I need an English translation (smile)

I need an English translation (smile)

Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

October 29th, 2003, 3:36 am #1

"Started main engines on report of submarine alert and heaved in to the short stay."

This novice asks, "Heaved in to the short stay????"
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 1:23 pm

October 29th, 2003, 10:10 pm #2

“Heaved in to the Short Stay”…. means the ship is at anchor…now…

Under the present danger [but not yet clear] of a submarine or other attack—the OOD or Captain will start the engines and give the order “heave around to a short stay”…the [anchor] chain is heaved in just short of breaking out the anchor for the bottom. Once the slack from the chain is taken in and the ship is directly over the anchor, the bridge is notified “chain is at short stay.” Now they can get underway fast………if necessary and can report, "Heaved in to the short stay."

In Vietnam, LST’s would anchor in the rivers (free fire zones) and from time to time would have to get underway fast or at least make ready…so the old salts used this term…
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

October 30th, 2003, 4:57 pm #3

Thanks for the translation, Bill. AND the explanation. My Navyese is not good....yet. Glad you were willing to 'translate'! Probably you saw alot more of this in Viet Nam on the rivers and very rarely when to sea (depth of the water and distance to land)?
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 1:23 pm

October 30th, 2003, 5:47 pm #4

There is a ratio for the amount of anchor chain to be put out to the depth of the water...if you are anchored in 20 feet of water--the ship should put out 100 to 160 feet of chain [depending on wind, current, and bottom conditions and much more--maybe a Bos'tsun can expand on this], and if you were in deeper water..like 50 feet, your chain will be between 250 to 400 feet...and in an emergency--it could take a lot of time to pull this chain back in and get underway...therefore, the OOD, "heaves in to the short stay."
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

October 31st, 2003, 4:15 am #5

Thanks again, Signal Bridge! Sorry to be dense. Some of this is hard for me to understand...never having sailed....but I keep trying.
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 1:23 pm

October 31st, 2003, 2:16 pm #6

SeaBat you are doing well in your seamanship training. You make many stand on their toes to remember...it is fun to share. We should thank you for your interest. Thank you.
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Joined: September 24th, 2003, 4:45 am

November 1st, 2003, 2:43 am #7

I find that the questions are technical and tradition oriented and answers are very educational or reeducating. It would seem that a formalized training program for young new blue crew members would be appropriate and consistent with the goals of the LST Memorial. However, this searching curiosity makes it interesting for all of us. The operation of the ship requires a wide range of skills, so specific training could be offered to those willing to strike for specific ratings. I remember often hearing and repeating the words, "The right way, the wrong way, and the Navy Way." So even civilian craftsmen needed retraining.
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 1:23 pm

November 1st, 2003, 3:30 am #8

The lack of shipboard CEU’s is a sound diagnosis. Your purported regimen could have significant gains, with a prognosis of improved longevity. If you know of anyone…willing to be a Training Coordinator…someone who can coordinate with the board and locate qualified facilitators, follow and develop training syllables per navy standards and civilian maritime rules and regulations, prepare training materials, maintain training records, and schedule-training events--please contact me.
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Joined: September 14th, 2003, 9:51 pm

November 1st, 2003, 2:46 pm #9

!!! I'd like to be tested for "Needle-Gunner's Mate" 3rd Class !!!
But seriously, I agree it is a necessity to pass along 'The Knowledge' if the 325 is to continue as an operating memorial. Personally, I tried to watch/help when someone was doing work which was mechanical/electrical, etc. But sadly, this is not always possible due to the nature of the many tasks which need to be done when we manage to get time to come to Alabama and work. But, we can sometimes work on gaining knowledge while away from the ship.
Example: Garth Adams has been working aboard the tug boat C.J. Lewis (of Madison Coal & Supply) for almost two months now. He spends as much time as he can on the engines and the (very experienced) engineer on board says Garth is the best he has ever seen. I will put money on Garth having his 'certification' by next summer's cruise.
Before I get too long-winded, let me challenge all of you 'old salts' to pass along your knowledge whenever you interact with us younger folks. Every one of you is a teacher, and several of us are eager to learn.
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Joined: August 26th, 2003, 7:37 am

November 1st, 2003, 3:50 pm #10

I agree that everyone needs to learn or relearn about the ship and Navy tradition. I am retired USAF and my only experience with the blue water was a trip on a troop ship between the states and Newfoundland in 1952 and about 6 days aboard USNS LST-325 between Greenland and St Johns, Newfoundland in the 1953 or 54 as a passenger. I have a web site with 10MB of room available if people can forward material which I would be glad to post. This site could be nothing more than a great place to post all of the terms needed plus specific information about LST's in general. I have the room and the time and you "old salts" have the informtion. lets get together.
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