still got through, and LST 448 was hit again. For the Japanese pilots there was no mistaking where the beachhead was as long as smoke belched out of the burning LST 448. In the last raid of the day the Japanese scored again, destroying 5 heavy trucks and two jeeps. The violence of the air attacks on Vella La Vella that continued, vividly illustrated for Echelon One the importance of anti-aircraft guns. While on the island the Sixth set about acquiring more 20mm cannon .50 caliber machine guns, and trained men in their operation when there was spare time. The corps staging area on Vella La Vella was considered secured by October 8. Air raids continued but the anti-aircraft defenses were by then beefed up. During Echelons One's seven and a half weeks on Vella, their gunners were part of the bases anti-aircraft defense.
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Joined: September 1st, 2018, 12:25 pm

September 4th, 2018, 12:20 pm #2

Painting a WW2 PT boat veteran made for me of Vella Lavella..I know the LST didn't dock that way..He had to fit the PT boat in somewhere..
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Joined: September 1st, 2018, 12:25 pm

September 5th, 2018, 8:00 pm #3

Commendation from the Marines, for Vella Lavella and Bougainville.
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Joined: September 1st, 2018, 12:25 pm

September 6th, 2018, 11:12 am #4

HERE IS A CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN A RET. WW2 MARINE CORPS BRIG. GENERAL AND I. MY FATHERS "CB" COMPANY WAS ATTACHED TO HIS MARINE CORPS SUPPLY UNIT AT VELLA AND BOUGAINVILLE...HE WAS A GOOD E-MAIL BUDDY WHO RECENTLY PASSED AWAY..

MAY HE REST IN PEACE!

WE LANDED ON VELLA LAVELLA UNDER AERIAL ATTACK AND EXPERIENCED LIGHT CASUALTIES. WE HAD NO MAPS, BUT THERE WAS A PHOTOMONTAGE OF THE AREA AND, BY THE TIME I HAD DETERMINED THAT WE HAD LANDED 5 MILES FROM THE RIGHT BEACH, THE USS CROSBY WAS DISAPPEARING ON THE HORIZON. WE SKIRMISHED UP THE DIRT COASTAL ROAD TO THE PROPER LOCATION AND SET UP CAMP.

OUR MISSION WAS TO SET UP A FORWARD SUPPLY DEPOT TO SUPPORT A POSSIBLE FUTURE INVASION OF BOUGAINVILLE. THE NAVY WAS SUPPOSED TO SEND WEEKLY CONVOYS OF LST'S WITH SUPPLIES AND ADDITIONAL TROOPS. AMONG THE UNITS DUE TO COME ON THE FIRST LST CONVOY WAS A BATTALION OF THE FIRST MARINE PARACHUTE REGIMENT, CERTAIN ANTI-AIRCRAFT UNITS, AND YOUR FATHERS SEABEE UNIT.

(I DON'T REMEMBER WHEN LT. COL. CHURCHILL AND OTHER COMMAND ELEMENTS OF BRANCH 3, 4TH BASE DEPOT ARRIVED, BUT IT WOULD HAVE BEEN NO LATER THAN OCTOBER 1ST)

