A different type of Navy Trivia...

A different type of Navy Trivia...

Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

March 30th, 2009, 11:17 pm #1

"In 1943, Richard James was a naval engineer trying to develop a meter designed to monitor horsepower on naval battleships. Richard was working with tension springs when one of the springs fell to the ground. He saw how the spring kept moving after it hit the ground and an idea for a toy was born.


Richard James told his wife Betty, "I think I can make a toy out of this" and then spent the next two years figuring out the best steel gauge and coil to use for the toy. Betty James found a name for the new toy after discovering in the dictionary that the word "Slinky" is a Swedish word meaning traespiral - sleek or sinuous.

Slinky debuted at Gimbel's Department Store in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania during the 1945 Christmas season and then at the 1946 American Toy Fair. Richard nervous at the first demonstration of his toy convinced a friend to attend and buy the first Slinky. However, this turned out to be unnecessary as 400 were sold during the 90 minute Gimbel demonstration."

"What walks down stairs, alone or in pairs, And makes a slinkity sound?
A spring, a spring, a marvelous thing, Everyone knows its Slinky
It's Slinky, it's Slinky, for fun it's a wonderful toy
It's Slinky, it's Slinky, it's fun for a girl and a boy
- Advertising Jingle

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Joined: August 31st, 2003, 11:35 pm

March 31st, 2009, 1:04 am #2

Maybe he would enjoy having a SLINKY to accompany him as he uses all those ship ladders during Work Week ???
I bet it would be worth a few extra cookies if he let's SeaBat try it out also. I wonder if you can still get those nice stainless steel models as all I've seen lately is plastic deals that just don't carry the same momentum ;o(
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Joined: October 10th, 2005, 8:42 pm

March 31st, 2009, 4:17 am #3

"In 1943, Richard James was a naval engineer trying to develop a meter designed to monitor horsepower on naval battleships. Richard was working with tension springs when one of the springs fell to the ground. He saw how the spring kept moving after it hit the ground and an idea for a toy was born.


Richard James told his wife Betty, "I think I can make a toy out of this" and then spent the next two years figuring out the best steel gauge and coil to use for the toy. Betty James found a name for the new toy after discovering in the dictionary that the word "Slinky" is a Swedish word meaning traespiral - sleek or sinuous.

Slinky debuted at Gimbel's Department Store in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania during the 1945 Christmas season and then at the 1946 American Toy Fair. Richard nervous at the first demonstration of his toy convinced a friend to attend and buy the first Slinky. However, this turned out to be unnecessary as 400 were sold during the 90 minute Gimbel demonstration."

"What walks down stairs, alone or in pairs, And makes a slinkity sound?
A spring, a spring, a marvelous thing, Everyone knows its Slinky
It's Slinky, it's Slinky, for fun it's a wonderful toy
It's Slinky, it's Slinky, it's fun for a girl and a boy
- Advertising Jingle

I wonder if he would have thought that some Ham Rado operator would use a Slinky as a varible frequency dipole antenna?
Of course Hams will attempt to use anything as an antenna during Field Day.

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Joined: August 15th, 2007, 9:55 pm

March 31st, 2009, 4:30 am #4

I am in the process of putting up three antennas made out of SLINKYs.
1. 6 SLINKY full wave 160 meter loop, 2. a 160 meter dipole and
3. a 40 meter dipole. Will let the hams on this siteb know how they
work out.
Bob Wilder, AF2HD
AFD4AL USAF MARS (AFA4HD)
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Joined: December 22nd, 2008, 3:07 pm

March 31st, 2009, 12:53 pm #5

Maybe he would enjoy having a SLINKY to accompany him as he uses all those ship ladders during Work Week ???
I bet it would be worth a few extra cookies if he let's SeaBat try it out also. I wonder if you can still get those nice stainless steel models as all I've seen lately is plastic deals that just don't carry the same momentum ;o(
A Slinky, A Slinky the all American Toy, A Slinky, A Slinky for all the girls and boys, Everyone loves a Slinky - Hey Patty, I still have mine if you get tired of playing with the plastic one. I certainly plan to negotiate the ladders, but not with a slinky. I wonder if anyone knows exactly how many ladders are in/on the 325 before I can get there and count em. More importantly, I need to find out if the 325 still operates on the PUFSAD System? My biggest concern is not finding the bow door key, but the combination to the fridge? Is the Pepsi and BudLight provided? Maybe Seabat will bring jello shots instead of cookies.
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Joined: August 24th, 2003, 10:08 pm

April 1st, 2009, 12:36 am #6

"In 1943, Richard James was a naval engineer trying to develop a meter designed to monitor horsepower on naval battleships. Richard was working with tension springs when one of the springs fell to the ground. He saw how the spring kept moving after it hit the ground and an idea for a toy was born.


Richard James told his wife Betty, "I think I can make a toy out of this" and then spent the next two years figuring out the best steel gauge and coil to use for the toy. Betty James found a name for the new toy after discovering in the dictionary that the word "Slinky" is a Swedish word meaning traespiral - sleek or sinuous.

Slinky debuted at Gimbel's Department Store in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania during the 1945 Christmas season and then at the 1946 American Toy Fair. Richard nervous at the first demonstration of his toy convinced a friend to attend and buy the first Slinky. However, this turned out to be unnecessary as 400 were sold during the 90 minute Gimbel demonstration."

"What walks down stairs, alone or in pairs, And makes a slinkity sound?
A spring, a spring, a marvelous thing, Everyone knows its Slinky
It's Slinky, it's Slinky, for fun it's a wonderful toy
It's Slinky, it's Slinky, it's fun for a girl and a boy
- Advertising Jingle

WD-40: THE IRRESISTIBLE APPEAL OF A CORROSION-RESISTANT

Although WD-40 was basically developed and marketed for lubricating, consumer uses were discovered by accident. WD-40 Co., originally known as Rocket Chemical, developed the product almost 50 years ago for use on the skin of the Atlas missile, to displace water and fight corrosion. The name stands for Water Displacement, 40th formula, and the formula hasn't changed since then. Some of the engineers sneaked it out to their homes and used it for cleaning rust off sinks and started to find other uses. When the company started to market it outside the space program, it sold samples to mechanics from the trunks of cars. Now the liquid is sold in 160 countries, in sizes ranging from a pocket-sized canister to 55-gallon drums. It's used so many ways that the company asked consumers to share them in a "Search for 2,000 Uses" contest last year.

They expected "maybe 20,000 entries" but had more than 300,000. So many people sent stories and asked for the master list that the contest evolved a few months ago into the WD-40 Fan Club. It has more than 25,000 members and a staggering list of uses. You might have known it can clean golf clubs, remove sludge from boats or keep mud from sticking to bicycles. You might not have realized it is useful for lubricating magazines on AK-47 assault rifles. The following tale was reported by a WD-40 employee: a bus in the Far East wouldn't run because a python was stuck in the exhaust, until a spritz of WD-40 slipped it out. In another WD-40 story, he said there's the guy who was robbing a retail establishment and got stuck coming in through the roof. To slip him out, the cops sprayed him with WD-40. "They probably used a whole can." Some people spray it on lures to attract fish. But it's a petroleum distillate, so the company doesn't endorse its use in lakes or rivers for environmental reasons. Humans are another matter. Some people said it makes a great perfume. Arthritis sufferers spray it on joints to remedy inflammation, but WD-40 Co. has done no research and takes no position. There's never been FDA approval for WD-40 as a medical aid.

WD-40 uses can be viewed at www.wd40.com

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