COMMENTS OF AN OLD SAILOR CONCERNING L.S.T. 325

COMMENTS OF AN OLD SAILOR CONCERNING L.S.T. 325

Joined: October 18th, 2005, 9:36 pm

March 5th, 2009, 1:36 am #1

Posted at the request of Don Chapman......




This situation is not all one sided. However, I think it is sad that it has reached the proportions it has.

I can understand the Captain's frustration in finding his cabin flooded with water, frozen and alllowed to stand unrepaired. His posessions were water soaked and ruined. The water reached 14" and ran down into the engine room. The engine room was cleaned --- the Captain's cabin was not. HE WAS NOT NOTIFIED OF THIS SITUATION.

One person has asked that the Board of Directors be replaced. This is not a viabloe solution. The Board is elected and authorized to run the ship.

The Captin has written and apologized for his outburst -- no one has accepted it. He had given above and beyond to this ship and should be given a lot of lee way. And as far as Captain being a captain, look it up in the Encyclopedia Britannica Dictionary -- anyone in charge of a vessel or group of men is correctly referred to as a captain.

The volunteers have dragged up every small item (against the Gold crew and Captain) they can. How many volunteers have given cash (like the Gold crew and the Captain) to get the ship in shape to sail? How many have spent 4 months in 115 weather working long hours, away from their homes and another 2 months in ancient vessel AT sea missing Thanksgiving and Christmas and also New Years. Maybe they don't realize the impact this has on these old men and their families.

Now, lets get back to basics: do you want the ship to survive? Maybe the volunteers and paid help need to be a little forgiving.

Mr. Whicker is a published author, a recognized educator, and a civic organizer. He helped Evansville get the ship. He did a magnificient job getting everyone to cooperate for the good of Evansville and the ship. Now his efforts need to be directed in a constructive manner to getting the volunteers back to the ship and resolve the issues between the Captain, the Board of Directors and the volunteers. This is for the good of the ship, Evansville and all involved. Lets see if he can do it. I think this would be a very noble undertaking.

THE SHIP WOULD NOT BE HERE IF IT WASN'T FOR CAPTAIN JORNLIN!

The Captain was requested by our state department to defust a situation that was fast becoming an international incident. After he took over, the problem was soon corrected and the crew and Captain continued the work on the ship to prepare it for sea. He solved this problem diplomatically.

Seventy or eighty men had volunteered for this project. All but 28 left the ship due to various reasons; health, family concerns, some were expecting a cruise of liesure and some didn't have the skills or knowledge to be effective. Since all were volunteers, some were of the opinion they didn't have to work or be told what to do.

Maybe this will help you understand where the Captain is coming from. I sincerly hope so, as the future of this ship depends on it.

Remember, everybody working on or for the ship does so at the descretion of the Elected Board of Directors and the Captain. The goal of course is to preserve the ship as original as possible, conduct tours and run the gift shop to generate funds and to honor its history . . . not to alter the design, configuration, operating systems, etc. unless directed by the Board.

With hope for the future,



Donald E. Chapman
Gold Crew
Former member of
the Board of Directors
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Joined: July 6th, 2005, 3:57 pm

March 5th, 2009, 1:12 pm #2

I hope for everyone's sake and for the future of the LST 325 that this situation gradually gets better.

We are all adults and should act as such.

Enough said.
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Joined: December 19th, 2004, 5:07 pm

March 5th, 2009, 3:05 pm #3

Posted at the request of Don Chapman......




This situation is not all one sided. However, I think it is sad that it has reached the proportions it has.

I can understand the Captain's frustration in finding his cabin flooded with water, frozen and alllowed to stand unrepaired. His posessions were water soaked and ruined. The water reached 14" and ran down into the engine room. The engine room was cleaned --- the Captain's cabin was not. HE WAS NOT NOTIFIED OF THIS SITUATION.

One person has asked that the Board of Directors be replaced. This is not a viabloe solution. The Board is elected and authorized to run the ship.

The Captin has written and apologized for his outburst -- no one has accepted it. He had given above and beyond to this ship and should be given a lot of lee way. And as far as Captain being a captain, look it up in the Encyclopedia Britannica Dictionary -- anyone in charge of a vessel or group of men is correctly referred to as a captain.

