Does anyone remember the old TTY machines?

Does anyone remember the old TTY machines?

Joined: July 8th, 2003, 4:49 am

July 31st, 2004, 4:57 pm #1

<font face="comic sans ms" color=navy size=4>I'm referring to those old waist-high monsters that spat out TTY's at an agonizingly slow rate, and made a heckuva lot of racket doing it?

I'm trying to remember the baud rate. I'm thinking it was 110, but I'm not sure. Anyone?
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Joined: August 26th, 2003, 7:37 am

August 1st, 2004, 5:22 am #2

Jim: Think you are referring to the old Teletype Corporation Model 15. It used perferated tape and
ran at a baud rate of 66. The machine was upgraded
with a higher baud rate and was used for transmitting
weather at 100 words per minute.
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Joined: August 26th, 2003, 7:37 am

August 1st, 2004, 5:26 am #3

P.S.: in the late 1940's, the US military started to switch to machines built by Kleinschmit (s) which were smaller the TT Corp machines, lighter and took up less space and became the unit of choice aboard bomber aircraft.
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

August 1st, 2004, 2:34 pm #4

<font face="comic sans ms" color=navy size=4>I'm referring to those old waist-high monsters that spat out TTY's at an agonizingly slow rate, and made a heckuva lot of racket doing it?

I'm trying to remember the baud rate. I'm thinking it was 110, but I'm not sure. Anyone?
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I used to use a TWX and Telex at work...the TTY's you're speaking of sound alot like those....
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Joined: July 8th, 2003, 4:49 am

August 1st, 2004, 2:51 pm #5

<font face="comic sans ms" color=navy size=4>I'm thinking of the ones we used when I first started working in commercial aviation in the late 60's. The last I saw them was in 1985, but I wouldn't be surprised if there are a few still around. (Talk about some NICE anchors!) We used them for weather, pilot reports, position reports, general messaging, etc. They used standard 8-1/2" wide rolls of toilet paper, had a plexiglass window so you could read things as they came across and a keyboard layout.

So .... anybody know the baud rate offhand?
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Joined: August 26th, 2003, 7:37 am

August 1st, 2004, 8:32 pm #6

They were Mod 15's with a baud rate of 100.
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Joined: August 1st, 2004, 4:50 pm

August 1st, 2004, 9:15 pm #7

<font face="comic sans ms" color=navy size=4>I'm thinking of the ones we used when I first started working in commercial aviation in the late 60's. The last I saw them was in 1985, but I wouldn't be surprised if there are a few still around. (Talk about some NICE anchors!) We used them for weather, pilot reports, position reports, general messaging, etc. They used standard 8-1/2" wide rolls of toilet paper, had a plexiglass window so you could read things as they came across and a keyboard layout.

So .... anybody know the baud rate offhand?
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The old venerable model 15 ran at a "60 words per minute" rate which
translates to 45 baud. (100 wpm is 75 baud)

I've got two of them in the basement plus a model 19 and a model 28.

The model 28's were used in the late fifties an sixties in the fleet.

But, for sheer entertainment, the model 15's gyrations are hard to beat!!
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Joined: August 26th, 2003, 7:37 am

August 2nd, 2004, 10:45 am #8

Thanks Perry: I remembered that weather machines ran at 100WPM and I knew the 15's were in the 60's WPM. Spent many hours in from of a Mod 15 at JESUP (Memphis) out of the old tape relay switching center at Maxwell. Got a chance to go TAD to Mazwell and operated the center back in the 50's What a sight to see pile upon pile tape on the floor waiting to be forwarded.
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Joined: September 24th, 2003, 4:45 am

August 3rd, 2004, 4:19 am #9

Jim: Think you are referring to the old Teletype Corporation Model 15. It used perferated tape and
ran at a baud rate of 66. The machine was upgraded
with a higher baud rate and was used for transmitting
weather at 100 words per minute.
I had an opportunity to operate such a machine for a short period of time. It was used for sending network broadcast schedules to the Virgin Islands. Typing out the tape took a while as I recall it had a peculiar format and then you would load it and "blast out a message" faster than I could type it at that time.
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

August 3rd, 2004, 1:29 pm #10

Do you remember how hard you had to press on those keys when sending messages? Some days my hands would hurt when I finished the day's train consists. We are really spoiled with our keyboards...

(My messages never went anywhere exotic, Corpsman...usually to Omaha, Lincoln, Great Falls, Billings or Denver....)
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