Flags of Our Fathers in Evansville

Flags of Our Fathers in Evansville

Joined: December 18th, 2004, 5:09 pm

October 23rd, 2006, 7:00 pm #1

On Monday, Oct. 23rd, Charlie Browning, an Evansville businessman, sponsored a special screening of Flags of Our Fathers. Charlie's LST took part in the invasion of Iwo Jima.

Tickets were free for LST 325 crewmembers, veterans, and senior citizens. The turnout was huge. Of the nine theatres at the complex, seven showed Flags at the same time to accommodate all the people.

A big thanks to Charlie. (he even bought everyone a soft drink and bag of popcorn)

A few photos:





Last edited by Son-of-Rosie on October 25th, 2006, 12:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 12:56 pm

October 23rd, 2006, 8:32 pm #2



Bob R.
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Joined: March 19th, 2006, 12:13 am

October 23rd, 2006, 11:48 pm #3

On Monday, Oct. 23rd, Charlie Browning, an Evansville businessman, sponsored a special screening of Flags of Our Fathers. Charlie's LST took part in the invasion of Iwo Jima.

Tickets were free for LST 325 crewmembers, veterans, and senior citizens. The turnout was huge. Of the nine theatres at the complex, seven showed Flags at the same time to accommodate all the people.

A big thanks to Charlie. (he even bought everyone a soft drink and bag of popcorn)

A few photos:





What a wonderful and generous thing for you to do. Wish I could have been there to share in the comraderie.
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

October 28th, 2006, 8:55 pm #4

I am sitting here quietly, reflecting on the movie that I viewed this afternoon.

It was very well done.. wonderful photography, casting and acting, and followed the book fairly well. I was so proud of 'our' fellows who participated in the filming!

That said, I must say that it succeeded in giving me a better understanding of exactly what war is like. I could almost feel that black grit in my face as exploding shells showered it over everything. I better understand why some veterans never speak of what they experienced, why others (including my Dad) still have/had nightmares many years later. I better understand why there is such a bond formed between those who serve. I won't ever fully understand, having never been in that position, but have a better understanding than I did previously.

The scene with Ira Hayes toward the end of the movie... when he's speaking of Mike Strank... poignant and sad.

And James Bradley's words at the end... heroes are those who didn't come home.. but are also the people like his Dad... a hardworking man who raised a family and went on with their lives - but never forgetting those they served with.

Take the time to see the movie... it's time well spent.
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