Ulithi Atoll

Ulithi Atoll

Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

February 11th, 2009, 2:45 am #1

"Somewhere on a Western Atoll where the sun is like a curse,
And each long day is followed by another slightly worse,
Where the coral dust blows thicker than the desert's shifting sands,
And the white men dream of finer, cooler, cleaner, greener lands.

Somewhere in the West Pacific, where a woman's never seen,
Where the sky is never cloudy and the grass is never green,
Where the gooney birds scream nightly, robbing man of blessed sleep,
Where there isn't any whiskey, just two cans of beer a week.

Somewhere in the blue Pacific, where the mail is always late,
Where Christmas cards in April are considered up to date,
Where we always sign the payroll and never draw a cent,
Where we never miss the money, ' cause there's no place to get it spent.

Somewhere in a Western ocean, where the gooneys moan and cry,
And the lumbering Deep-sea turtles come up on the beach to die,
Oh, take me back to___________ the place I love so well,
For this God-forsaken island is awful close to hell......"

(Written in 1944 by unknown author at Ulithi)



Along with many of you, my Dad spent some time at Ulithi Atoll. Ulithi is part of the Caroline Islands, about 350 miles southwest of Guam; made up of about forty islands. Four of those islands - Falalop, Mogmog, Sorlen and Asor were particularly important. The Japanese held this area for a while during the early part of WWII, but the US forces gradually took it in the fall of 1944, providing air strips, an anchorage where repairs and maintenance could be performed, a bit of R&R in the midst of war and an all important LORAN A station that was operated by the Coast Guard. A few of those airstrips were constructed in less than 30 days!

For those service years and for many years long after, the part that Ulithi played was kept secret. Those Sailors and troops who passed through the area knew how important it was but also knew that old adage "Loose lips sink ships". SeaBees constructed or repaired air strips, housing, a hospital, living quarters for those stationed there, supply depots, a theatre, a church, a water distillation plant, a seaplane ramp, mess halls and galleys (one of which was hit by a kamikaze when my Dad was there), and so much more.

During one period, early in 1945, the islands were a cargo transport area, handling over 20,000 tons of cargo each month.




"Ships of the fighting fleet in Ulithi Atoll. This photograph is commonly known as "Murderers' Row" It is possible that this name was an homage to the 1927 New York Yankees and their four famous sluggers, Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Bob Meusel, and Tony Lazzeri, who were also known by that name.

Foreground to background: USS WASP, USS YORKTOWN, USS HORNET, USS HANCOCK, USS TICONDEROGA, USS LEXINGTON. (NWDNS-80-G-294131)"


The most company the Sailors had while at Ulithi or Yap (another nearby island chain) were the Gooney Birds...

that were so thick a Sailor could step on them if he wasn't careful! Shipmates of my Dad told me that once you had heard them screeching and clucking, you'd never forget it. They didn't keep to the beaches.. they'd come right into the area that was set aside as the local bar - even the Officer's Club!

Were any of you through or at Ulithi during the war?




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Joined: December 22nd, 2008, 3:07 pm

February 15th, 2009, 3:45 pm #2

My father, Emmett Kelly Jr was on the LST 783 in Ulithi. 18 DEC 44 - 0800 Arrived at Ulithi Attol this date and anchored in the harbor, a quarter mile off shore of Ule Island and its signal tower. The 54 passengers, the only survivors from the DD Destroyer Mahan, which was sunk 7 DEC at Ormac Bay, left the ship. Lots of ships at this rock. Travelled 925 miles.

24 DEC 44 - Third Fleet entered the harbor today to spend the holiday here at Ulithi Attol and give the Japs a rest.

25 DEC 44 - Christmas Day, still anchored in Ulithi Attol, Caroline Islands. What a Christmas. At 113 degrees, it's hot as hell. Can't go swimming, too many sharks! One Coke is the only refreshment other than ice water. Merry Christmas Hell! 1200 Noon chow was great though. Turkey and dressing, mashed potatoes and turkey gravy, corn and of course fresh baked bread. We also had a great vegetable soup, sliced tomatos, celery, large green olives and Ice tea or Lemonade. Then came a bowl of fresh made Ice Cream. We did eat good on our ship. Chicken every Sunday, Turkey every fourth Sunday and holidays. We ate steaks three times a week, Lamb once a week, ham once a week, Navy beans once a week, Shit on the shingle once a week, (ground beef or shredded ham) cold luncheon meats and cheese every Sunday evening meal. Jelly or Jam? We never had anything other than Plum Jam. We always said that the Admiral must have owned a Plum Orchard. Ha ha! 1400 - Took aboard part of the 51ST SP C.B. (Seabees) for passage to Saipan. (They're to build a fighter strip there) 1800 - Looking over the harbor, the whole 3RD Fleet must be here!

26 DEC 44 - 2200 Watched new movies all day.

27 DEC 44 - 0800 Weigh anchor and leave Ulithi Attol enroute to Saipan together with LST convoy (four ships) and escort.

Another visit to Ulithi was 22 MAR 45 - 0800 Arrive Ulithi Attol - Traveled 360 miles and tied up alongside the AV Jason (Aircraft Carrier Repair Ship) who is tied alongside the CV 15 Randolph. (Aircraft Carrier) Jason's big crane lifts the I-Beams off our ship, swings and sets them on the flight deck of the Randolph. We learn that a couple of Jap planes from Yap Island, crashed during a rainstorm on an atoll while the other crashed into the fantail of the Randolph killing 38 that were having dinner. 2230 General Quarters (GQ) but no planes got through. I was glad. It was raining like Hell. The harbor is full of the 3RD Fleet here.

That's all I have for you Susie! Hope it was of some interest.
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

February 17th, 2009, 1:17 am #3

I'm sure it brought back memories for many who read this page but don't post. I know I enjoyed reading it! My Dad would have been envious of the chow your Dad's T served! The 125 had good cooks, but sometimes they didn't have much in the way of food stores.



Have you ever seen the photo of the 'post office' at Ulithi? It was sent to me by a shipmate of my Dad's. I haven't substantiated it, but feel that it is accurate.



Last edited by SeaBat on February 17th, 2009, 1:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 22nd, 2008, 3:07 pm

February 18th, 2009, 1:11 am #4

No I haven't seen the photograph. Would you send it to me via e-mail? joeykellydotcom@yahoo.com Thanks!
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