OCTOBER 1. THIS MORNING I HAD SENT WORKING TEAMS TO THE VARIOUS LANDING POINTS TO RECEIVE THE LST'S DUE TO ARRIVE. I WAS IN MY JEEP JUST SOUTH OF THE DISCHARGE POINT OF LST #448 WHEN WE SAW JAPANESE DIVE BOMBERS ATTACK THAT SHIP. THE SHIP WAS ON FIRE AND ORDINANCE WAS EXPLODING AS I ARRIVED. SHIPS PERSONNEL RIGGED A FIRE HOSE TO TRY TO ATTACK THE FLAMES. SEVERAL OF MY MARINES WERE MANNING THE HOSE. I SET UP AN EMERGENCY TREATMENT CENTER FOR THE WOUNDED (THIS SHIP HAD BROUGHT IN A LARGE COMPLEMENT OF MARINES FROM THE PARACHUTE REGIMENT, AND SEVERAL OF THEM WERE KILLED OR WOUNDED.) SOME TRUCKS HAD BEEN OFF LOADED BEFORE THE BOMB ATTACK AND THEY WERE BEING USED TO EVACUATE THE WOUNDED. IN THE MELEE A JEEP ARRIVED WITH A MARINE LT. COL. WHO ASKED WHO WAS IN CHARGE. "I GUESS IT'S ME, SIR", I SAID. THE COLONEL SAID: GET THESE TRUCKS OUT OF HERE, GET THESE MEN OUT HERE. THE JAPS WILL BE BACK, THE JAPS WILL BE BACK. HIS DRIVER GUNNED THE JEEP AND THAT'S THE LAST I SAW OF PARATROOP LT. COLONEL VICTOR H. KRULAK THAT DAY. (WHEN I RETIRED IN 1964 MY COMMANDER WAS THE SAME, BUT, LIEUTENANT GENERAL, KRULAK).

KRULAK WAS RIGHT, THE JAPS CAME BACK AND BOMBED THE LST AGAIN. MY SMALL FIRE BRIGADE WAS BLOWN BACK FROM THE RAMPS, AND TWO OF THEM WERE SUPERFICIALLY WOUNDED. THAT PRETTY MUCH ENDED OUR ATTEMPT TO SALVAGE THE BURNING SHIP.

MY CORPSMAN REPORTED THAT ONE OF THE WOUNDED PARATROOPERS WAS TOO BADLY WOUNDED TO MAKE IT BY TRUCK TO THE FIELD HOSPITAL SOME MILES AWAY WITH THE 8TH NEW ZEALAND BRIGADE. COULD THE CAPTAIN FIND A SMALL BOAT FOR THE TASK? AFTER TRYING FUTILELY TO USE SIGNAL FLAGS, I SWAM OUT TO AN LST THAT WAS HANGING SOME DISTANCE TO THE REAR OF THE #448, AND WENT UP THE GANGWAY WEARING ONLY MY SHORTS. WHEN I ANNOUNCED TO THE DUTY OFFICER THAT I WAS CAPTAIN HOLMES AND I NEEDED A SMALL BOAT TO EVACUATE WOUNDED, HE ACTED IMMEDIATELY AND THE WOUNDED MARINES WERE SUCCESSFULLY EVACUATED. THE TITLE CAPTAIN IMPRESSES THE HELL OUT OF NAVY PERSONNEL!

LATER THAT DAY I VISITED A SITE WHERE ANOTHER LST HAD BEEN ATTACKED BUT DAMAGED ONLY SUPERFICIALLY AND THE EQUIPMENT HAD BEEN SUCCESSFULLY UNLOADED. THE SEABEE LIEUTENANT IN CHARGE CAME TO ME AND ASKED FOR ADVICE ON WHAT TO DO BECAUSE OF THE AERIAL ATTACKS. I TOLD HIM THAT IT WERE UP TO ME I WOULD USE THE HEAVY EQUIPMENT THAT HAD BEEN UNLOADED AND START DIGGING, GET YOUR MEN SOME SHELTER. (I BELIEVE THIS CONTINGENT WAS PART OF THE UNIT THAT YOUR FATHER BELONGED TO.

AT NO TIME DURING MY STAY ON VELLA LAVELLA DID WE HAVE COMMAND OF THE SKIES. THE JAPANESE HAD AN AIRFIELD ON KOLOMBANGARA, A VOLCANIC ISLAND JUST TO OUR NORTH. WE WERE ATTACKED EACH TIME A CONVOY CAME UP WITH SUPPLIES. NOT TO MENTION NIGHT ATTACKS. IT IS MY BELIEF THAT THE VELLA LAVELLA OPERATION WAS A FAILURE AND THAT WE NEVER SUCCESSFULLY ESTABLISHED A FORWARD SUPPLY DEPOT. THE LST’S WE LATER OFF LOADED ON BOUGAINVILLE HAD BEEN DISPATCHED FROM SOME REAR ECHELON LOACATION SUCH AS NEW CALEDONIA.

