Managing a Team - Any Advice or Tips?

Managing a Team - Any Advice or Tips?

Joined: Wed Jul 08, 2009 4:08 pm

Tue Apr 27, 2010 4:25 pm #1

Hi, everyone.

I'm going to be managing a Novice team this year, and thought that I would pick the great brains of the OLA forums for any advice, tips, or resources that you might have.

For past/current managers - what has worked well for you, and what hasn't?

For coaches - at the end of the day, what do you want/need from your team manager?

For parents - what have you liked/disliked about your child's team managers in the past?

I've got some great people associated with the team to rely on (including last year's manager), but I thought that some fresh perspectives would also help.

THANKS!
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: Thu Jan 07, 2010 7:02 pm

Wed Apr 28, 2010 8:20 pm #2

I've been following this forum for some time and every spring some coach or manager gets on here looking for information for new coaches, managers, etc. You are lucky that you reside in an area where you have some experienced people that you can rely on, but most newbies , especially those in new areas just getting into box lacrosse , have nothing whatsoever for training. Nothing online, no DVDs, that any other respectable sport has in this regard. It's no wonder lacrosse loses so many coaches and players from frustration after trying the game for one or two seasons. Every year box lacrosse re-invents the wheel. I place this all on the national and provincial governing bodies of box lacrosse for their lack of vision and initiative. They are great at adopting the unproven LTAD, at writing bylaws that provide them with unlimited power, and flying all over the country all expenses paid to have face to face meetings that they could do on the web for a fraction of the cost, but they can't put a decent training program together. Not even a simple DVD showing new coaches some drills to run in a practice.Quite frankly, if my kids were of the age to start a sport, I certainly wouldn't suggest they take up box lacrosse which is a real shame because its a great game but its going nowhere.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: Mon Apr 05, 2010 2:23 am

Wed Apr 28, 2010 10:14 pm #3

There's plenty of stuff out there for new managers & coaches... and even players. Coaches clinics run all spring, the OLA site has DVDs, rule books, drill books, etc. that you can order from them that are useful for coaches AND players.

It's up to those with a newfound interest in the sport to take the initiative and not expect everything to be handed to them. Sorry if I sound harsh, but hey I LOVE the sport and it would be a shame if kids didn't get the opportunity to at least try the sport because an organization/coach/parent gave up looking for a dvd...

Order Forms for the Resource
http://www.ontariolacrosse.com/document ... t_1361.doc
http://www.ontariolacrosse.com/document ... t_1114.pdf
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: Mon Apr 05, 2010 2:23 am

Wed Apr 28, 2010 10:41 pm #4

Hi, everyone.

I'm going to be managing a Novice team this year, and thought that I would pick the great brains of the OLA forums for any advice, tips, or resources that you might have.

For past/current managers - what has worked well for you, and what hasn't?

For coaches - at the end of the day, what do you want/need from your team manager?

For parents - what have you liked/disliked about your child's team managers in the past?

I've got some great people associated with the team to rely on (including last year's manager), but I thought that some fresh perspectives would also help.

THANKS!
I had two kids in lacrosse and two VERY diffrent managers for each.

One, was great at keeping us parents notified of practices, games, scheduling, fundraising stuff for the team. He made an email list, a phone list, and even a text list (lol). Might have been a bit overkill at times for some parents, but I appreciated him always being on the ball, and us always knowing what was going on with the team.

If there were things to discuss, him & the coaches would hold little meetings in the locker rooms after practices. He'd have directions, arena maps, restaurant suggestions (hah!) at the last practice before a game. We would always know who we were playing and where we were going next month. If the coaches wanted to squeeze in an extra running or drill practice during the week, he would find space somewhere. He would ask us parents who is making it the games (because of course some kids couldn't make it all the time), but always made sure we had enough players.

