Outfitting LSTs in New Orleans

Outfitting LSTs in New Orleans

Joined: December 22nd, 2008, 3:07 pm

February 21st, 2009, 3:22 pm #1

I was wondering what the term "outfitting an LST in New Orleans" specifically entailed other than mounting the mast and perhaps adding guns. Also would someone please explain if provisionings were added in NO or in Gulfport? Thank you.
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Joined: November 21st, 2004, 9:28 pm

February 21st, 2009, 6:53 pm #2

Actually the outfitting was at Algiers Naval Base, which is across the river from New Orleans. My information comes from letters and discussions with sailors who were there.
The outfitting involved installing the rest of the guns, installing the mast, sometimes replacing the props (if they were damaged coming down the river), loading all the ammunition, finishing up the loading of stores (food and other supplies), receiving the rest of the crew. Sometimes updates and modifications were made to the ship that came about after it's construction was started.
Hope that helps.
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

February 21st, 2009, 11:57 pm #3

In reading the deck logs of my father's ship, it also included degaussing operations, tests of the various equipment to make sure all were working properly and sometimes practice drills - beaching, man overboard, radio operations, radar (if they had it) and other things. Maybe routine, but when under attack, the procedures had to be more than routine - they had to be second nature to the crew. It could have meant the difference between life and death.

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Joined: December 22nd, 2008, 3:07 pm

February 22nd, 2009, 12:23 am #4

Actually the outfitting was at Algiers Naval Base, which is across the river from New Orleans. My information comes from letters and discussions with sailors who were there.
The outfitting involved installing the rest of the guns, installing the mast, sometimes replacing the props (if they were damaged coming down the river), loading all the ammunition, finishing up the loading of stores (food and other supplies), receiving the rest of the crew. Sometimes updates and modifications were made to the ship that came about after it's construction was started.
Hope that helps.
Yes, it did help. I have found that every tidbit of information is noteworthy. Thanks Ken. You've also help me see the need to be more specific. The 783 arrived at Algiers Naval Base, and tied up to Berth No. 7. Ten days later the 783 left for Panama City, FL for a shakedown cruise in St Andrews Bay. Upon return, the 783 had guns installed, went down river to the ammo dump, took on an LCT, and went further down river to the food dock, then to Gulfport, MS to pick up tank deck cargo, fuel and water. Excepting for LSTs that secured tank deck cargo elsewhere, does that sound like normal sequence of events for provisioning?

Id love to know the details of lashing an LCT to the weather deck, I'd love for someone to describe how long it took, any and all details, what they saw at the ammo dump, the food dock and anything else relating to the provisioning of an LST.

Oh, to have witnessed it all and lived to tell about it. I wish I had asked my dad all the questions I now seek answers to. He told me so much, but theres always so much more to learn, so much more to know. Now I rely on the generosity of your memories and what you can share through your eyes and your experiences. Thank you each and everyone who provide knowledge that we may all learn together. Thank You again for your service to our country.
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Joined: December 22nd, 2008, 3:07 pm

February 22nd, 2009, 12:35 am #5

In reading the deck logs of my father's ship, it also included degaussing operations, tests of the various equipment to make sure all were working properly and sometimes practice drills - beaching, man overboard, radio operations, radar (if they had it) and other things. Maybe routine, but when under attack, the procedures had to be more than routine - they had to be second nature to the crew. It could have meant the difference between life and death.
Your deck log must be awesome. I have the 783 deck logs ordered from the National Archives in MD, but I don't have them yet. They sent me an Action Report for the Leyte engagement, but said they didn't have any others? I bet if I identify the Task Force the 783 was in they'll find it. I always appreciate reading your comments. Thanks!

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Joined: December 17th, 2005, 10:55 pm

February 22nd, 2009, 1:08 am #6

Yes, it did help. I have found that every tidbit of information is noteworthy. Thanks Ken. You've also help me see the need to be more specific. The 783 arrived at Algiers Naval Base, and tied up to Berth No. 7. Ten days later the 783 left for Panama City, FL for a shakedown cruise in St Andrews Bay. Upon return, the 783 had guns installed, went down river to the ammo dump, took on an LCT, and went further down river to the food dock, then to Gulfport, MS to pick up tank deck cargo, fuel and water. Excepting for LSTs that secured tank deck cargo elsewhere, does that sound like normal sequence of events for provisioning?

Id love to know the details of lashing an LCT to the weather deck, I'd love for someone to describe how long it took, any and all details, what they saw at the ammo dump, the food dock and anything else relating to the provisioning of an LST.

Oh, to have witnessed it all and lived to tell about it. I wish I had asked my dad all the questions I now seek answers to. He told me so much, but theres always so much more to learn, so much more to know. Now I rely on the generosity of your memories and what you can share through your eyes and your experiences. Thank you each and everyone who provide knowledge that we may all learn together. Thank You again for your service to our country.
Joey, the Navy dock at Algers is nearly a mile long. You can see it on the overhead images on which ever website you prefer, just look for "Naval Support Activity".