HARKING BACK TO OCTOBER 1ST, HERE IS A LITTLE CODA TO THE LST #448 EPISODE. AFTER THE AFFAIR WAS OVER COLONEL CHURCHILL ASKED ME TO IDENTIFY THE MEN WHO WERE INVOLVED IN TRYING TO SALVAGE THAT UNLUCKY VESSEL AND TO WRITE A CITATION FOR THEM SO THAT THEY COULD BE RECOGNIZED. I GAVE HIM THE NAMES OF TWO OFFICERS, MY FIRST SERGEANT AND THREE OTHERS WHO WERE INVOLVED IN THE FIRE FIGHTING DETAIL. WITHOUT MY KNOWLEDGE CHURCHILL USED THE CITATION AS THE BASIS FOR RECOMMENDING THEM, AND MYSELF AS WELL, FOR THE BRONZE STAR.

EVENTUALLY THE HIERARCHY ACTED ON THE RECOMMENDATION AND ADVISED US THAT THE BRONZE STAR WAS INAPPROPRIATE BECAUSE THE DEPOT COMPANY WAS A SUPPLY SERVICE OUTFIT AND COULD NOT BE GIVEN AN AWARD FOR COMBAT BRAVERY. THEREFORE WE WERE ALL AWARDED THE NAVY AND MARINE CORPS MEDAL WHICH WAS APPROPRIATE FOR NON-COMBAT MERITORIOUS ACTION. YEARS LATER SOME SENIOR OFFICER WHO HELD THE NAVY AND MARINE CORPS MEDAL PETITIONED TO HAVE IT RECLASSIFIED AS A BRONZE STAR SINCE THE ACTION IN WHICH HE WAS INVOLVED WAS COMBAT RELATED. “NO”, HE WAS TOLD “THERE ARE SEVEN OTHER SIMILAR MEDALS THAT WERE AWARDED FOR COMBAT PERFORMANCE AND THAT, IF YOUR MEDAL IS REGRADED, WE WOULD HAVE TO REGRADE THEM ALL”. REGRADE THEM ALL! SAID THE SENOIR OFFICER. SO THEY DID. HOWEVER THEY COULD NOT MAKE THEM INTO BRONZE STARS SINCE THE NAVY/MARINE CORPS MEDAL WAS SENIOR TO THE BRONZE STAR AND, CONSEQUENTLY, REGRADED ALL SUCH MEDALS TO SILVER STAR. THAT’S HOW I NOW HAVE THE SILVER STAR.

I HOPE THIS RESPONSE HELPS YOU KNOW A LITTLE MORE ABOUT YOUR FATHER AND HIS DAYS.

SEMPER FI!

PHOTO OF MARINES AT VELLA LAVELLA
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Joined: September 1st, 2018, 12:25 pm

September 7th, 2018, 12:01 am #5

LST 448 - Action Report at Vella Lavella.
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Joined: September 1st, 2018, 12:25 pm

September 7th, 2018, 6:30 pm #6

Memories of a 6th Special "CB" veteran..Vella Lavella, Bougainville.
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Joined: September 1st, 2018, 12:25 pm

September 9th, 2018, 8:37 pm #7

Vella Lavella photos from cruisebook..
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Joined: September 1st, 2018, 12:25 pm

September 9th, 2018, 8:56 pm #8

LST Unloads at Vella Lavella.
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Joined: September 1st, 2018, 12:25 pm

September 10th, 2018, 12:58 pm #9

FIND A GRAVE - LST 448 VETERAN


Herbert Theodore Dowden
BIRTH 27 Oct 1920
Lakeview, Logan County, Ohio, USA
DEATH 1 Oct 1943 (aged 22)
Solomon Islands

Herb served as a Fire Controlman First Class on the U.S.S. LST 448, U.S. Navy and was killed in action at Niarovai Bay, Vella Lavella Island, in the Solomon Islands. He enlisted from Ohio on February 4, 1942 with service number 6142308.

