Haze Gray

Haze Gray

Joined: June 29th, 2009, 3:44 pm

November 3rd, 2009, 3:01 pm #1

Here is a question for all you "ole salts". Why are Naval ships painted haze gray. Why not black or sky blue or any other color?
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Joined: January 17th, 2006, 3:42 am

November 3rd, 2009, 5:12 pm #2

Haze Gray makes ships harder to see clearly. The contrast is reduced with the horizon and the vertical patterns of the ship. Haze gray also helps to identify a ship from a Sub (black) and a hospital ship (white), etc.

LH
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Joined: June 29th, 2009, 3:44 pm

November 3rd, 2009, 10:29 pm #3

Makes perfect sense to me....Didn't some of the German raiders appear white and rigged to look like freighters?
Thanks for the answer. I am retired Air Force and not up on all the information why the other branched operated.
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Joined: January 17th, 2006, 3:42 am

November 4th, 2009, 12:34 am #4

During WW1, the United States, as well as other Navy's, painted all kinds of different lines, some horizontal, some vertical, to make their ships less noticable. In WW2, even the LST 325 had a different paint job used to hopefully camouflage themselves. It is doubtful this idea will be necessary in the future due to communication and radar.

LH
Last edited by HLarry on November 4th, 2009, 12:37 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 10th, 2005, 8:42 pm

November 4th, 2009, 2:25 am #5

Here is a question for all you "ole salts". Why are Naval ships painted haze gray. Why not black or sky blue or any other color?
Well, many years ago in a port far far away a ship was completing its overhaul in drydock.
Since the war had been going on a couple years, supplies were getting hard to come by and the ship had to be put back in service quickly.
As the ship got closer to the day the job was supposed to be done, the yard birds still had not come up with enough paint of any one color to do the job. In this very early Navy there had been no standard color scheme other than the black and white colors of the tall ships like the Constitution.
Since there had not been any of these type ships in this port in many years they had a small supply of black and white paint on hand, but not enough of either one to do the job.
Since the yard had been told that a financial penalty would be assessed against them if the ship was not delivered on time the yard bird supervisor decided at the last minute to round up all the black and white paint in storage. Unfortunately, due to the cans being stored in leaky warehouses, the labels had long sense either came off or were unreadable. They had no idea how much of each color they had. The supervisior finally ordered all the paint to be poured in a large tank and mixed up. The ship was then quickly painted for the upcomming inspection in a few short days.
The night before the ship was to be inspected by the Navy the weather was cold dark and rainy.
As the Admiral arrived at the shipyard to inspect the ship the sun was just coming up. A foggy haze had settled over the shipyard reducing visibility. As the Admiral's car approached the piers he thought he had forgotten which pier he was to report to. He thought that he was either at the wrong pier or the ship had already sailed. The pier it was supposed to be moured to seemed empty. As the car finally arrived at the pier the ship seemed to appear suddenly out of the foggy haze like a ghost ship. The Admiral was amazed that he had almost driven by the ship without seeing it. Before the yard supervisor could explain why the ship was painted such an unusual color, the rest of the inspection party arrived. They remarked that they also had trouble finding the ship in the morning haze.
The Admiral, siezing on the opportunity, announced that he had come up with this new color to make Navy ships harder to see and called it Haze Gray. The yard supervisor was just glad he was not going to be fired. Later the Admiral ordered all Navy surface ships to be painted this gray color that blended in so well with the ocean haze. For lack of a better name to call it, it was just dubbed Haze Gray.
Since the yard birds did not write down how much of each color was used, every time they tried to make a new batch it seemed to come out a different shade of gray. Once you mix the paint, it is too expensive to throw away so they just found something different to paint with it other than the hull. That is why you see so many different shades of gray paint on different parts of the ship.
Since the Admiral had ordered all subsequent ships to be painted the same way and change is slow to come to the fleet, they remain that way today.
Now this is no ....

Last edited by FTG2 on November 4th, 2009, 2:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 17th, 2006, 3:42 am

November 4th, 2009, 2:32 am #6

Basically your answer is the same except yours is in more detail as to how the color was developed.

