Lost a good friend of LST 325

Lost a good friend of LST 325

Joined: September 1st, 2005, 8:06 pm

February 2nd, 2009, 11:35 pm #1

I have learned a little while back that John Neidermeyer Jr. had passed away suddenly at age 80. He was the son of John Sr. who designed the WW II LST. I thought all of you would like to know that.

I first met John Jr. at Muskegon, MI in May 2001. We both talked at the Memorial Day service that the 393 had in the tank deck. He talked first. His talk was really interesting, dealing with how his Dad had designed the LST first on a napkin and later on a drawing board in an up stairs spare bedroom. In my talk I have always eluded to the fact that John Sr. designed the LST in about one hour and I wished that he had spent another 15 minutes on it! I always meant it as a joke. John Jr. took exception to that -- telling me that his Dad had spent several days and a full night working on the plans of the LST. He said he had brought his Dad coffee the night he was working on the LST and he spilled some on the plans. His Dad was not happy with him. We again shared the platform in Sept. 2001 at the National LST convention in Mobile, AL. This time I got to go first and he was second. In my opinion he did not have to have another speaker to make the total program the right length, as in both cases it was thought the two of us together would make one program.

John had a very interesting talk and I learned a lot about how the LST was designed and why. I was hoping to bring John to the banquet at LST WEEK and give him all the time he needed to tell his story. He came aboard in Alexandria, VA in 2005 and toured the ship. His brother also came aboard. I have lost a good friend and so has the LST 325. Capt. 325
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

February 2nd, 2009, 11:52 pm #2

be seeing smooth seas and following winds!!!

I have often wondered if John Niedermair Sr ever envisioned that the ship he planned would be the "Ship that Won the War". His son lived to realize it. Let's hope when they see each other that John Jr. will tell him... and together they can marvel that one still exists and is operational; a memorial to all who constructed and served on them! LSTs didn't just win the war but saved thousands of lives by their efforts.

I never had the opportunity to meet either father or son, and I regret that. My sympathies to you Captain, on the loss of your dear friend... he, and especially his father, as friends to the free world.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 19th, 2004, 5:07 pm

February 3rd, 2009, 6:00 pm #3

I have learned a little while back that John Neidermeyer Jr. had passed away suddenly at age 80. He was the son of John Sr. who designed the WW II LST. I thought all of you would like to know that.

I first met John Jr. at Muskegon, MI in May 2001. We both talked at the Memorial Day service that the 393 had in the tank deck. He talked first. His talk was really interesting, dealing with how his Dad had designed the LST first on a napkin and later on a drawing board in an up stairs spare bedroom. In my talk I have always eluded to the fact that John Sr. designed the LST in about one hour and I wished that he had spent another 15 minutes on it! I always meant it as a joke. John Jr. took exception to that -- telling me that his Dad had spent several days and a full night working on the plans of the LST. He said he had brought his Dad coffee the night he was working on the LST and he spilled some on the plans. His Dad was not happy with him. We again shared the platform in Sept. 2001 at the National LST convention in Mobile, AL. This time I got to go first and he was second. In my opinion he did not have to have another speaker to make the total program the right length, as in both cases it was thought the two of us together would make one program.

John had a very interesting talk and I learned a lot about how the LST was designed and why. I was hoping to bring John to the banquet at LST WEEK and give him all the time he needed to tell his story. He came aboard in Alexandria, VA in 2005 and toured the ship. His brother also came aboard. I have lost a good friend and so has the LST 325. Capt. 325
I was very sorry to hear passing John Neidermeyer I met this gentleman as we came into Mobile Alb. helped him as he stepped of jacobs ladder I met him latter on as I was walking to the bow about mid-ship he came over to me and talked about our return trip then he asked if the name Neidermeyer ment any thing to me I responded that was the gentleman that designed this ship, hesaid that was his dad I stopped in my tracks any shook his hand. I met him several times after that. when I returned home I large manila envolpe in my mail when I opened it it was a letter from John Neidermeyer and copy of the original drawing of the LST This in my scrap book and I treasure it very much he must have sent one to every crew member. JOHN NEIDERMEYER REST IN PEACE.
Dominic R. Perruso




Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 20th, 2006, 7:02 pm

February 3rd, 2009, 6:52 pm #4

I have learned a little while back that John Neidermeyer Jr. had passed away suddenly at age 80. He was the son of John Sr. who designed the WW II LST. I thought all of you would like to know that.

