A little more trivia

A little more trivia

Joined: October 10th, 2005, 8:42 pm

March 9th, 2008, 6:03 am #1

On my previous ship we called them LCVPs.
I notice we call them Higgins boats on the LST 325 so I did some research.
Now I know where that name came from.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

The Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel (LCVP) or Higgins boat was a landing craft used extensively in World War II. The craft was designed by Andrew Higgins of Louisiana, United States based on boats made for operating in swamps and marshes. More than 20,000 were built, by Higgins Industries and licensees.


Men disembarking from an LCVP.Constructed from plywood, this shallow-draft, barge-like boat could ferry a platoon-sized complement of 36 men to shore at 9 knots (17 km/h). Men generally entered the boat by climbing down a cargo net hung from the side of their troop transport; they exited by charging down the boat's bow ramp.

More on this link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LCVP

The web page said there is only one origial Higgins boat left in display in France.
I wonder if ours are original WW2 crafts?

bp

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Joined: December 17th, 2005, 10:55 pm

March 9th, 2008, 8:09 am #2

but different materials. the Higgins was wood ,where as the post war period construction replaced them with a Fiberglass hull but retained the features of the Higgins design.

The old timers call them Higgins boats, we learned LCVP but if it looks like a Higgins, Sounds like a Higgings amd works like a Higgings. it must be a Higgins.

If an LCM can be a MIKE boat,
Why can't a LCVP be a Higgins
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Joined: February 27th, 2005, 12:56 pm

March 9th, 2008, 7:04 pm #3

I thought a higgen's boat had a bow on it my grandfather had one that I was told was on the beach first ahead of the lcvp.

Bob R.
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Joined: September 20th, 2006, 1:23 pm

March 9th, 2008, 7:41 pm #4


Bob,

I have added a crew photo of the 905 taken in 1945. If you look at the Higgins boat on the port side, there appears to be a small triangular wedge (this could just be paint) on the bow ramp. Is this the bow that you are refering to?

Also do you think the gun on the forward port side of the superstructure look like a 20 or 40 mm AA gun?

Thanks,

Bob

<IMG alt=LST9051945FullCrew2.jpg src="http://www.network54.com/Realm/tmp/1205 ... JPG">&nbsp;
Last edited by BobLST905 on March 9th, 2008, 7:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2004, 5:09 pm

March 9th, 2008, 9:54 pm #5

On my previous ship we called them LCVPs.
I notice we call them Higgins boats on the LST 325 so I did some research.
Now I know where that name came from.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

The Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel (LCVP) or Higgins boat was a landing craft used extensively in World War II. The craft was designed by Andrew Higgins of Louisiana, United States based on boats made for operating in swamps and marshes. More than 20,000 were built, by Higgins Industries and licensees.


Men disembarking from an LCVP.Constructed from plywood, this shallow-draft, barge-like boat could ferry a platoon-sized complement of 36 men to shore at 9 knots (17 km/h). Men generally entered the boat by climbing down a cargo net hung from the side of their troop transport; they exited by charging down the boat's bow ramp.

More on this link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LCVP

The web page said there is only one origial Higgins boat left in display in France.
I wonder if ours are original WW2 crafts?

bp
The Higgins Boat Co. in New Orleans was famous for making LCVPs during WW2, and the phrase "Higgins boat" has become synonymous with LCVPs regardless if if they were made by the Higgins Boat Co. or not, and also regardless of if they were made after the war when the Higgins Boat Co. was no longer in business.

This is similar to how many of us refer to all cola drinks as "coke" regardless of if it was made by Coca Cola or not.

Here is a photo of one of LST 325's LCVP "Higgins" boats on a test run in the Ohio River after some repairs. The photo was taken from the deck of LST 325.

From left to right: Sam Richey, Jim Grayson, Don Hardesty, Marvin Oeth, and Larry Hahn


Last edited by Son-of-Rosie on March 9th, 2008, 9:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: February 20th, 2008, 1:24 am

March 9th, 2008, 10:03 pm #6

On the LST898 we referred to them as LCVP or" Small Boat" We had two aboard. We originally had a 3 inch gun but was replaced because it shook the ship too much. That is what we were told.
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Joined: November 20th, 2004, 5:02 pm

March 9th, 2008, 10:26 pm #7

THE LIBERTY BOAT!!
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Joined: December 18th, 2004, 5:09 pm

March 9th, 2008, 11:00 pm #8

On the LST898 we referred to them as LCVP or" Small Boat" We had two aboard. We originally had a 3 inch gun but was replaced because it shook the ship too much. That is what we were told.
LST 325 also had a 3" gun at one time, but it was replaced before the Normandy Invasion. The 3" guns were said to be usable against both air and surface targets, but in reality that large gun was basically an artillery weapon and pretty much useless as an anti-aircraft gun according to some gunnery mates I have spoken to (aircraft the main enemy of LSTs).

Last edited by Son-of-Rosie on March 9th, 2008, 11:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 17th, 2006, 3:42 am

March 9th, 2008, 11:41 pm #9

The Higgins Boat Co. in New Orleans was famous for making LCVPs during WW2, and the phrase "Higgins boat" has become synonymous with LCVPs regardless if if they were made by the Higgins Boat Co. or not, and also regardless of if they were made after the war when the Higgins Boat Co. was no longer in business.

This is similar to how many of us refer to all cola drinks as "coke" regardless of if it was made by Coca Cola or not.

Here is a photo of one of LST 325's LCVP "Higgins" boats on a test run in the Ohio River after some repairs. The photo was taken from the deck of LST 325.

From left to right: Sam Richey, Jim Grayson, Don Hardesty, Marvin Oeth, and Larry Hahn


In my studies of the LCVP, I find the fiberglass models were made in England in the early 50's.

I also understand there is a museum in Mobile or New Orleans that has a "wooden" Higgins boat on display. This I have not confirmed but was told this by a couple of tour members.

LH
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

March 10th, 2008, 12:20 am #10

It's probably at the WWII Museum, Larry.. but I'm not sure. Ask Ron Maranto - he will know as he's involved with that venture as well.

In Columbus, Ohio, Mott's Military Museum has a 'wooden' one on display - mahogany I believe - but it's in pretty bad shape and is definitely NOT operable.

From what was explained to me, 'LCVP' 'Higgins Boat' and 'Small Boat' are all pretty much interchangeable names for the same vessel... John, a Coxswain friend of mine on LST 309 (he served at Normandy among other invasions) always refers to them as 'Small Boats'
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