That's the way it was ...

That's the way it was ...

Joined: July 8th, 2003, 4:49 am

June 6th, 2005, 6:34 pm #1

<font face="comic sans ms" color=navy size=4>On this 61st anniversary of the D-Day invasion, I'm reminded of Brolly's excellent series that he authored last year entitled "That's the way it was." (Brolly is also the author of the "Ship's History" page.) It was published on the website in monthly installments beginning with December 1943 and ending in June 1944. It was meant to supplement the ship's history as a snapshot of this particular period of time. Click here to check it out for the first time or to enjoy reading it again. Hint: since it was in monthly installments, they begin at the bottom of the page and work their way up.

The definitive wartime history of LST 325 is to be found in his book "Mosier's Raiders," available in the Ship's Store or via his website by clicking on the title.

Speaking of our talented people, Linda Alvers' "The Return of LST 325" will be rebroadcast on The History Channel Thursday, June 9. Check your local listings for times. This outstanding production is also available in the Ship's Store.
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www.LSTMemorial.org
Last edited by WebSkipper325 on June 6th, 2005, 7:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: July 8th, 2003, 4:49 am

June 6th, 2005, 10:02 pm #2

<font face="comic sans ms" color=navy size=4>I'd forgotten what a terrific collection of historical LST 325 pictures Brolly has on his website. Please honor the copyrights and do not use them without permission!

http://www.screamingeaglesthroughtime.c ... ersraiders/

Note for media representatives: Brolly can provide much higher resolution pictures upon request. Email [url=mailto:WebSkipper@LSTMemorial.org]WebSkipper@LSTMemorial.org[/url] for further information.
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www.LSTMemorial.org
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Joined: August 25th, 2003, 11:23 am

June 7th, 2005, 2:21 pm #3

Today marks the 61st anniversary of the LST-325's first involvement with the landings at Normandy. As part of the Force B, the back-up force for the landings at Omaha, LST-325 was supposed to unload late in the afternoon of June 6. As you all well know, the landings at Omaha were bloody and chaotic and for awhile the landings were suspended until they could move inland and clear room on the beachhead. So, the LST-325 and the convoy they were part of (which also included the LST-393 now in Muskegon, MI) didn't begin unloading until the following morning, June 7.

Now, as I look at the pictures on the Mosier's Raiders web site and the pages Web Skipper posted last year in the This Was Then articles, it gives me goosbumps... Take a look at the picture of the truck unloading onto the LCT through the open bow doors and ramps... I've stood on that exact spot where that picture was taken. Most of you reading this have done the same. You can do the same with so many other pictures as well... the men gathered in church service on the bow of the ship before departing Falmouth, pictures of men gazing ashore to their uncertain future on Omaha Beach, and on and on...

Then I think of the men who died aboard the 325 this day, 61 years ago. As the ship was being unloaded, casualties were being brought out to the ship for transport back to England. Three men didn't survive the day or the trip back. The LST-325 stands today as a memorial to those men as well. Pvt. Raymond Prince, 116th Infantry; Cpl. J. McMurray, 37th Engineers; Pvt. Thomas Legacy, 229th Combat Engineers... you are not forgotten , and we honor you today for your sacrifice and dedication to duty and honor.

I hope that some of the visitors to Boston will see those pictures before visiting the 325 and perhaps have a better understanding and a better feel for what they are seeing. The LST-325 is history. But never forget that there were many many other ships and crews just like her, all part of the greatest invasion fleet the world has or ever will see. Today the 325 stands in as a memorial to all the men who crewed the ships of that fleet. We may never have such an opportunity again to reach out and physically touch a moment in time.

Remember, and honor, those who paid their last full measure on this day.
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Joined: July 8th, 2003, 4:49 am

June 7th, 2005, 2:42 pm #4

<font face="comic sans ms" color=navy size=4>That's a superb post, Brolly. As you say, it would be nice if people saw all this material BEFORE visiting the ship, but even afterwards is better than nothing. It gives a better appreciation for what this memorial is all about.

And it sort of reminds those of us involved of how we got so carried away with the whole volunteering thing ...
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Evacuating the wounded aboard LST-325


<IMG SRC = "http://www.lstmemorial.org/ws325b.gif"> <IMG SRC = "http://www.lstmemorial.org/gator2.gif">

www.LSTMemorial.org
Last edited by WebSkipper325 on June 7th, 2005, 4:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: February 23rd, 2004, 8:24 pm

June 8th, 2005, 1:54 am #5

Today marks the 61st anniversary of the LST-325's first involvement with the landings at Normandy. As part of the Force B, the back-up force for the landings at Omaha, LST-325 was supposed to unload late in the afternoon of June 6. As you all well know, the landings at Omaha were bloody and chaotic and for awhile the landings were suspended until they could move inland and clear room on the beachhead. So, the LST-325 and the convoy they were part of (which also included the LST-393 now in Muskegon, MI) didn't begin unloading until the following morning, June 7.

Now, as I look at the pictures on the Mosier's Raiders web site and the pages Web Skipper posted last year in the This Was Then articles, it gives me goosbumps... Take a look at the picture of the truck unloading onto the LCT through the open bow doors and ramps... I've stood on that exact spot where that picture was taken. Most of you reading this have done the same. You can do the same with so many other pictures as well... the men gathered in church service on the bow of the ship before departing Falmouth, pictures of men gazing ashore to their uncertain future on Omaha Beach, and on and on...

Then I think of the men who died aboard the 325 this day, 61 years ago. As the ship was being unloaded, casualties were being brought out to the ship for transport back to England. Three men didn't survive the day or the trip back. The LST-325 stands today as a memorial to those men as well. Pvt. Raymond Prince, 116th Infantry; Cpl. J. McMurray, 37th Engineers; Pvt. Thomas Legacy, 229th Combat Engineers... you are not forgotten , and we honor you today for your sacrifice and dedication to duty and honor.

I hope that some of the visitors to Boston will see those pictures before visiting the 325 and perhaps have a better understanding and a better feel for what they are seeing. The LST-325 is history. But never forget that there were many many other ships and crews just like her, all part of the greatest invasion fleet the world has or ever will see. Today the 325 stands in as a memorial to all the men who crewed the ships of that fleet. We may never have such an opportunity again to reach out and physically touch a moment in time.

Remember, and honor, those who paid their last full measure on this day.
Brolly read your post earlier today and it is TOPS! Your mention of the 37th Engineers struck a note with me. Several years ago I worked with a retired Gentleman who after some prodding related his story. The 37th and 229 were there to clear the obsticals for the First wave. He jokingly said "you would have thought it was their own private beach by the way they tried to keep them off of it". I could see alittle pain and sadness in his face as he related his recollections of the "Day".

I am trying to look him up now and see if his story is recored if not I will strive to get it.

P.S. Brolly the 37th now hangs out with the 82nd. sorry I just had to... (Grinning like a big ole Cat!)

Flt-tech
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Joined: August 25th, 2003, 11:23 am

June 8th, 2005, 4:24 am #6

That would be great if you could get his story, I know I would like to hear it sometime!

As I understand it, there was a fine officer and gentleman from the 82nd Airborne aboard the 325 for the D-Day ceremony. His name is Wesley Ko, a company commander from the 325th Glider Infantry and one of the subjects of the book The Greatest Generation. I've been helping Wes for a couple of years now on the 325th Association newsletter as an associate editor, and I'm an associate lifetime member of that Association. So as you see, I walk that fine line between the two Airborne divisions, also being a lifetime member of the Michigan Chapter of the 101st Airborne Association.
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