Mr. T. V. Dowden of Mt. Liberty has received the following letter of sympathy from Lt. (jg) Harold F. Breimyer, USNR, an officer on the ship in which Herbert Dowden lost his life during an engagement in the Southwest Pacific area last October:
"Mr. T. V. Dowden
Mt. Liberty, Ohio.
Dear Mr. Dowden:
In some respects I should not write you a letter reminding you of the death of your son, but because I doubt that you have gone far toward forgetting, I am doing so in order to give you a little recent information.
I was an officer on your son's ship, having been with him since the day the crew was formed in the Solomons, Maryland. Although there is no bond like that of ones family, an officer in the Navy develops a strong personal feeling when he has worked with a man for a long time, watching him develop from a "boot" to a man capable of carrying out his duties on board a ship on his own responsibility. As your son's officer I too mourn his death.
Because of the length of time that has elapsed, I can now give you a little more information than could Captain Roeschke. Our ship was hit by aerial bombs while we were beached, unloading cargo. It was at a forward area, and we were at our battle stations. Your son was on a gun on main deck. The hit was nearly directly on the gun, the entire crew of which was wiped out. I think that death came quickly, probably without any realization of the hit.
Through the enterprise of a New Zealand Army Unit, a monument to the men lost on our ship has been erected at the site of the beaching. I saw it some time ago, finding it to be an appropriate type stone, about four feet high and pyramidal in form. I received permission to attach a plaque commemorating and naming the men of the ship's crew who died. The plaque has now been completed and forwarded. It was my thought that you would appreciate knowing of the memorial. I cannot tell you yet the name of the island where our ship was lost. I am saving all addresses, planning a further letter of information after the war. Should you (undecipherable) address .. Portland, Indiana. Meanwhile if I can answer any questions I will be glad to receive them.
I possibly should add that I have not had a chance to visit the burial ground. Interment was made by a unit of U. S. Marines, and as yet I have no information other than that the bodies recovered were buried in a U. S. Navy Cemetery on the island. At present I can't give much confidence on this point.
I can do little more than offer you my sincere sympathy. Those of us who were also in the engagement often wonder why it was we who were saved, unhurt in my case, while others were killed. It is beyond my power to give an answer.
Captain Roeschke and nearly all the enlisted men have now returned to the United States for leave and new assignments, with the rest of the men due to return soon. The officers will stay out here for a while longer.

Yours very sincerely,
HAROLD F. BREIMYER
LT. (jg) USNR"
____________________
Condensed from the Wartime Interlude chapter in the book Over-Fulfilled Expectations: A Life and an Era in Rural America (Agricultural History & Rural Studies) by Harold F. Breimyer
According to historical data, we believe,
Herbert left Portland, Oregon on New Year's Eve 1942 on newly built U.S.S. LST 448* (Landing Ship-Tank) a 330 foot, 50 foot beam ship with seven officers and 108 crewmen. At a max speed of 10 knots it stopped at San Diego, San Francisco and Pearl Harbor then to Noumea, New Caledonia. Next to the Solomon Islands where all went well for several months until it moved forward to Niarovai Bay, Vella Lavella Island and began to disgorge provisions on the beach for the troops. At precisely twelve noon several Japanese Zero bombers attacked killing more than 50 including Herbert and 18 of his crew mates. Rumor spread, but never verified that the Japanese timed their raid since they knew that the air cover would quit early for lunch, although refueling might have caused the gap in protection. Then another version timed the attack at 9:30 a.m. out of the sun.