The volunteers have dragged up every small item (against the Gold crew and Captain) they can. How many volunteers have given cash (like the Gold crew and the Captain) to get the ship in shape to sail? How many have spent 4 months in 115 weather working long hours, away from their homes and another 2 months in ancient vessel AT sea missing Thanksgiving and Christmas and also New Years. Maybe they don't realize the impact this has on these old men and their families.

Now, lets get back to basics: do you want the ship to survive? Maybe the volunteers and paid help need to be a little forgiving.

Mr. Whicker is a published author, a recognized educator, and a civic organizer. He helped Evansville get the ship. He did a magnificient job getting everyone to cooperate for the good of Evansville and the ship. Now his efforts need to be directed in a constructive manner to getting the volunteers back to the ship and resolve the issues between the Captain, the Board of Directors and the volunteers. This is for the good of the ship, Evansville and all involved. Lets see if he can do it. I think this would be a very noble undertaking.

THE SHIP WOULD NOT BE HERE IF IT WASN'T FOR CAPTAIN JORNLIN!

The Captain was requested by our state department to defust a situation that was fast becoming an international incident. After he took over, the problem was soon corrected and the crew and Captain continued the work on the ship to prepare it for sea. He solved this problem diplomatically.

Seventy or eighty men had volunteered for this project. All but 28 left the ship due to various reasons; health, family concerns, some were expecting a cruise of liesure and some didn't have the skills or knowledge to be effective. Since all were volunteers, some were of the opinion they didn't have to work or be told what to do.

Maybe this will help you understand where the Captain is coming from. I sincerly hope so, as the future of this ship depends on it.

Remember, everybody working on or for the ship does so at the descretion of the Elected Board of Directors and the Captain. The goal of course is to preserve the ship as original as possible, conduct tours and run the gift shop to generate funds and to honor its history . . . not to alter the design, configuration, operating systems, etc. unless directed by the Board.

With hope for the future,



Donald E. Chapman
Gold Crew
Former member of
the Board of Directors
Don: Well said I some times feel that we do not exist. Ifor one am well aware of what happened when Capt. phoned prior to him leaving for Athens the next day. I had returned home because nothing was being accomplished in the time that I was there and when capt. phone me and told me there would be changes made and we would be bringing the 325 back to the states called that day and bbked flight back to Souda Bay and was on my way next day this is some thing I felt compeled to do. I have been involved as much as I could I am not that close to Evansville or I would be there working I think I have done what I was able I remember thos early days and giving tours, my feet hurt from all the tours we were giving. i do check our web site and feel there is great deal being done in Evansville and it should continue> I had a phone call from ship few days ago wanting to know about some lines that had frozen and they wnted to cut and thread 3'& 4" lines I told them There was Set of ( Rdgid) dies on board in pipe shop and srry that I was not there to do the job oshow them how to do it .this is some of my equipment I had took aboard in Mobile 2003 I had no idea that there was a problem wth lines freezing and bursting? This should not have happened was some one asleep at the switch? I feel bad when I read about these problems CREW get together put every thing behind you. Yesreday is history, today is realty and tomorrow could be a mystery
God Bless . Dominck R. Perruso
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Joined: August 31st, 2003, 11:35 pm

March 5th, 2009, 4:08 pm #4

for Don Chapman and Dom Perruso's postings. Their expressions show what the core of this project is all about.

No matter what port LST-325 is in, she represents the finest of all honorable dedication and should not EVER have to be the subject of ridicule or slander ~ especially because of personal gripes against the leadership!

I hope we can have more postings from the guys who "brought her back" because their testimony speaks as the true meaning of what it means to have a dedicated crew of shipmates who aren't afraid to work together, despite all odds, towards a honorable goal.
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Joined: January 26th, 2009, 4:42 am

March 5th, 2009, 5:58 pm #5

Posted at the request of Don Chapman......




This situation is not all one sided. However, I think it is sad that it has reached the proportions it has.

I can understand the Captain's frustration in finding his cabin flooded with water, frozen and alllowed to stand unrepaired. His posessions were water soaked and ruined. The water reached 14" and ran down into the engine room. The engine room was cleaned --- the Captain's cabin was not. HE WAS NOT NOTIFIED OF THIS SITUATION.

One person has asked that the Board of Directors be replaced. This is not a viabloe solution. The Board is elected and authorized to run the ship.

