My parting words for the evening

My parting words for the evening

Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2000 9:41 pm

Wed Aug 01, 2012 12:26 am #1

This is a column that Bob McKenzie wrote in the Toronto Star 9 years ago and I love the message.

Let's Keep Lacrosse Secret To Ourselves

taken from the Toronto Star Tuesday, September 14, 1993

It may have escaped your attention, but the 1993 lacrosse season

could end tonight in Coquitlam, B.C.

With a win over the hoemtown Adanacs, the Brampton Excelsiors will

wintheir second consecutive Mann Cup championship, emblematic fo senior

lacrosse supremacy in Canada.

One reason this may have dodged your notice is because the Mann Cup

barely rates a mention by most media outletsin the greater Metro area. A

second reason, and this undoubtedly helps to explain the first, is that

the averageToronto-area sports fan wouldn't know the difference between

between a lacrosse stick and a toothbrush.

All of which is a source of great consternation for many of the

followers of Canada's true national game.

Those of us who appreciatelacrosse for what it is - the world's greatest

game - often bemoan the factthat it is so cloaked in anonymity and lacks

the widespread appeal of a truly exciting sport, say baseball.

Well, at the risk of offending many well-intentioned missionaries who

persist in trying to sell a cult game to the vast unwashed masses, don't

sweat it.

Instead of grieving over the game's narrow following, we should be

exhibiting smugness for having such an exquisite palate.

It's kind of like being a huge fan of the Tragically Hip in the days of

"Small Town Bringdown." Or knowing that the world's finest fish and chips

are to be had at Duckworth's.

Some pleasures are actually enjoyed more when you know they are shared

by so few. And, if they happen, at some point, to become mainstream, so be

it. There's something to be said for having gotten in on the ground floor,

But I suspect aht's not going to happen with lacrosse, although there

may be somelimited evidence to the contrry.

The Major Indoor Lacrosse League, an indoor winter loop that packs Buffalo

Memorial Auditorium and Philadelphia's Spectrum, among others, is an example

of wildly successfulU.S. glitz and glamour marketing.

The MILL as it is known, provides a platform for the game's most dynamic

players, the Gait brothers (twins Gary and Paul), unparalleled scoring and

ball-handling wizards. But the MILL is a far cry from the brand of lacrosse

played each summer in hamlets all across Ontario.

It's a hybrid of lacrosse and the WWF, blar4ing rock music throughout

and constant patter from an annoucer egging on the novice, albeit, rabid,

fans. Traditional cross-checking is de-emphasized in favor of the speed game.

Exciting? Yes. But is it really lacrosse? Sort of.

If that's what has to be done to make the game popular here, then let's

keep it as a cult sport.

There is nothing quite so fine as going to the lovely burg of Brooklin

on a hot summer's night and checking out the Redmen of old Luther Vipond

Memorial Arena. Or going into the heart of Brampton to venerable Memorial

Arena to see the talent-laden Excelsiors. Or taking a hike uo to picturesque

Orangeville to see the Northmen capture the Minto Cup before a full house at

Tony Rose MemorialComplex.

If you have never witnessed the scoring exploits of playerssuch as

Brampton's John Tavares or Darris Kilgour, Brooklin's Greg Van Sickle and

Orangeville's Mike Murray, among others, you have missed seeing some of

Canada's finest athletes.

No game, at its elite level, lends itself to such artistry amid the

constant threat of physical brutality.

Yet it remains an incredibly safe game for the kids, especially when

compared to hockey or football. From Pelham to Peterborough, Windsor to

Whitby and Owen Sound to Orillia, there is a significant youth lacrosse

subculture out there almost every weekend of the summer.

Those who partake of it know its joy; those who don't, well, they don't

know what they're missing. And far be it for us to show them the light.


Let them watch baseball.









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Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2000 9:41 pm

Wed Aug 01, 2012 12:31 am #2

I corrected the typing mistakes
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Joined: Thu Jul 21, 2005 4:39 am

Wed Aug 01, 2012 4:57 am #3



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Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 9:12 pm

Wed Aug 01, 2012 10:53 am #4

I corrected the typing mistakes
Bobs words still ring true Wamp ,this Summer game is unique its history and the part it has played in many centers away from the big towns is a great story , one that should never be forgotten. Brampton, Brooklin, Hastings , Wallaceburg, Six Nations , Orangeville , Whitby and so on, places if you are not from Ontario may as well be on the Moon ,its part of Summer for a Ton of people from Urban and Rural Ontario, this is a glorious place in the Summer and Lacrosse is a part of this wonderful time. Thanks Wamp for doing your bit to keep the memories and traditions alive.
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Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 11:53 pm

Wed Aug 01, 2012 12:27 pm #5

This is a column that Bob McKenzie wrote in the Toronto Star 9 years ago and I love the message.

Let's Keep Lacrosse Secret To Ourselves

taken from the Toronto Star Tuesday, September 14, 1993

It may have escaped your attention, but the 1993 lacrosse season

could end tonight in Coquitlam, B.C.