I first met John Jr. at Muskegon, MI in May 2001. We both talked at the Memorial Day service that the 393 had in the tank deck. He talked first. His talk was really interesting, dealing with how his Dad had designed the LST first on a napkin and later on a drawing board in an up stairs spare bedroom. In my talk I have always eluded to the fact that John Sr. designed the LST in about one hour and I wished that he had spent another 15 minutes on it! I always meant it as a joke. John Jr. took exception to that -- telling me that his Dad had spent several days and a full night working on the plans of the LST. He said he had brought his Dad coffee the night he was working on the LST and he spilled some on the plans. His Dad was not happy with him. We again shared the platform in Sept. 2001 at the National LST convention in Mobile, AL. This time I got to go first and he was second. In my opinion he did not have to have another speaker to make the total program the right length, as in both cases it was thought the two of us together would make one program.

John had a very interesting talk and I learned a lot about how the LST was designed and why. I was hoping to bring John to the banquet at LST WEEK and give him all the time he needed to tell his story. He came aboard in Alexandria, VA in 2005 and toured the ship. His brother also came aboard. I have lost a good friend and so has the LST 325. Capt. 325
Dom; I also recieved a copy of the original sketch on a napkin from John. I also talked to him when we brought the old girl into Mobile. I think he tried to meet and talk to all of the crew. Rocky
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 10th, 2005, 8:42 pm

February 4th, 2009, 2:54 pm #5

I have learned a little while back that John Neidermeyer Jr. had passed away suddenly at age 80. He was the son of John Sr. who designed the WW II LST. I thought all of you would like to know that.

I first met John Jr. at Muskegon, MI in May 2001. We both talked at the Memorial Day service that the 393 had in the tank deck. He talked first. His talk was really interesting, dealing with how his Dad had designed the LST first on a napkin and later on a drawing board in an up stairs spare bedroom. In my talk I have always eluded to the fact that John Sr. designed the LST in about one hour and I wished that he had spent another 15 minutes on it! I always meant it as a joke. John Jr. took exception to that -- telling me that his Dad had spent several days and a full night working on the plans of the LST. He said he had brought his Dad coffee the night he was working on the LST and he spilled some on the plans. His Dad was not happy with him. We again shared the platform in Sept. 2001 at the National LST convention in Mobile, AL. This time I got to go first and he was second. In my opinion he did not have to have another speaker to make the total program the right length, as in both cases it was thought the two of us together would make one program.

John had a very interesting talk and I learned a lot about how the LST was designed and why. I was hoping to bring John to the banquet at LST WEEK and give him all the time he needed to tell his story. He came aboard in Alexandria, VA in 2005 and toured the ship. His brother also came aboard. I have lost a good friend and so has the LST 325. Capt. 325
This is why it is so important to encourage our senior veterans to talk about their experiences.
There are many facinating stories yet untold. If only we could document them all for future generations.
Unfortunately for many youths today WWII and other wars are just a few paragraphs in a history book and they never fully understand the sacrafices past generations have made for them.