The Captin has written and apologized for his outburst -- no one has accepted it. He had given above and beyond to this ship and should be given a lot of lee way. And as far as Captain being a captain, look it up in the Encyclopedia Britannica Dictionary -- anyone in charge of a vessel or group of men is correctly referred to as a captain.

The volunteers have dragged up every small item (against the Gold crew and Captain) they can. How many volunteers have given cash (like the Gold crew and the Captain) to get the ship in shape to sail? How many have spent 4 months in 115 weather working long hours, away from their homes and another 2 months in ancient vessel AT sea missing Thanksgiving and Christmas and also New Years. Maybe they don't realize the impact this has on these old men and their families.

Now, lets get back to basics: do you want the ship to survive? Maybe the volunteers and paid help need to be a little forgiving.

Mr. Whicker is a published author, a recognized educator, and a civic organizer. He helped Evansville get the ship. He did a magnificient job getting everyone to cooperate for the good of Evansville and the ship. Now his efforts need to be directed in a constructive manner to getting the volunteers back to the ship and resolve the issues between the Captain, the Board of Directors and the volunteers. This is for the good of the ship, Evansville and all involved. Lets see if he can do it. I think this would be a very noble undertaking.

THE SHIP WOULD NOT BE HERE IF IT WASN'T FOR CAPTAIN JORNLIN!

The Captain was requested by our state department to defust a situation that was fast becoming an international incident. After he took over, the problem was soon corrected and the crew and Captain continued the work on the ship to prepare it for sea. He solved this problem diplomatically.

Seventy or eighty men had volunteered for this project. All but 28 left the ship due to various reasons; health, family concerns, some were expecting a cruise of liesure and some didn't have the skills or knowledge to be effective. Since all were volunteers, some were of the opinion they didn't have to work or be told what to do.

Maybe this will help you understand where the Captain is coming from. I sincerly hope so, as the future of this ship depends on it.

Remember, everybody working on or for the ship does so at the descretion of the Elected Board of Directors and the Captain. The goal of course is to preserve the ship as original as possible, conduct tours and run the gift shop to generate funds and to honor its history . . . not to alter the design, configuration, operating systems, etc. unless directed by the Board.

With hope for the future,



Donald E. Chapman
Gold Crew
Former member of
the Board of Directors
There has never been any doubt as to the huge debt of gratitude we owe ALL members of the Gold Crew for their sacrifice and investment of money, time and sweat in seeing that the LST 325 was returned home to the United States where she belongs. I'm certain that none of us can begin to fathom the conditions that they had to endure and the true sacrifices they chose to make. There also is no doubt that we owe a huge debt of gratitude to the volunteers from Mobile. They took on a monumental task when Mobile became the ship's first home port. I can only imagine how many thousands of hours were dedicated to continuing her restoration and revitalization. Now it's Evansville's turn and we welcomed LST 325 into our city and into our hearts with open arms. We have worked very hard and have also donated countless thousands of hours to continuing this legacy that the Gold Crew so admirably started.

We have tour guides who are 70+ in age who have gone on every river cruise the ship has taken in the last 3 years. They stood at their posts for hours on end, day-in and day-out, while thousands of guests toured the ship and relived history on her decks. And, yes, at the end of the day their feet hurt and their muscles ached, and they didn't realize just how hard it was going to be to roll in and out of their bunks. But they didn't leave the ship to spend the night in the comforts of their hotel room. When it came time for them to stand watch or work their shift, no matter what time it was or how much sleep they had gotten after already putting in a full day, they were there to do their job. They have also endured harsh weather conditions and were at times stranded because of the whims of Mother Nature and the rise and fall of river levels. But they did it gladly because they knew what they were doing was important and they were part of a brotherhood that has no rival.

Now we keep hearing about how we need to get past this and put it behind us, but can anyone tell me exactly how we're supposed to accomplish that when absolutely nothig has been addressed, let alone resolved? WE have also earned and deserve respect, not the personal bashing that has recently become so popular with some. We have earned the right to be heard and to be taken seriously by our Board of Directors, rather than being treated as necessary, but expendable baggage that should either get with the program or shut up. Though some may choose to turn a blind eye or a deaf ear to the current problems, that doesn't mean they don't exist. They are very real and have the potential to be quite serious for the future of LST 325. I applaud Mayor Weinzapfel for being able to see the situation for what it is and being willing to take a stand. My desire and hope is that the panel he has commissioned will be the necessary link to finding an acceptable resolution for ALL parties involved.
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Joined: December 22nd, 2008, 3:07 pm