With a win over the hoemtown Adanacs, the Brampton Excelsiors will

wintheir second consecutive Mann Cup championship, emblematic fo senior

lacrosse supremacy in Canada.

One reason this may have dodged your notice is because the Mann Cup

barely rates a mention by most media outletsin the greater Metro area. A

second reason, and this undoubtedly helps to explain the first, is that

the averageToronto-area sports fan wouldn't know the difference between

between a lacrosse stick and a toothbrush.

All of which is a source of great consternation for many of the

followers of Canada's true national game.

Those of us who appreciatelacrosse for what it is - the world's greatest

game - often bemoan the factthat it is so cloaked in anonymity and lacks

the widespread appeal of a truly exciting sport, say baseball.

Well, at the risk of offending many well-intentioned missionaries who

persist in trying to sell a cult game to the vast unwashed masses, don't

sweat it.

Instead of grieving over the game's narrow following, we should be

exhibiting smugness for having such an exquisite palate.

It's kind of like being a huge fan of the Tragically Hip in the days of

"Small Town Bringdown." Or knowing that the world's finest fish and chips

are to be had at Duckworth's.

Some pleasures are actually enjoyed more when you know they are shared

by so few. And, if they happen, at some point, to become mainstream, so be

it. There's something to be said for having gotten in on the ground floor,

But I suspect aht's not going to happen with lacrosse, although there

may be somelimited evidence to the contrry.

The Major Indoor Lacrosse League, an indoor winter loop that packs Buffalo

Memorial Auditorium and Philadelphia's Spectrum, among others, is an example

of wildly successfulU.S. glitz and glamour marketing.

The MILL as it is known, provides a platform for the game's most dynamic

players, the Gait brothers (twins Gary and Paul), unparalleled scoring and

ball-handling wizards. But the MILL is a far cry from the brand of lacrosse

played each summer in hamlets all across Ontario.

It's a hybrid of lacrosse and the WWF, blar4ing rock music throughout

and constant patter from an annoucer egging on the novice, albeit, rabid,

fans. Traditional cross-checking is de-emphasized in favor of the speed game.

Exciting? Yes. But is it really lacrosse? Sort of.

If that's what has to be done to make the game popular here, then let's

keep it as a cult sport.

There is nothing quite so fine as going to the lovely burg of Brooklin

on a hot summer's night and checking out the Redmen of old Luther Vipond

Memorial Arena. Or going into the heart of Brampton to venerable Memorial

Arena to see the talent-laden Excelsiors. Or taking a hike uo to picturesque

Orangeville to see the Northmen capture the Minto Cup before a full house at

Tony Rose MemorialComplex.

If you have never witnessed the scoring exploits of playerssuch as

Brampton's John Tavares or Darris Kilgour, Brooklin's Greg Van Sickle and

Orangeville's Mike Murray, among others, you have missed seeing some of

Canada's finest athletes.

No game, at its elite level, lends itself to such artistry amid the

constant threat of physical brutality.

Yet it remains an incredibly safe game for the kids, especially when

compared to hockey or football. From Pelham to Peterborough, Windsor to

Whitby and Owen Sound to Orillia, there is a significant youth lacrosse

subculture out there almost every weekend of the summer.

Those who partake of it know its joy; those who don't, well, they don't

know what they're missing. And far be it for us to show them the light.


Let them watch baseball.








She:kon!

Did Bob write this in 1993 or 1893?

Looked what has happened since then - the sport of lacrosse has exploded in popularity in the world.  I wonder if Bob envisioned the Czechs playing in a World Championship.  They didn't deserve to be there.  What a sham.  Prague is no Brooklin!   :'(

Skennen

...Tsitshoh...
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Joined: Wed Sep 29, 2004 1:11 pm

Wed Aug 01, 2012 12:39 pm #6

Thats sounds like you just trashed lacrosse in a big way Tsitshoh, did not like Bob but he did know his lacrosse as his kids did play in Whitby.
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Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 11:53 pm

Wed Aug 01, 2012 12:45 pm #7


She:kon!

So what?  I don't like him as a sports writer so I "trashed lacrosse in a big way."  That is a pile of crap and so was his column in 1993.  Gimme a break!

LOFL!

Skennen

...Tsitshoh...
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Joined: Wed Sep 29, 2004 1:11 pm

Wed Aug 01, 2012 12:57 pm #8

Really his Column now like l said l don't like the guy but he is a good writer and your post are, maybe give us all a be with some of your post.
back in the day Bob did alot for lacrosse and was the the only one that would even say anything about lacrosse on the air.
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Joined: Wed May 19, 2010 3:05 pm

Wed Aug 01, 2012 1:48 pm #9

She:kon!

So what?  I don't like him as a sports writer so I "trashed lacrosse in a big way."  That is a pile of crap and so was his column in 1993.  Gimme a break!

LOFL!

Skennen

...Tsitshoh...
That will help with the overwhelming press coverage expected in Whitby for the Minto (nm
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Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 11:53 pm

Wed Aug 01, 2012 3:16 pm #10

Are you expecting "overwhelming press coverage?" n/m
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