The other manager was probably the exact opposite. We would only see her on game days, and everything was last minute. Last minute change in practice, last minute monies due, last mintute team changes, last minute fundraising (which really was a bit of a joke becuse we should have been doing that all season, and not the last month of the season). And we could never get in touch with her or she would never call back.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: Thu Jan 07, 2010 7:02 pm

Wed Apr 28, 2010 11:04 pm #5

So ,as an example, let's use your experience of dealing with a good manager or coach versus a poor one. Why does lacrosse not identify a "good" manager, and a "good" coach, and have them prepare a training DVD for new coaches and managers on being a good manager or good coach themselves. This would benefit the new coaches,the new managers, the new players and their parents, and probably make it easier for the coordinators because they were working with good new managers, and make it easier for referees because the new coaches knew the rules,and all these benefits would be felt all the way up to the governing bodies. The retention of volunteers and players is always cited as a problem, but the fact of the matter is, poor retention is not the problem, it is a symptom of poor planning and preparation by the governing bodies.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: Thu Jan 07, 2010 7:02 pm

Wed Apr 28, 2010 11:45 pm #6

There's plenty of stuff out there for new managers & coaches... and even players. Coaches clinics run all spring, the OLA site has DVDs, rule books, drill books, etc. that you can order from them that are useful for coaches AND players.

It's up to those with a newfound interest in the sport to take the initiative and not expect everything to be handed to them. Sorry if I sound harsh, but hey I LOVE the sport and it would be a shame if kids didn't get the opportunity to at least try the sport because an organization/coach/parent gave up looking for a dvd...

Order Forms for the Resource
http://www.ontariolacrosse.com/document ... t_1361.doc
http://www.ontariolacrosse.com/document ... t_1114.pdf
Lets start by critiquing the drill manual. Try giving that drill manual to a new coach ask him/her to figure out all the squiggly lines and have his/her players run a drill. That manual is greek to new coaches. However if there were a training DVD that a new coach could watch showing a bunch of players actually running a drill, a light bulb would go on in the new coaches head, and the new coaches' players would benefit immensely from learning the skills that the drills are meant to teach. A picture tells a hundred words, a video tells a thousand words. I've seen the CLA and OLA DVDs and quite frankly and it's quite obvious that the people compiling them have no understanding of how people learn. If you want to see some proper training DVDs, go to Championship Productions for examples of how its done. Volunteers lead busy lives and yes they need everything handed to them. The lacrosse clinic programs that you cite are run in the spring ,usually out of town, all weekend, right as hockey is winding down, and a million other things need to get done. Why not start the programs in the Fall online allowing the coaches to learn stress free from their home at their convenience. Thus when spring rolled around, the coaches would have a head start allowing them more time being coaches rather than students and coaches at the same time.Its time box lacrosse started using the technology of the times.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: Fri Jul 02, 2004 12:07 pm

Thu Apr 29, 2010 2:46 am #7

Did not beg for you to rant.
Let's start by introducing people to the game by being an inviting group, not bash things just because.

Now the question was "how to be a good manager".

The answer is 1) be on top of things so parents can get info as quickly as possible 2) be the grease so that coaches and parents understand each other and issues don't balloon and 3) PLAN for tournaments and the provs be a positive experience for the team (i.e- organize picnic lunches and team activities).
These 3 things will help your team be the best they can at being a team... which is what it is all about.

AND I forgot to mention SHUT UP ABOUT THE POLITICS... kids don't enjoy the endless BS about who else is not doing their job.

V.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: Mon Apr 05, 2010 2:23 am

Thu Apr 29, 2010 5:55 am #8

So ,as an example, let's use your experience of dealing with a good manager or coach versus a poor one. Why does lacrosse not identify a "good" manager, and a "good" coach, and have them prepare a training DVD for new coaches and managers on being a good manager or good coach themselves. This would benefit the new coaches,the new managers, the new players and their parents, and probably make it easier for the coordinators because they were working with good new managers, and make it easier for referees because the new coaches knew the rules,and all these benefits would be felt all the way up to the governing bodies. The retention of volunteers and players is always cited as a problem, but the fact of the matter is, poor retention is not the problem, it is a symptom of poor planning and preparation by the governing bodies.
Sure it would ideal for those organizations just getting into lacrosse to be provided with a basic guideline on how to properly run their club... but realistically, I don't see the OLA or CLA ever doing anything like that.