March 5th, 2009, 9:27 pm #6

Don: Well said I some times feel that we do not exist. Ifor one am well aware of what happened when Capt. phoned prior to him leaving for Athens the next day. I had returned home because nothing was being accomplished in the time that I was there and when capt. phone me and told me there would be changes made and we would be bringing the 325 back to the states called that day and bbked flight back to Souda Bay and was on my way next day this is some thing I felt compeled to do. I have been involved as much as I could I am not that close to Evansville or I would be there working I think I have done what I was able I remember thos early days and giving tours, my feet hurt from all the tours we were giving. i do check our web site and feel there is great deal being done in Evansville and it should continue> I had a phone call from ship few days ago wanting to know about some lines that had frozen and they wnted to cut and thread 3'& 4" lines I told them There was Set of ( Rdgid) dies on board in pipe shop and srry that I was not there to do the job oshow them how to do it .this is some of my equipment I had took aboard in Mobile 2003 I had no idea that there was a problem wth lines freezing and bursting? This should not have happened was some one asleep at the switch? I feel bad when I read about these problems CREW get together put every thing behind you. Yesreday is history, today is realty and tomorrow could be a mystery
God Bless . Dominck R. Perruso
Does The 325 need a tool and die set of it's own? If so I can bring a set or two during work week and Dominic can have his own set back, and/or The 325 can have extras.
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Joined: December 20th, 2006, 7:02 pm

March 6th, 2009, 4:14 am #7

There has never been any doubt as to the huge debt of gratitude we owe ALL members of the Gold Crew for their sacrifice and investment of money, time and sweat in seeing that the LST 325 was returned home to the United States where she belongs. I'm certain that none of us can begin to fathom the conditions that they had to endure and the true sacrifices they chose to make. There also is no doubt that we owe a huge debt of gratitude to the volunteers from Mobile. They took on a monumental task when Mobile became the ship's first home port. I can only imagine how many thousands of hours were dedicated to continuing her restoration and revitalization. Now it's Evansville's turn and we welcomed LST 325 into our city and into our hearts with open arms. We have worked very hard and have also donated countless thousands of hours to continuing this legacy that the Gold Crew so admirably started.

We have tour guides who are 70+ in age who have gone on every river cruise the ship has taken in the last 3 years. They stood at their posts for hours on end, day-in and day-out, while thousands of guests toured the ship and relived history on her decks. And, yes, at the end of the day their feet hurt and their muscles ached, and they didn't realize just how hard it was going to be to roll in and out of their bunks. But they didn't leave the ship to spend the night in the comforts of their hotel room. When it came time for them to stand watch or work their shift, no matter what time it was or how much sleep they had gotten after already putting in a full day, they were there to do their job. They have also endured harsh weather conditions and were at times stranded because of the whims of Mother Nature and the rise and fall of river levels. But they did it gladly because they knew what they were doing was important and they were part of a brotherhood that has no rival.

Now we keep hearing about how we need to get past this and put it behind us, but can anyone tell me exactly how we're supposed to accomplish that when absolutely nothig has been addressed, let alone resolved? WE have also earned and deserve respect, not the personal bashing that has recently become so popular with some. We have earned the right to be heard and to be taken seriously by our Board of Directors, rather than being treated as necessary, but expendable baggage that should either get with the program or shut up. Though some may choose to turn a blind eye or a deaf ear to the current problems, that doesn't mean they don't exist. They are very real and have the potential to be quite serious for the future of LST 325. I applaud Mayor Weinzapfel for being able to see the situation for what it is and being willing to take a stand. My desire and hope is that the panel he has commissioned will be the necessary link to finding an acceptable resolution for ALL parties involved.
Re: Another Side to the Story
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Joined: December 19th, 2004, 5:07 pm

March 6th, 2009, 1:39 pm #8

Does The 325 need a tool and die set of it's own? If so I can bring a set or two during work week and Dominic can have his own set back, and/or The 325 can have extras.
Joe I amnot in need of the ridgid dies that I put aboard the 325 they are for large pipe and I stopped using them a few years ago if you have a good set of dies ratchet type (ridgid) 1/4"-1" that would be great also pipe cutter there is a ridgid stock in pipe shop 1"-2" I relpaced the dies it should be in good condition also there is a pipe vise that I fitted up to large vise in pipe shop if you have a pipe vise stand that would also be great. Dom.
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Joined: December 19th, 2004, 5:07 pm