The following description of the aftermath of the raid was found in Invasion of Vella Lavella, excerpt provided by Robert D. Soule, Seaman First Class, attached to Advance Naval Base 338: On October 1 , 1943 I was assigned to a working party to unload an LST. While unloading it, we came under a bombing attack from the Japs. A plane coming for our LST was shot down and crashed in the jungle. The LST 448 which was two LSTs from ours, got hit by a bomb from another plane. The next day two other men and myself went back to LST 448 to see if we could salvage anything for our base. Top side there were still men at their guns and dead. We went below and saw that the elevator had fallen down from the explosion and there were dead men lying around it, most of them were burn't.

An account of the incident as depicted in The Gunners: an intimate record of units of the 3rd New Zealand Divisional Artillery in the Pacific from 1940 until 1945 Chapter V — On Vella Lavella
During the last few days of September enemy air activity was increasing and on 1 October the main body of the 209th Battery arrived from Guadalcanal in a large convoy which proved irresistible bait to the Japanese. Despite the curtain of fire put up by the guns on the ships and ashore, the Japs made persitent attacks on the landing craft when a bomb landed directly on another LST, killing Sergeant M. J. Healy, of M troop, his whole detachment and several Americans. Several others were wounded, the gun and much equipment destroyed the ship was set on fire by the explosion. in the resulting confusion Battery Sergeant-Major W. D. Campbell and Gunner W. G. Donnelly—to mention only two—played a gallant part in getting wounded personnel off the ship and salvaging equipment. Later in the day another gun crew had a miraculous escape when a bomb crashed through the deck alongside them and failed to explode. Some 207th Battery guns on the beach had a busy day also and 'B 2' gun claimed a probable kill, although it could not be credited to them for certain as no wreckage could be discovered. The 209th got ashore without further incident and the victims of the raid were buried on the following day. A monument was later erected to their memory by members of the battery and it was unveiled on 28 November at Nairovai by Major G. H. Turner in the presence of Major-General Barrow-Clough, who praised the good work done by both batteries in the Vella Lavella engagement.

Names of U. S. S. LST 448 crew members who lost their lives with Herbert on October 1, 1943 from the September 1943 Muster Roll
Joseph Preston Adams - Virginia
Mark M Burgess - Caddo Parish, Lousiania
MoMM1 George L Cazaubon, Jr - New Orleans
Johnny C Dickens - Burbank, California
Raymond Francis Fallon - New York State
William J Gray - Illinois
James M Hall, Jr
SF3 Harold D Hancock - Virginia
Alfred Willard Larue - West Virginia
Ben P Lawicki - Cleveland, Ohio
John J Martin - Illinois
CCS John P Martin - Oregon
Harold E O'Neil - New York State
Joseph E Shanahan - Pennsylvania
William Wester - New Jersey
Frank E Whiterock - Colorado

The following men were in the crew and died in 1943
Wilton G. Fox wounded on LST-448 and died in New Caledonia - Oneida County, New York
Jack Douglas Malloy - Utah

During World War II, LST-448 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the consolidation of the southern Solomons in June 1943 and the Vella Lavella occupation in October 1943. The tank landing ship was damaged by Japanese dive bombers off Vella Lavella, Solomons, on 1 October, suffering some casualties among her embarked New Zealand troops.(plus 19 American heros) The LST was taken under tow by tug Bobolink but sank while underway on 5 October south of Vella Lavella. She was struck from the Navy list on 26 October 1943.
LST-448 earned two battle stars and the Navy Unit Commendation for World War II service.
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Joined: September 1st, 2018, 12:25 pm

September 11th, 2018, 9:27 pm #10

1. New Zealand Gun crew with 40MM AA at Vella Lavella...The 6th Special unloaded this Bofors Gun.

2. 6th Special Commanding officer in the Middle..Caption reads..The Japs were all around.

3. 6th Special men at Vella Lavella.
New Zealand Army, 40mm AA Gun at Vella LaVella.jpg
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B Company members at Vella LaVella.jpg
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