This doesn't apply to our galley chefs...

This doesn't apply to our galley chefs...

Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

July 26th, 2012, 3:49 am #1



But probably does apply to my cooking! I had to post it, though... look where these MRE's were made!

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Joined: March 10th, 2007, 3:06 am

July 26th, 2012, 5:05 am #2

Having MRE's on hand for emergencies, I have sampled many varieties. Some are good and some can be classified as follows:
M - Meals
R - Rejected by
E - Ethiopians
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Joined: November 24th, 2010, 2:45 pm

July 28th, 2012, 4:04 pm #3

28 Jul 12/ 1041hrs
LST-325 Shipmates : When I was station in Tuley Greenland 1963 and could not get to the mess hall do to snow storm. We had left over WW II C and K rations to eat in the snow covered barracks, some times for a week or more. After eating them for a few days, you could not take a crap. When the storm was over we all headed to the hospital to get some exlacks. Later when I was in armor they came out with the MRE's, much better then the C or K rations. Aways pointed out to my tank crew that MRE's were made in Evansvile Indiana not far from my home town of Owensboro, Ky. Would like to say I have eaten in many a military mess halls and meals out in the field, but our LST-325 cooks out do them all. Take care. SARGE
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Joined: December 17th, 2005, 10:55 pm

July 29th, 2012, 9:57 pm #4

Dr Seusse served in the Army in WWII and I firmly believe that that is where his inspiration for "Green Eggs and Ham" came from. One would think the Army Food Lab could get the GREEN out of eggs after 70 years.

I to have dined on both the C-rat and the MRE. I found that there were componets of both that were very good and some the dog wouldn't eat. The oldest componets I remember are canned fruit from "44-45" and meat units from "64" and the breads, cake, and deserts from as early as "68".

The web site Seabeecook.com has a nice read on the history of Military Rations and a few "SOS" recipies.

PS Sarge, You should have drank more water. that stuff is loaded with Salt.
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Joined: November 24th, 2010, 2:45 pm

July 29th, 2012, 11:28 pm #5

29 JUL 12 / 1806hrs
TOM : Sound like you been their and done that with WW II C and K rations. I remember the first can I open of green eggs and chop ham, I had to eat them with my eyes closed. Don'y know about you, when I open the can bread cake it was to hard to bite, took it down to the latrine (head) and soked in the sink in hot water. It would puff up and one could eat it. Later as a tank comander, some of my crew members would complain about MRE's, I would tell them about C and K ration and how lucky they were to have MRE's. When we had C and K rations out in the field, we would place the cans next to the jeep engine to warn them up. But if you left them to long they would blow up and make a hell of a mess. On the M-1A2 tank, we would place the MRE's just in side the turbin engine housing away from the engine to warm up. We also had solf drinks stored in the empty gun tubs behind the loader postion. Some years ago a Army friend gave me a box of WW II C rations, they set on a shelf as a reminder of time gone past. SARGE
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Joined: October 10th, 2005, 8:42 pm

August 2nd, 2012, 4:47 am #6

Dr Seusse served in the Army in WWII and I firmly believe that that is where his inspiration for "Green Eggs and Ham" came from. One would think the Army Food Lab could get the GREEN out of eggs after 70 years.

I to have dined on both the C-rat and the MRE. I found that there were componets of both that were very good and some the dog wouldn't eat. The oldest componets I remember are canned fruit from "44-45" and meat units from "64" and the breads, cake, and deserts from as early as "68".

The web site Seabeecook.com has a nice read on the history of Military Rations and a few "SOS" recipies.

PS Sarge, You should have drank more water. that stuff is loaded with Salt.
Crackers, candy and jam. Or crackers, cocoa and jam.
You could use the crackers for skeet targets and they wouldn't break with a direct hit.
The candy left a bad taste and the cocoa would not desolve no matter what you did with it.
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Joined: March 1st, 2011, 6:51 am

August 2nd, 2012, 1:44 pm #7

29 JUL 12 / 1806hrs
TOM : Sound like you been their and done that with WW II C and K rations. I remember the first can I open of green eggs and chop ham, I had to eat them with my eyes closed. Don'y know about you, when I open the can bread cake it was to hard to bite, took it down to the latrine (head) and soked in the sink in hot water. It would puff up and one could eat it. Later as a tank comander, some of my crew members would complain about MRE's, I would tell them about C and K ration and how lucky they were to have MRE's. When we had C and K rations out in the field, we would place the cans next to the jeep engine to warn them up. But if you left them to long they would blow up and make a hell of a mess. On the M-1A2 tank, we would place the MRE's just in side the turbin engine housing away from the engine to warm up. We also had solf drinks stored in the empty gun tubs behind the loader postion. Some years ago a Army friend gave me a box of WW II C rations, they set on a shelf as a reminder of time gone past. SARGE
I was not in armor so I didn't have an engine to heat my food. We would just take a spare Claymore mind and snap off the cover. If you take just a small ball of C4 you could prop up your can of food between two rocks and light the C-4 just like Sterno. Worked great unless, like one boy we had from New York, you get in a hurry and make the ball too big and put too many rocks around the fire to "concentrate" the heat. He survived....but didn't do that again. What a fun time we had.
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