From "Today in Military History"

From "Today in Military History"

Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

February 9th, 2009, 11:18 pm #1

"1942 - US goes on War Time (Double Daylight Savings)"

I didn't ever know about this before.... was it simply to make the working day longer or to save energy or both?


"1943 - FDR orders minimal 48 hour work week in war industry "

This was to help production, I'm sure.. but there were many industrial jobs that worked longer weeks that this, didn't they? I'm thinking back to some of my aunts who worked war jobs (or part time jobs on weekends and after school) who told of the constantly long work hours.

Those who worked these jobs were vital; the job had to be done and done right.
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Joined: January 26th, 2009, 4:42 am

February 10th, 2009, 3:22 pm #2

You're exactly right -- all war-related jobs were vital. The work did have to be done right and as quickly as possible. Soldiers' lives were depending on it. Women left the homes to work in the factories, and found out just how vital they could be. That's why we're so proud to now be the home port for LST 325. During World War II, Evansville was THE largest inland producer of LST's. The property now belongs to Bristol-Myers, but is still fondly referred to as "the shipyards." Many of us had ancestors who were the very ones who worked the long hours in these shipyards, so LST 325 holds a very special and personal meaning for us. Evansville is also proud to have produced a specific line of P-47 Thunderbolts, called the P-47Ds, at Republic Aviation. More than 6,000 of these aircrafts were produced during the war.
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Joined: December 1st, 2005, 7:01 pm

February 10th, 2009, 7:21 pm #3

"1942 - US goes on War Time (Double Daylight Savings)"

I didn't ever know about this before.... was it simply to make the working day longer or to save energy or both?


"1943 - FDR orders minimal 48 hour work week in war industry "

This was to help production, I'm sure.. but there were many industrial jobs that worked longer weeks that this, didn't they? I'm thinking back to some of my aunts who worked war jobs (or part time jobs on weekends and after school) who told of the constantly long work hours.

Those who worked these jobs were vital; the job had to be done and done right.
Seabat - I noticed that also in 1943, shoes were rationed to three pairs a year! Never knew that, although at 6 years of age - I had more important things to worry about: Marble games, playing hide and seek, building snow forts in Conneticut, etc.....
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Joined: August 15th, 2007, 9:55 pm

February 10th, 2009, 8:53 pm #4

"1942 - US goes on War Time (Double Daylight Savings)"

I didn't ever know about this before.... was it simply to make the working day longer or to save energy or both?


"1943 - FDR orders minimal 48 hour work week in war industry "

This was to help production, I'm sure.. but there were many industrial jobs that worked longer weeks that this, didn't they? I'm thinking back to some of my aunts who worked war jobs (or part time jobs on weekends and after school) who told of the constantly long work hours.

Those who worked these jobs were vital; the job had to be done and done right.
The whole purpose of DDS was to allow for people to have extra 2 hours
of daylight daily. The whole purpose was to give people extra time
each day to work in victory gardens after their normal work day.
I remember people working in their gardens every evening. I was
11 years old when the war started and had to work in the garden
each day after school. It is time for us to finally do away with
Daylighht savings time.
Bob Wilder
AF2HD
AFA4HD/AFED4AL
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Joined: January 17th, 2006, 3:42 am

February 10th, 2009, 9:55 pm #5

Bob, from my viewpoint, I wouldn't want to do away with Daylight savings time.

Daylight savings time allows outside activities to be held, do yard work after work or just go fishing before dark.

I look forward to day light savings time each year.

LH
KC9NOZ
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

February 11th, 2009, 1:22 am #6

Seabat - I noticed that also in 1943, shoes were rationed to three pairs a year! Never knew that, although at 6 years of age - I had more important things to worry about: Marble games, playing hide and seek, building snow forts in Conneticut, etc.....
anything else that was rationed, Jim?

My mother said that often they did without and had very simple meals so that they could save their coupons for special occasions.

Once, growing up, I mentioned to her that she shouldn't go without so that my brothers and I had extra. Her simple reply, from a Mother's heart, was that she was used to it and it was more important to her for us to have what we needed. All those years through the depression and then the war... the school work, working at home and at the telephone company, at the Uncle's farm on her days off... today so many take freedoms for granted. That generation knew how to work. Lots of high school boys worked at Rockwell, Anchor Hocking or Goodyear... all for the war effort.

What were the war industries in your area, Jim?
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

February 11th, 2009, 1:26 am #7

The whole purpose of DDS was to allow for people to have extra 2 hours
of daylight daily. The whole purpose was to give people extra time
each day to work in victory gardens after their normal work day.
I remember people working in their gardens every evening. I was
11 years old when the war started and had to work in the garden
each day after school. It is time for us to finally do away with
Daylighht savings time.
Bob Wilder
AF2HD
AFA4HD/AFED4AL
My mother talked alot of the importance of those Victory Gardens, Bob. Almost their whole back yard was converted to vegetable gardens in the summer. The trellis along the front port that had held climbing roses then held grapes and a new apple tree was planted out back. They had to make the most of everything they had. Mom had five brothers serving and my Dad and two brothers of his also served.
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Joined: September 20th, 2004, 11:26 pm

February 11th, 2009, 1:31 am #8

Bob, from my viewpoint, I wouldn't want to do away with Daylight savings time.

Daylight savings time allows outside activities to be held, do yard work after work or just go fishing before dark.

I look forward to day light savings time each year.

LH
KC9NOZ
You can fool the people, but not the Cows (or other barn critters). They know what time it is, and Mr. Farmer's
schedule has to move an hour later.... Farmers used to complain, but in recent years I guess they just gave up! I'm with Bob, time to quit messing with Mother Nature.

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Joined: January 17th, 2006, 3:42 am

February 11th, 2009, 1:41 am #9

Perry, time is just a state of mind. We have gotten used to regular time during the winter months and Daylight savings time in the warmer months.

Mother nature had no hand in bulding clocks, she only gives us so many daylight hours and so many night time hours. How we, as builder of clocks, use and determine the time is up to us.

This conversation is all in fun and to me, it doesn't really matter one way or the other, regular time or daylight savings time.

LH
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Joined: March 16th, 2006, 2:08 am

February 11th, 2009, 2:12 am #10

Maybe some of the old timers will remember but if I'm not mistaken the times were referred to as, in the Central time zone, Central War Time.

Wouldn't mind having that now. Means I could fish later in the evening. Although I'll probably have plenty of time to fish this summer. Will it ever come???????
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