To my Vietnam era buddies...

To my Vietnam era buddies...

Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

February 2nd, 2012, 6:20 am #1

The faces from VietNam were not just faces... they are brothers, cousins, friends. Family you may not have met... they served their Country, did their duty. Often when returning home, they did not hear kind words. Remember that they served... and respect that service. They have lived lives, often never sharing their stories. When you see a VietNam Veteran, simply say thank you. It's long overdue. To my VietNam Veteran buddies... this one is for you.

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Joined: September 25th, 2007, 11:40 pm

February 2nd, 2012, 3:22 pm #2

Again Seabat, a thank you from you, truly means a lot. All of us that served during that "WAR", were just doing our job. We were not looking for praise. No one that does serve at any time, does it for the praise. Having said that, it's nice to know that our efforts and sacrifices were appreciated. I too, thank all veterns of all conflicts but especially my fellow VietNam vets.

Bob "Tin Can Sailor" 1964-1968
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Joined: December 20th, 2006, 7:02 pm

February 2nd, 2012, 9:42 pm #3

I had one son in Vietnam, Huey helicopters and one son in Germany during that conflict. You are right they were not treated very nice. I remember this very well. Rocky
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

February 4th, 2012, 2:32 pm #4

Rocky, the son that was in Germany.. was he at Amberg, by any chance? That's where my older brother was assigned for two years. A lot of my school friends were in VietNam...

I remember the day my brother came home from service. My parents and my younger brother and I were standing at the gate (in those days there was not much worry about security and we could go all the way in the terminal). As he came off the plane, there was no applause.. no flag waving... no lights or cameras. Simply his loving family glad to see him home safely. So many of the fellows (and gals) didn't even have that! They were received home with nasty comments, dirty looks and much worse. It hurts my heart...

Rickenbacker Air Base is not far from where I live... Uneducated about aircraft as I am, I know the sound of a Huey....
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Joined: November 24th, 2010, 2:45 pm

February 8th, 2012, 4:33 am #5

The faces from VietNam were not just faces... they are brothers, cousins, friends. Family you may not have met... they served their Country, did their duty. Often when returning home, they did not hear kind words. Remember that they served... and respect that service. They have lived lives, often never sharing their stories. When you see a VietNam Veteran, simply say thank you. It's long overdue. To my VietNam Veteran buddies... this one is for you.

7 FEB 12 / 2214h
Would like to shair this story with you. In 1991 after the Desert Storm mission, my home town of Owensboro,Ky. held a welcome home ceremony for us veterans of that war. The ceremony was held at English park with all the local elected officials and congresional leaders. Befor the ceremoy started, we were seated in front of the grand stand. We noted some Vietnam Veterans in the crowd, we had extra seats and invited them come join us. They did and it was the first time they were welcome home and their was not one dry eye in our ranks. In Owensboro Daviess County each year on 30 March we hold a special Vietnam Veteran Welcome Home ceremony at a local park. We are a band of brothers and never again should we allow our soldiers come home unwelcome or honored. Take care. SARGE
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Joined: September 9th, 2010, 4:32 pm

February 10th, 2012, 3:25 pm #6

The faces from VietNam were not just faces... they are brothers, cousins, friends. Family you may not have met... they served their Country, did their duty. Often when returning home, they did not hear kind words. Remember that they served... and respect that service. They have lived lives, often never sharing their stories. When you see a VietNam Veteran, simply say thank you. It's long overdue. To my VietNam Veteran buddies... this one is for you.

If my memory serves me right, In flying while in the Air Force during the 70's, many times if you flew into a civilian airfield we were asked to not leave the aircraft in uniform as some of the higher ups were afraid it would cause a ruckus if you were seen in town in uniform. That kind of thing should never have been; if you get my drift! We were all proud to serve and that unwritten directive just didn't fly in our eyes. Many times the directive was ignored.
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

February 11th, 2012, 9:22 pm #7

7 FEB 12 / 2214h
Would like to shair this story with you. In 1991 after the Desert Storm mission, my home town of Owensboro,Ky. held a welcome home ceremony for us veterans of that war. The ceremony was held at English park with all the local elected officials and congresional leaders. Befor the ceremoy started, we were seated in front of the grand stand. We noted some Vietnam Veterans in the crowd, we had extra seats and invited them come join us. They did and it was the first time they were welcome home and their was not one dry eye in our ranks. In Owensboro Daviess County each year on 30 March we hold a special Vietnam Veteran Welcome Home ceremony at a local park. We are a band of brothers and never again should we allow our soldiers come home unwelcome or honored. Take care. SARGE
I am so proud of what you and the Veterans organizations are doing for ALL veterans!
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

February 11th, 2012, 9:23 pm #8

If my memory serves me right, In flying while in the Air Force during the 70's, many times if you flew into a civilian airfield we were asked to not leave the aircraft in uniform as some of the higher ups were afraid it would cause a ruckus if you were seen in town in uniform. That kind of thing should never have been; if you get my drift! We were all proud to serve and that unwritten directive just didn't fly in our eyes. Many times the directive was ignored.
You should always be proud of the uniform and act accordingly. I know that my brother did, and still does!
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