Rusty Bitts and Pieces

Rusty Bitts and Pieces

Joined: February 4th, 2006, 1:41 pm

February 22nd, 2006, 7:33 pm #1

We thought it would be a nice idea to introduce some of our volunteers on this forum every once in a while and who better to start off with than our Deck Chief, Larry Hahn.



As Deck Chief, Larry is responsible for opening and closing the ship, making sure there are enough tour guides on hand to “man the ship”, and to make sure everything is in proper order and safe for tours.
That may not seem like too much but let me explain a few things.
We are open 6 days a week, 10:00 AM until 5:00 PM, twelve until five on Sundays and closed Mondays for tours but the ship is open for maintenance. That means every day… and Larry has been there every day since the ship tied up on the first of October. He is the first to step on and the last to step off.
If it rains, he’s down there early. If it snows, he’s down there early. If there is heavy dew, he’s down there early to clear it all off. Most of us are early getting down to the ship but when we walk down the ramp, there he is, out on the deck, doing his thing and making sure the LST is shipshape for tours. None of us has ever beaten him down to the ship that I know of. I’d hate to count how many times he’s swabbed the decks above and below, where ever there was a puddle from a leak. Thank God the maintenance crew have most of the holes plugged, eh Larry? We go home on Sunday and come back Tuesday and find the ward room or Captains cabin has been mop and glowed, or equipment has been moved so that the tours go more smoothly. He even has a pot of coffee on for us and he doesn’t even drink the stuff.
He also pitches in and helps with some of the regular maintenance.
Here he is cleaning out the sand used in sandblasting the LCVPs and, I thought I'd put in a photo of all the quality help he gets. Good work there Sam and Bob.



Here is a shot of Larry and Allan working on a hatch. Like peas in a pod aren't they? Larry's on the left. The second shot is of the needle gun in action.




Of course, he was a marine, and he still doesn't know port from starboard and the bow is up front and the stern is that thing on the back end, but he finds his way around and locates most of the interesting stuff. He has also become a research fanatic. If anyone finds something that we can’t figure out, he digs in like a bull dog and he has the info in a few days. (That Marine comment is tongue in cheek so don't all you leathernecks take it seriously.)
Larry is a volunteer. That means no pay. You have to respect his dedication and intense desire to make the LST-325 a source of pride for the city of Evansville and he sets a great example for the rest of us.
Larry has donated, as of Tuesday morning 2/20/06: 909 hours of his time.

Thanks Larry!
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Joined: March 4th, 2005, 10:08 pm

February 22nd, 2006, 8:36 pm #2

found a cool pics of all kinds of mast tops.
at webshots

http://community.webshots.com/myphotos? ... ity=eSubjn

dont know if that link will work but well give it a shot.
BB
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Joined: March 4th, 2005, 10:08 pm

February 22nd, 2006, 8:46 pm #3

so can someone ID. all the diferent kinds of radar?
crows nest? stuff on the masts?
thanks
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

February 22nd, 2006, 9:36 pm #4

We thought it would be a nice idea to introduce some of our volunteers on this forum every once in a while and who better to start off with than our Deck Chief, Larry Hahn.



As Deck Chief, Larry is responsible for opening and closing the ship, making sure there are enough tour guides on hand to “man the ship”, and to make sure everything is in proper order and safe for tours.
That may not seem like too much but let me explain a few things.
We are open 6 days a week, 10:00 AM until 5:00 PM, twelve until five on Sundays and closed Mondays for tours but the ship is open for maintenance. That means every day… and Larry has been there every day since the ship tied up on the first of October. He is the first to step on and the last to step off.
If it rains, he’s down there early. If it snows, he’s down there early. If there is heavy dew, he’s down there early to clear it all off. Most of us are early getting down to the ship but when we walk down the ramp, there he is, out on the deck, doing his thing and making sure the LST is shipshape for tours. None of us has ever beaten him down to the ship that I know of. I’d hate to count how many times he’s swabbed the decks above and below, where ever there was a puddle from a leak. Thank God the maintenance crew have most of the holes plugged, eh Larry? We go home on Sunday and come back Tuesday and find the ward room or Captains cabin has been mop and glowed, or equipment has been moved so that the tours go more smoothly. He even has a pot of coffee on for us and he doesn’t even drink the stuff.
He also pitches in and helps with some of the regular maintenance.
Here he is cleaning out the sand used in sandblasting the LCVPs and, I thought I'd put in a photo of all the quality help he gets. Good work there Sam and Bob.



Here is a shot of Larry and Allan working on a hatch. Like peas in a pod aren't they? Larry's on the left. The second shot is of the needle gun in action.




Of course, he was a marine, and he still doesn't know port from starboard and the bow is up front and the stern is that thing on the back end, but he finds his way around and locates most of the interesting stuff. He has also become a research fanatic. If anyone finds something that we can’t figure out, he digs in like a bull dog and he has the info in a few days. (That Marine comment is tongue in cheek so don't all you leathernecks take it seriously.)
Larry is a volunteer. That means no pay. You have to respect his dedication and intense desire to make the LST-325 a source of pride for the city of Evansville and he sets a great example for the rest of us.
Larry has donated, as of Tuesday morning 2/20/06: 909 hours of his time.