To see how an LCT was placed on a "T" checkout http://www.ww2lct.org and there is a clip of an LCT being launched off a "T".

The Ammo Dump would have been more or less bunkers and revetments and the dock area isolated. The big dump at Port Chicago, Ca can still be made out from overhead photos, thats where 4000 tons on a Liberty Ship blew up in '44 while being loaded

Help here Seabat or anybody, which website has the inital provisioning list For one of the LST's?
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

February 22nd, 2009, 1:49 am #7

Your deck log must be awesome. I have the 783 deck logs ordered from the National Archives in MD, but I don't have them yet. They sent me an Action Report for the Leyte engagement, but said they didn't have any others? I bet if I identify the Task Force the 783 was in they'll find it. I always appreciate reading your comments. Thanks!
Those logs are very precious to me. There's a lot of "Steaming as before"... (don't laugh shipmates.. YOU know what that means!)

There are also a lot of interesting/heart-rending/informational parts.. lots of laughter and lots of tears too.

When you get them, please post some of them, Joey. The fellows on here will love to read them with you and will provide valuable insight as to what the deck logs are saying between the lines. They taught me so much doing just that. They'll also answer questions and share their own memories.

One of my first questions was "What is a Conn"... that is how much I didn't know!!! I've tried to be a good student, but have ended up in the zed shed on occasion.

Have you found the keys to the bow door?
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Joined: November 21st, 2004, 9:28 pm

February 22nd, 2009, 3:59 am #8

Yes, it did help. I have found that every tidbit of information is noteworthy. Thanks Ken. You've also help me see the need to be more specific. The 783 arrived at Algiers Naval Base, and tied up to Berth No. 7. Ten days later the 783 left for Panama City, FL for a shakedown cruise in St Andrews Bay. Upon return, the 783 had guns installed, went down river to the ammo dump, took on an LCT, and went further down river to the food dock, then to Gulfport, MS to pick up tank deck cargo, fuel and water. Excepting for LSTs that secured tank deck cargo elsewhere, does that sound like normal sequence of events for provisioning?

Id love to know the details of lashing an LCT to the weather deck, I'd love for someone to describe how long it took, any and all details, what they saw at the ammo dump, the food dock and anything else relating to the provisioning of an LST.

Oh, to have witnessed it all and lived to tell about it. I wish I had asked my dad all the questions I now seek answers to. He told me so much, but theres always so much more to learn, so much more to know. Now I rely on the generosity of your memories and what you can share through your eyes and your experiences. Thank you each and everyone who provide knowledge that we may all learn together. Thank You again for your service to our country.
St Andrews Bay was where the crews first practiced beaching. When the crew came aboard the LST either at the shipyard or Algiers, the vast majority of them had never been on a ship or out to sea. So it took a lot of "training" to learn how to drive an LST up on the beach and then get it off. It is not a natural act to drive an oceangoing ship onto a beach.

It must have been interesting to be in that area in 1943, 1944, and 1945. Think how many LST's came down from the cornfield shipyards. Many per week probably. They all had to learn how to operate the ships. St Andrews Bay must have been very busy with LSTs constantly beaching and retracting.

Regarding LCTs on the weather deck. One of the deck hands on my Dad's ship told me that when they put the LCT on their deck with a large crane, the LST went down 3 inches deeper in the water.
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Joined: December 22nd, 2008, 3:07 pm

February 22nd, 2009, 4:32 am #9

Those logs are very precious to me. There's a lot of "Steaming as before"... (don't laugh shipmates.. YOU know what that means!)

There are also a lot of interesting/heart-rending/informational parts.. lots of laughter and lots of tears too.

When you get them, please post some of them, Joey. The fellows on here will love to read them with you and will provide valuable insight as to what the deck logs are saying between the lines. They taught me so much doing just that. They'll also answer questions and share their own memories.

One of my first questions was "What is a Conn"... that is how much I didn't know!!! I've tried to be a good student, but have ended up in the zed shed on occasion.

Have you found the keys to the bow door?
Been there done that with asking my share of those questions and will no doubt continue to do so. At least my heart is in the right place so that has to count for something. You mean you couldn't find the bow key, dog-gone it? I wouldn't mind slipping down the bow tub ladder, especially under way, just like they did back in the day. Then I could truly say "been there, done that," just the same as my dad. Maybe one day? I can only dream!
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Joined: December 22nd, 2008, 3:07 pm

February 22nd, 2009, 4:42 am #10

Joey, the Navy dock at Algers is nearly a mile long. You can see it on the overhead images on which ever website you prefer, just look for "Naval Support Activity".

To see how an LCT was placed on a "T" checkout http://www.ww2lct.org and there is a clip of an LCT being launched off a "T".

The Ammo Dump would have been more or less bunkers and revetments and the dock area isolated. The big dump at Port Chicago, Ca can still be made out from overhead photos, thats where 4000 tons on a Liberty Ship blew up in '44 while being loaded

Help here Seabat or anybody, which website has the inital provisioning list For one of the LST's?
Thank you so much. I think I read somewhere that they were partially welded as well as dogged down.
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