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 19th, 2004, 5:07 pm

February 4th, 2009, 3:44 pm #6

Bob you are correct about our schools lacking history WW-2 I recieved letters on Veterans day from Wind Gap Middle school which my grand son is a student my daughter called and asked if ut would be okay to give them my name ,this was okay with me.Now I received these letters which I must say were great nowI wanted to thank them for honoring and remembering veterans.but for me to write a response was difficult If I had Sea Bat here to compose it for me it would be great so I did the next best thing I contacted the school and made a date to address the class. I gave the teacher my card with the LST -325 picture and she asked what that was all about I proceeded to tell her about our return trip with the old Gal she is the history teacher and history buff at that the class came into yhe room she introduced me an I thanked them for the letters she had asked me what I was going to talk about I told her it would be obout armistice and veterns day I concluded by thanking them again then the taecher asked me to tell the class about LST-325 I said teacher I did not come prepared to talk about the old Gal meaning I did not have my tapes or photo"s scrap book( I am always ready to talk bout the old Gal my wife said I do not know when to stop. ) while telling our story I noticed very intresting students then the teacher asked if there were any questions and did I ever get questions i told teacher this is great but she would need to stand close to me as my hearing is very poor and this all went well one male student started on LCVP'S and when and where they were manufactored all in all it was was a great day with these young students. I noticed young male come into the room and he did come over and introduce himself to me he was the principal he said he was very impressed with story of th LST-325 he said I was the first WW-2 veteran to come to thier school. Rt the conlusion I again thanked them and the teacher said Tyler would you walk your granfather out to his car as we proceed down the hall he said pop-pop that was great I did not know about all of that I told Son we will sit down and I will fill you in on a lot more . I feel it is is great to get with our younger people they arefuture genaration.
Dominick.R. Perruso ( Gold Crew)
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 16th, 2007, 3:23 am

February 4th, 2009, 3:45 pm #7

This is why it is so important to encourage our senior veterans to talk about their experiences.
There are many facinating stories yet untold. If only we could document them all for future generations.
Unfortunately for many youths today WWII and other wars are just a few paragraphs in a history book and they never fully understand the sacrafices past generations have made for them.
I couldn't have said it better. Thank you for saying it so gracefully. Whenever I have the chance to talk to an older person (veteran or not), I just get so excited. They have so much to tell if we will just take the time to listen.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 6th, 2005, 3:57 pm

February 4th, 2009, 5:35 pm #8

Bob you are correct about our schools lacking history WW-2 I recieved letters on Veterans day from Wind Gap Middle school which my grand son is a student my daughter called and asked if ut would be okay to give them my name ,this was okay with me.Now I received these letters which I must say were great nowI wanted to thank them for honoring and remembering veterans.but for me to write a response was difficult If I had Sea Bat here to compose it for me it would be great so I did the next best thing I contacted the school and made a date to address the class. I gave the teacher my card with the LST -325 picture and she asked what that was all about I proceeded to tell her about our return trip with the old Gal she is the history teacher and history buff at that the class came into yhe room she introduced me an I thanked them for the letters she had asked me what I was going to talk about I told her it would be obout armistice and veterns day I concluded by thanking them again then the taecher asked me to tell the class about LST-325 I said teacher I did not come prepared to talk about the old Gal meaning I did not have my tapes or photo"s scrap book( I am always ready to talk bout the old Gal my wife said I do not know when to stop. ) while telling our story I noticed very intresting students then the teacher asked if there were any questions and did I ever get questions i told teacher this is great but she would need to stand close to me as my hearing is very poor and this all went well one male student started on LCVP'S and when and where they were manufactored all in all it was was a great day with these young students. I noticed young male come into the room and he did come over and introduce himself to me he was the principal he said he was very impressed with story of th LST-325 he said I was the first WW-2 veteran to come to thier school. Rt the conlusion I again thanked them and the teacher said Tyler would you walk your granfather out to his car as we proceed down the hall he said pop-pop that was great I did not know about all of that I told Son we will sit down and I will fill you in on a lot more . I feel it is is great to get with our younger people they arefuture genaration.
Dominick.R. Perruso ( Gold Crew)
Well said. I wish more WWII vets would pass on their experenses of what the war was like. Alot of them, including my father, would not relate their time in what ever service they were in during WWII.
I do understand that there were alot of bad things that happened during this time taht they would probably like to forget.
I am presently watching the "Time Life" presentation of "The World at War", which is composed of 11 dvds of both the war in Europe and in the Pacific.
I am learning alot from these, althrough they don't cover everything, it did take the producers 30 years to compile all the information on the dvds.
I will bring these to LST week this year.
Thanks for all of the input from all of the vets in this chat page.
Quote
Like
Share