The rules don't change THAT dramatically. Get ahold of the rule book from your zone, read it, teach it, follow it and you shouldn't really have an issue with getting into trouble with refs.

At any rate, I don't think it falls onto the league to decide the standards for a potential lacrosse club. I think all that sort of standardization should come from the city/club/organization themselves. If an organizations is contemplating getting into lacrosse, they should be the ones to prepare their own coaching staff/managers. Or in the very least get these potential new to the game managers & coaches some peers or mentors to get help from when they are stuck.

I myself haven't been to the coaches clinics that are run throughout Spring, but that would be the first place these clubs should be sending their coaches to. If the organization is committed to the sport, potential coaches SHOULD make the effort to attend... being 'too busy' isn't any kind of excuse. Everyone is busy.. even the coaches who have to go back to get carded are busy, but they know they have to be there, so they are there.

The clinics are always out of town for 97% of the people attending them, so saying they are too far away isn't an excuse. Find the one closest to you as possible and make sure you're there. Some of our coaches had to go all the way to Wallaceburg because they missed the clinic in Orangeville (which was only an hour or so away) and they needed to be carded before 26th... so they were there.

But I digress. I would have loved that sort of standardization from my kids' managers, I would have loved if they were both wonderful and helpful, but it just wasn't to be. It's the same in any sport really. Honestly in all the sports my kids have played, I've never come across any coach or manager that was similar to another. They all have different methods, styles and personalities. Mostly good, with a few bad apples, but I don't blame that on the governing bodies, I blame that on my club for letting the bad ones get in... lol.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 11:53 pm

Thu Apr 29, 2010 12:07 pm #9

Hi, everyone.

I'm going to be managing a Novice team this year, and thought that I would pick the great brains of the OLA forums for any advice, tips, or resources that you might have.

For past/current managers - what has worked well for you, and what hasn't?

For coaches - at the end of the day, what do you want/need from your team manager?

For parents - what have you liked/disliked about your child's team managers in the past?

I've got some great people associated with the team to rely on (including last year's manager), but I thought that some fresh perspectives would also help.

THANKS!
She:kon!

I have never managed a team, but I have coached and been a parent and I have met some pretty good managers and here is what they had in common:
  • be the patient and calm conduit between the parents and the coaching staff; 24 hour rule in effect!</li>
  • be clear and up front about association and coaches expectations of players and parents;</li>
  • ensure that everyone is familiar with the team budget, all fees and fundraising requirements;</li>
  • ensure that everyone is familiar with game, practice, pictures and special events schedules and timely notices and reminders of any changes in those schedules;</li>
  • ensure that any travel requirements are planned well ahead of time including hotel reservations for overnight tournaments;</li>
  • ensure you are available to be a part of the team emergency plan;</li>
  • conference with coaches & association reps frequently and have regular parent meetings as well as being available to answer questions and concerns;</li>
  • be a positive influence on the team by demonstrating good sportsmanship at games and practices;</li>
I am sure there is more, but basically remember that you are the arranger, the scheduler, the facilitator, the go-to person for parents, players and coaches.  Oh and remember the most fundamental thing of them all: the main reason kids get involved in lacrosse is because it is fun.  Thus you may have to take the ring-leader initiative from time to time. 

Skennen

...Tsitshoh...




 
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: Wed Jul 08, 2009 4:08 pm

Thu Apr 29, 2010 12:23 pm #10

Did not beg for you to rant.
Let's start by introducing people to the game by being an inviting group, not bash things just because.

Now the question was "how to be a good manager".

The answer is 1) be on top of things so parents can get info as quickly as possible 2) be the grease so that coaches and parents understand each other and issues don't balloon and 3) PLAN for tournaments and the provs be a positive experience for the team (i.e- organize picnic lunches and team activities).
These 3 things will help your team be the best they can at being a team... which is what it is all about.

AND I forgot to mention SHUT UP ABOUT THE POLITICS... kids don't enjoy the endless BS about who else is not doing their job.

V.
Great advice - thanks!
Quote
Like
Share