Since around 1942 "haze gray" was used as explained.

LH
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Joined: September 20th, 2006, 1:23 pm

November 4th, 2009, 4:39 am #7

During WW1, the United States, as well as other Navy's, painted all kinds of different lines, some horizontal, some vertical, to make their ships less noticable. In WW2, even the LST 325 had a different paint job used to hopefully camouflage themselves. It is doubtful this idea will be necessary in the future due to communication and radar.

LH
Below is an example of the camoflage paint job used in an LST. This one is of the LST 905 on the Ohio River in West Virginia.

<img alt="lst905maidenvoyage.jpg" src="http://www.network54.com/Realm/tmp/1257309451.JPG"> 

Bob  73's N3DLF

 
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Joined: June 29th, 2009, 3:44 pm

November 4th, 2009, 4:01 pm #8

Well, many years ago in a port far far away a ship was completing its overhaul in drydock.
Since the war had been going on a couple years, supplies were getting hard to come by and the ship had to be put back in service quickly.
As the ship got closer to the day the job was supposed to be done, the yard birds still had not come up with enough paint of any one color to do the job. In this very early Navy there had been no standard color scheme other than the black and white colors of the tall ships like the Constitution.
Since there had not been any of these type ships in this port in many years they had a small supply of black and white paint on hand, but not enough of either one to do the job.
Since the yard had been told that a financial penalty would be assessed against them if the ship was not delivered on time the yard bird supervisor decided at the last minute to round up all the black and white paint in storage. Unfortunately, due to the cans being stored in leaky warehouses, the labels had long sense either came off or were unreadable. They had no idea how much of each color they had. The supervisior finally ordered all the paint to be poured in a large tank and mixed up. The ship was then quickly painted for the upcomming inspection in a few short days.
The night before the ship was to be inspected by the Navy the weather was cold dark and rainy.
As the Admiral arrived at the shipyard to inspect the ship the sun was just coming up. A foggy haze had settled over the shipyard reducing visibility. As the Admiral's car approached the piers he thought he had forgotten which pier he was to report to. He thought that he was either at the wrong pier or the ship had already sailed. The pier it was supposed to be moured to seemed empty. As the car finally arrived at the pier the ship seemed to appear suddenly out of the foggy haze like a ghost ship. The Admiral was amazed that he had almost driven by the ship without seeing it. Before the yard supervisor could explain why the ship was painted such an unusual color, the rest of the inspection party arrived. They remarked that they also had trouble finding the ship in the morning haze.
The Admiral, siezing on the opportunity, announced that he had come up with this new color to make Navy ships harder to see and called it Haze Gray. The yard supervisor was just glad he was not going to be fired. Later the Admiral ordered all Navy surface ships to be painted this gray color that blended in so well with the ocean haze. For lack of a better name to call it, it was just dubbed Haze Gray.
Since the yard birds did not write down how much of each color was used, every time they tried to make a new batch it seemed to come out a different shade of gray. Once you mix the paint, it is too expensive to throw away so they just found something different to paint with it other than the hull. That is why you see so many different shades of gray paint on different parts of the ship.
Since the Admiral had ordered all subsequent ships to be painted the same way and change is slow to come to the fleet, they remain that way today.
Now this is no ....
The story about "Haze Gray" makes sense. I have noticed the differeces in gray from very light gray to a very dark gray over the years. You would think that with computer controls the paints would be exactly alike all the time it is mixed. I have noticed that even LST-325 "haze Gray" that was painted in Mobile while the ship was in dry dock at Benders is slightly different to the current gray presently being used.
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Joined: October 10th, 2005, 8:42 pm

November 5th, 2009, 2:19 am #9

I made the whole story up.
the tip off was the heading....Now this is no...

remember the difference between a sea story and a fairy tale?


(now I'm gonna get it for sure)

bp
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Joined: December 1st, 2005, 7:01 pm

November 5th, 2009, 4:21 pm #10

For those who are still confused as to the difference between a Fairy Tale and a Sea Story: Go to this web and it tells the differences in a less gentle manner: http://www.pattayamail.com/.

Bob - Had to look it up as I had forgotten the difference!!!
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