Google Earth

Google Earth

Joined: August 15th, 2007, 9:55 pm

January 29th, 2008, 5:42 pm #1

Just was looking ar Google Earth and saw that they had LST-325 still there at Chickasaw. Do not know exactly when it was taken but shows the work that has been done since the ship arrived in Evansville.

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Joined: December 18th, 2004, 5:09 pm

January 29th, 2008, 7:29 pm #2

Bob:

Anyone who knows more about this can certainly correct me, but it is my understanding that these satellite photos used by Google Earth and other, similar Cyperspace sites, are taken by US military satellites, and the military keeps the photos under lock for about five years before it finally releases them to the public.

So it takes a while to get the images updated.

I know if I Google Earth my house the satellite image still shows my old truck in the driveway. I got rid of that truck about three, maybe four years ago.

It's like looking back into time.

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Joined: August 15th, 2007, 9:55 pm

January 29th, 2008, 9:39 pm #3

You are correct that photo is about 3 years old. Show paved driveway and new metal roof. The dive was done while I was in hospital after my stroke three years ago.
Bob
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Joined: September 14th, 2003, 9:51 pm

January 30th, 2008, 5:16 pm #4

Bob:

Anyone who knows more about this can certainly correct me, but it is my understanding that these satellite photos used by Google Earth and other, similar Cyperspace sites, are taken by US military satellites, and the military keeps the photos under lock for about five years before it finally releases them to the public.

So it takes a while to get the images updated.

I know if I Google Earth my house the satellite image still shows my old truck in the driveway. I got rid of that truck about three, maybe four years ago.

It's like looking back into time.
The photo of the 325 at Chickasaw was taken prior to spring 2004 - since it shows the ship with 4 LCVP's on davits (two davits were removed in the shipyard in 2004).

As for the satellite photos themselves, they come from a variety of sources (and notice how different locations vary in their resolution). Almost all of them come from government-owned satellites (and some from military satellites). Military satellites generally have much higher resolution than the images you see on the Internet (and you will never see their highest-resolution stuff). Up to date satellite images are readily available from non-military sources, but they are not necessarily cheap. (The Russians used to be one of the largest customers of satellite imagery produced by the U.S.) Because of their expense, private organizations such as Google would find it an incredibly expensive proposition to update their images more than every 5 years or so. In addition, images from large urban areas (or growth areas) are likely to be updated much more frequently (sort of like the USGS Topographic maps the guvment produces). The more frequently updated images are likely to be those on government sites.

Ray Rappold, BS,MS,ABD (Geography)
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Joined: November 20th, 2004, 5:02 pm

February 3rd, 2008, 2:46 pm #5

Impressive credentials Ray. Geography was not one of my best subjects in school. I was more of a math guy. Took so much math from the teacher I began writing just like him and still have that problem ... write-print writing.

Do they really still call it Geography or is there a "politically correct" name now? Every other subject it seems has changed names.

As you indicated, Google Earth is somewhat delayed except in special places. I checked my residence and the trees were smaller than now, and a newly built house near me was not showing. It still is a sight to see all the land curves and such from all the perspectives.
.
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Joined: September 14th, 2003, 9:51 pm

February 4th, 2008, 1:38 am #6

Geography is still called geography, but as with every other subject it is increasingly divided into specialty areas. Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry is the name for the area dealing with aerial photography and satellite images (one of several areas I studied). Unlike you, I didn't appreciate math in school until I began applying it to the real world (calculating the height of a building using its shadow on an aerial photograph) - then I got more interested in it (but I still hate Algebra). And I really learned about geography when I began to teach it (as most good teachers will tell you is what happens).
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