Spam

Spam

Joined: March 10th, 2007, 3:06 am

January 14th, 2008, 10:21 pm #1

Spam? Spam? I get spam every day. What's the big thing about spam? I just delete it when it comes across my computer. Oh, wait - maybe it was the other kind of spam you all were referring to. Guess I should of paid more attention. The above was all humor so please don't reply in a negative way. Thanks.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

January 15th, 2008, 12:27 am #2

You didn't tell us whether you liked the canned variety ... or not...

Spam Sandwiches
Spam and Eggs
Spam Hash

any other 'culinary' suggestions?


(between this and the SOS recipe varieties, we are having fun with the topic - thanks for moving it up the page! And what about NAVY beans????)

Last edited by SeaBat on January 15th, 2008, 12:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 20th, 2006, 1:23 pm

January 15th, 2008, 4:14 am #3

<A name=SOUP></A><A name=SOUP></A><B><A name=SOUP></A><B>
<A name=SOUP></A><B>Hearty Spam & Navy Bean Soup

Code: Select all

2 cups dried Navy beans,	3 cloves garlic, minced
  wash and soak overnight	1/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1 20oz can SPAM, cubed 1/2"	2 tbsp chili powder
1 quart water		3 bay leaves
2 (13-oz) cans tomato juice	1 tsp oregano
1 (14-oz) cans chicken stock	1 tsp cumin
1 medium onion, chopped	1 tsp thyme
\
In 4-quart saucepan add all ingredients; stir to blend. Cook over medium heat until mixture comes to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes. Reduce heat to low; continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until soup is thickened (3 to 4 hours). Remove bay leaves. Yield: 6 servings
<!-- google_ad_section_end --></B></B></B>
Last edited by BobLST905 on January 15th, 2008, 4:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: March 10th, 2007, 3:06 am

January 15th, 2008, 5:12 am #4

You didn't tell us whether you liked the canned variety ... or not...

Spam Sandwiches
Spam and Eggs
Spam Hash

any other 'culinary' suggestions?


(between this and the SOS recipe varieties, we are having fun with the topic - thanks for moving it up the page! And what about NAVY beans????)
Do I like spam? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Depends on my mood at the time. Recently ate some spam fried with hash browns and scrambled eggs. Pretty good! My favorite meal while on active duty with the Navy in the early 60's was chow mein. I remember my Aunt fixing us young boys homemade chow mein and it was great. Carried my taste over to the service and really looked forward to when it was on the menu - about every 2 months. Some of our crew didn't like it so that left more for us who did. There was always at least 2 menu entree choices in an attempt to satisfy individual tastes. I must say that I considered Navy chow to be the best in the world, even the sos. It was like a feast fit for a king every day. And the nutritional variety provided a great delight at meal time. I can't imagine why so many service people complained about the food they were served. Maybe they just experienced bad cooks, or perhaps I served during a time when food was plentiful and well prepared, or maybe just the Navy had the best food. Then again, maybe they complained just because they could! (Know what I mean, Vern?) How about someone responding about their general experiences with military food?
Last edited by Bob-Lenn on January 15th, 2008, 5:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 17th, 2006, 3:42 am

January 15th, 2008, 1:31 pm #5

I think the Marine Corps. had the best chow. All it took was a pellet of Sterno and a can opener.

Larry
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 18th, 2004, 5:09 pm

January 15th, 2008, 1:57 pm #6

Do I like spam? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Depends on my mood at the time. Recently ate some spam fried with hash browns and scrambled eggs. Pretty good! My favorite meal while on active duty with the Navy in the early 60's was chow mein. I remember my Aunt fixing us young boys homemade chow mein and it was great. Carried my taste over to the service and really looked forward to when it was on the menu - about every 2 months. Some of our crew didn't like it so that left more for us who did. There was always at least 2 menu entree choices in an attempt to satisfy individual tastes. I must say that I considered Navy chow to be the best in the world, even the sos. It was like a feast fit for a king every day. And the nutritional variety provided a great delight at meal time. I can't imagine why so many service people complained about the food they were served. Maybe they just experienced bad cooks, or perhaps I served during a time when food was plentiful and well prepared, or maybe just the Navy had the best food. Then again, maybe they complained just because they could! (Know what I mean, Vern?) How about someone responding about their general experiences with military food?
Bob:

I agree that chow on ships is the best. I think it has something to do with being at sea, and something to do with the cooks having a galley to prepare the food that they get to work in every day -- a place especially built and designed for them, unlike the other services where the cooks work in temporary digs like tents, or makeshift areas when out in the field. (Not as much in the Air Force as the Army and Marines)

The only hard and fast memory I have about Air Force chow (early 70s) is I got extremely tired of eating French toast every day in basic training -- still don't eat French toast to this day.