March 6th, 2009, 1:46 pm #9

There has never been any doubt as to the huge debt of gratitude we owe ALL members of the Gold Crew for their sacrifice and investment of money, time and sweat in seeing that the LST 325 was returned home to the United States where she belongs. I'm certain that none of us can begin to fathom the conditions that they had to endure and the true sacrifices they chose to make. There also is no doubt that we owe a huge debt of gratitude to the volunteers from Mobile. They took on a monumental task when Mobile became the ship's first home port. I can only imagine how many thousands of hours were dedicated to continuing her restoration and revitalization. Now it's Evansville's turn and we welcomed LST 325 into our city and into our hearts with open arms. We have worked very hard and have also donated countless thousands of hours to continuing this legacy that the Gold Crew so admirably started.

We have tour guides who are 70+ in age who have gone on every river cruise the ship has taken in the last 3 years. They stood at their posts for hours on end, day-in and day-out, while thousands of guests toured the ship and relived history on her decks. And, yes, at the end of the day their feet hurt and their muscles ached, and they didn't realize just how hard it was going to be to roll in and out of their bunks. But they didn't leave the ship to spend the night in the comforts of their hotel room. When it came time for them to stand watch or work their shift, no matter what time it was or how much sleep they had gotten after already putting in a full day, they were there to do their job. They have also endured harsh weather conditions and were at times stranded because of the whims of Mother Nature and the rise and fall of river levels. But they did it gladly because they knew what they were doing was important and they were part of a brotherhood that has no rival.

Now we keep hearing about how we need to get past this and put it behind us, but can anyone tell me exactly how we're supposed to accomplish that when absolutely nothig has been addressed, let alone resolved? WE have also earned and deserve respect, not the personal bashing that has recently become so popular with some. We have earned the right to be heard and to be taken seriously by our Board of Directors, rather than being treated as necessary, but expendable baggage that should either get with the program or shut up. Though some may choose to turn a blind eye or a deaf ear to the current problems, that doesn't mean they don't exist. They are very real and have the potential to be quite serious for the future of LST 325. I applaud Mayor Weinzapfel for being able to see the situation for what it is and being willing to take a stand. My desire and hope is that the panel he has commissioned will be the necessary link to finding an acceptable resolution for ALL parties involved.
I would like to clarify one thing myself and the other tour guides did our tours and also stood our watches. thaat said is enough now lets get on with all the woork ahead
thank you .Dom
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Joined: December 20th, 2006, 7:02 pm

March 7th, 2009, 12:19 am #10

There has never been any doubt as to the huge debt of gratitude we owe ALL members of the Gold Crew for their sacrifice and investment of money, time and sweat in seeing that the LST 325 was returned home to the United States where she belongs. I'm certain that none of us can begin to fathom the conditions that they had to endure and the true sacrifices they chose to make. There also is no doubt that we owe a huge debt of gratitude to the volunteers from Mobile. They took on a monumental task when Mobile became the ship's first home port. I can only imagine how many thousands of hours were dedicated to continuing her restoration and revitalization. Now it's Evansville's turn and we welcomed LST 325 into our city and into our hearts with open arms. We have worked very hard and have also donated countless thousands of hours to continuing this legacy that the Gold Crew so admirably started.

We have tour guides who are 70+ in age who have gone on every river cruise the ship has taken in the last 3 years. They stood at their posts for hours on end, day-in and day-out, while thousands of guests toured the ship and relived history on her decks. And, yes, at the end of the day their feet hurt and their muscles ached, and they didn't realize just how hard it was going to be to roll in and out of their bunks. But they didn't leave the ship to spend the night in the comforts of their hotel room. When it came time for them to stand watch or work their shift, no matter what time it was or how much sleep they had gotten after already putting in a full day, they were there to do their job. They have also endured harsh weather conditions and were at times stranded because of the whims of Mother Nature and the rise and fall of river levels. But they did it gladly because they knew what they were doing was important and they were part of a brotherhood that has no rival.