Thanks Larry!
I loved the feature on volunteers, Rusty, and I hope you keep it up... It's nice to have an explanation of what is being done, who is doing it and seeing their photos 'in action'.

For those of us who can't be there, it still lets us feel like we are part of things!

Special thanks to Larry (even if he is a Marine ) and his cohorts Sam and Bob. (When the time comes, remember to feature yourself and the gals in the office/gift shop).
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Joined: December 1st, 2005, 7:01 pm

February 22nd, 2006, 11:02 pm #5

SeaBat - Did you catch my message the other day about the picture of the unidentified LST disgorging a tank on Omaha Beach from the photo pages of Abrose's D Day book? If you have the soft bound book, it's in the second set of photos, third page. See anyone sitting on a small ledge on the opened port bow door?

Jim
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

February 22nd, 2006, 11:29 pm #6

The book was out at the Nursing Home - I'm reading it with my Uncle who is a resident there. I brought the book home this evening and looked up the photograph... I see a man perched up there (what a view he must have had!). Do I know who it is?

It appears he is sitting on the mechanism that opens and closes the door - is that right?
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Joined: December 1st, 2005, 7:01 pm

February 23rd, 2006, 1:15 am #7

SeaBat - No, I'm sure we have no knowledge of who he (or was), I just thought it was a great picture and I don't remember seeing a shelf there on our Tee. Not sure what his function was.

Jim
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Joined: September 14th, 2003, 9:51 pm

February 23rd, 2006, 1:39 am #8

We thought it would be a nice idea to introduce some of our volunteers on this forum every once in a while and who better to start off with than our Deck Chief, Larry Hahn.



As Deck Chief, Larry is responsible for opening and closing the ship, making sure there are enough tour guides on hand to “man the ship”, and to make sure everything is in proper order and safe for tours.
That may not seem like too much but let me explain a few things.
We are open 6 days a week, 10:00 AM until 5:00 PM, twelve until five on Sundays and closed Mondays for tours but the ship is open for maintenance. That means every day… and Larry has been there every day since the ship tied up on the first of October. He is the first to step on and the last to step off.
If it rains, he’s down there early. If it snows, he’s down there early. If there is heavy dew, he’s down there early to clear it all off. Most of us are early getting down to the ship but when we walk down the ramp, there he is, out on the deck, doing his thing and making sure the LST is shipshape for tours. None of us has ever beaten him down to the ship that I know of. I’d hate to count how many times he’s swabbed the decks above and below, where ever there was a puddle from a leak. Thank God the maintenance crew have most of the holes plugged, eh Larry? We go home on Sunday and come back Tuesday and find the ward room or Captains cabin has been mop and glowed, or equipment has been moved so that the tours go more smoothly. He even has a pot of coffee on for us and he doesn’t even drink the stuff.
He also pitches in and helps with some of the regular maintenance.
Here he is cleaning out the sand used in sandblasting the LCVPs and, I thought I'd put in a photo of all the quality help he gets. Good work there Sam and Bob.



Here is a shot of Larry and Allan working on a hatch. Like peas in a pod aren't they? Larry's on the left. The second shot is of the needle gun in action.




Of course, he was a marine, and he still doesn't know port from starboard and the bow is up front and the stern is that thing on the back end, but he finds his way around and locates most of the interesting stuff. He has also become a research fanatic. If anyone finds something that we can’t figure out, he digs in like a bull dog and he has the info in a few days. (That Marine comment is tongue in cheek so don't all you leathernecks take it seriously.)
Larry is a volunteer. That means no pay. You have to respect his dedication and intense desire to make the LST-325 a source of pride for the city of Evansville and he sets a great example for the rest of us.
Larry has donated, as of Tuesday morning 2/20/06: 909 hours of his time.

Thanks Larry!
Good to see all of the new volunteers 'racking up' hours of hard work and dedication. Pretty soon, some of them will be approaching the 20,000 to 30,000 that some of our folks (not me) have in. Keep up the good work - hope to see y'all for a few days in March.
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Joined: January 17th, 2006, 3:42 am

February 23rd, 2006, 2:32 am #9

Based on 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, equals 8,760 hours per year. It would take a little over three and one half years at twenty four hours a day to mount up 30,000 hours.

I won't live long enough to "add up" that many hours.

Surly they would have had to have been in the Navy or Armed forces to accumulate 30,000 hours.

Not doubting your figures, just thinking how long it would take a volunteer to mount up hours like that based on a min. of 40 hours per week.

That would take aprox. 20 years.

Ouch!

Your "Uncle Larry"



(smile and be friendly)
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Joined: December 18th, 2004, 5:09 pm

February 23rd, 2006, 3:08 am #10

Good to see all of the new volunteers 'racking up' hours of hard work and dedication. Pretty soon, some of them will be approaching the 20,000 to 30,000 that some of our folks (not me) have in. Keep up the good work - hope to see y'all for a few days in March.
The ship has been back in the States for 5 years. Since 20,000 hours would take nearly 10 years of fulltime work (40 hours a week) I figured out who Anonymous is referring to:

Jonathan the ghost

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