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 21st, 2004, 9:28 pm

January 15th, 2008, 2:03 pm #7

Do I like spam? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Depends on my mood at the time. Recently ate some spam fried with hash browns and scrambled eggs. Pretty good! My favorite meal while on active duty with the Navy in the early 60's was chow mein. I remember my Aunt fixing us young boys homemade chow mein and it was great. Carried my taste over to the service and really looked forward to when it was on the menu - about every 2 months. Some of our crew didn't like it so that left more for us who did. There was always at least 2 menu entree choices in an attempt to satisfy individual tastes. I must say that I considered Navy chow to be the best in the world, even the sos. It was like a feast fit for a king every day. And the nutritional variety provided a great delight at meal time. I can't imagine why so many service people complained about the food they were served. Maybe they just experienced bad cooks, or perhaps I served during a time when food was plentiful and well prepared, or maybe just the Navy had the best food. Then again, maybe they complained just because they could! (Know what I mean, Vern?) How about someone responding about their general experiences with military food?
I was at two shore bases, one a training command in Pensacola, one a radio base in a remote part of the Philippines. This was late 60's. I remember the food being excellent at both.

Hearty breakfast, eggs to order every day, kind of like on the 325 with Bill Rocky at the grill. I even got to like grits, which you generally don't get here in NJ.
We had steaks cooked on a charcoal grill outside the mess hall about every two months. The only thing we didn't get fresh in the PI was milk from the big silver Norris machine. It was powdered milk. Everything else was great.

One Thanksgiving in the PI the local insurgents hijacked the truck bringing the Turkeys so we had Ham, but even it was good.

I always thought it was interesting that the noontime mean was called Dinner, and the evening meal was called Supper.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 18th, 2004, 5:09 pm

January 15th, 2008, 2:33 pm #8

<A name=SOUP></A><A name=SOUP></A><B><A name=SOUP></A><B>
<A name=SOUP></A><B>Hearty Spam & Navy Bean Soup

Code: Select all

2 cups dried Navy beans,	3 cloves garlic, minced
  wash and soak overnight	1/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1 20oz can SPAM, cubed 1/2"	2 tbsp chili powder
1 quart water		3 bay leaves
2 (13-oz) cans tomato juice	1 tsp oregano
1 (14-oz) cans chicken stock	1 tsp cumin
1 medium onion, chopped	1 tsp thyme
\
In 4-quart saucepan add all ingredients; stir to blend. Cook over medium heat until mixture comes to a boil. Boil for 10 minutes. Reduce heat to low; continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until soup is thickened (3 to 4 hours). Remove bay leaves. Yield: 6 servings
<!-- google_ad_section_end --></B></B></B>
There is also a recipe for "Spam and Eggs" in the USS LST Ship Memorial Cookbook for those lucky enough to have purchased one.

A few LST Cookbooks are still available in the Evansville LST Gift Shop, or from the ship's online store. Here is the link:

http://www.lstmemorial.org/store/default.htm

Scroll down and you'll see the cookbooks. Great recipes. The crew was treated to some Evansville Shipyard Chili last week onboard the ship. This recipe is also in the LST Cookbook. It was prepared last week by the world's best chili cook.

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 24th, 2003, 1:23 pm

January 15th, 2008, 7:06 pm #9

I think the Marine Corps. had the best chow. All it took was a pellet of Sterno and a can opener.

Larry
I used a John Wayne to open all my cans.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 15th, 2007, 9:55 pm

January 15th, 2008, 8:01 pm #10

Bob:

I agree that chow on ships is the best. I think it has something to do with being at sea, and something to do with the cooks having a galley to prepare the food that they get to work in every day -- a place especially built and designed for them, unlike the other services where the cooks work in temporary digs like tents, or makeshift areas when out in the field. (Not as much in the Air Force as the Army and Marines)

The only hard and fast memory I have about Air Force chow (early 70s) is I got extremely tired of eating French toast every day in basic training -- still don't eat French toast to this day.
I have eaten in Army, Navy and Air Force mess facilities and have to credit
to the Air Force for the best. Probably the mess hall at Red Cliff Air Force Station in Newfoundland and the mess hall on Dauphin Island were the best.
The reason great meals came out of Red Cliff was because every cook was a professional chef. The reason was they all were activated from the Air National Guard at Syracuse, NY. We had two chefs who were graduates of the Cordon Bleu in France. At Dauphin Island the shrimp/fishing/crab fishermen were alway loading up the mess hall with sea food, plus taught the cooks the tricks of the trade in sea food preparation. For two years, I ran the kitchen at the NCO club and my speciality was a "surf and turf" dinner
of an 8 oz steak and sea food platter ( shrimp, hush puppies, French Fries, battered fish fillet, Oysters, and scallops). It was so well known that some of the wheels from Maxwell would fly in a couple times a month for dinner.
Quote
Like
Share