Now we keep hearing about how we need to get past this and put it behind us, but can anyone tell me exactly how we're supposed to accomplish that when absolutely nothig has been addressed, let alone resolved? WE have also earned and deserve respect, not the personal bashing that has recently become so popular with some. We have earned the right to be heard and to be taken seriously by our Board of Directors, rather than being treated as necessary, but expendable baggage that should either get with the program or shut up. Though some may choose to turn a blind eye or a deaf ear to the current problems, that doesn't mean they don't exist. They are very real and have the potential to be quite serious for the future of LST 325. I applaud Mayor Weinzapfel for being able to see the situation for what it is and being willing to take a stand. My desire and hope is that the panel he has commissioned will be the necessary link to finding an acceptable resolution for ALL parties involved.
I have a great deal of respect for most of the Evansville volunteers, tour guides and maintenance people alike. They have put in many valuable volunteer hours. I know this as I have put in many hours working along side of them.
Now I will get into the response of the Another Side to the Story. I am one of the GOLD CREW and I have tried to keep my thoughts to myself . You dont know how many sleepless hours I have spent over this situation and after reading this last insert in the Discussion and Chat I cant contain myself any longer. To start with Captain Jornlin rather than calling us Gold Crew he wanted to just call every body crew whether they were the men that brought the 325 back or were blue crew from Mobile or the Evansville volunteers. Combine all in one crew. I am sorry but I dont agree with this. I am Gold Crew and proud of it.
You mention tour guides who are 70 plus and how hard it was on them to conduct the tours and how hard it would be to roll in and out of the bunks. I was 75 and some of the others of the 28 were older than that and we were useing the same bunks which in the storms turned us every way but loose plus in these same storms the lockers tore loose from the bulk heads dumping the contents all over the deck. None of you will ever know or begin to understand what we went through bringing the old girl back from Greece.

First of all on the river trips we have had a crew most of the times of 40 men. Quite often many of the crew making only part of the trip. On the trip from Greece we had 28 men that made the whole trip and if we would have had only 27 we would have had to abandon the project. The ship on the trip back had individual vertical ladders with 21 rungs in and out of both engine rooms and the shaft alleys, which had to be traversed many times during the watches plus added break downs. You should try going up and down these ladders while in a very rough storm. Now it is much easier as there is one short ladder from the tank deck at an angle down into the main engine room. Also with the added hatch ways you can get from one engine room to the other or to the shaft alleys, without going up and down all of those ladders.
You mention spending the night in the comfort of their hotel rooms. I was one of those and the reason being that my wife standing on the hard steel deck in the tank deck for up too 10 hours with no air conditioning with a few other ladies selling t-shirts, sweat shirts, caps, and other memorabilia and if we didnt have the duty or have a watch to stand, we were allowed to spend the night at the hotel. Now if you few cry babies had your wives doing what our wives did you could have the same privileges.
You keep complaining about Captain Jornlin. Now let me tell you a few things. During the terrible storms that I mentioned above, the Captain never got any sleep as he was up all night directing the operations. Also almost daily we had breakdowns. Some much more severe than others. quite often when I went on watch in the engine room I would find the Captain down there helping where ever he could, quite often in the middle of the night.
On this last trip I was very ill but I have always stood my watches. I had the 2000 to 2400 security watch which included checking on the gangway watch person. I had just completed my first round and was at the bow checking on the gangway when the Captain came aboard. He asked me what I was doing up since I was ill? I told him I was standing my security watch and no one has ever had to stand my watch before. The Captain insisted that I go hit the sack and he would take my watch. At first I argued with him but he was quite insistent , so I let him have my watch. I heard some of the crew complaining the next day, wondering what the skipper was doing up in the middle of the night.
You know what? I would be very upset, as the skipper was upon finding my cabin flooded and no one told me about it until much later. Who wasnt doing their job? Plus some changes to the ship were in the process of being done without clearance from the Captain or the board. I dont blame the skipper or the board for being upset over some of these things.
As far as volunteering Dianne and I spent up too 6 weeks in Mobile working with the blue crew 7 days a week one winter and I have spent a few work weeks at the ship since.
Back to all of the other trips that have been taken since we brought the ship back. That was the full intent to keep the ship operational so we could take it to the people so they could see what a W.W.2 LST was & looked like. A few of us that brought the ship back have been on every trip. I will be 84 at the end of this month so will give it up. but why dont you FEW on both sides quit stirring the pot and lets get working back together again.
Rocky

William Rocky Hill
Mo. M.M. 2/c
W.W.II LSTs 465 and Memorial 325
U.S. Navy
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