Exactly!

Exactly!

Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2007 5:25 pm

Wed Feb 23, 2011 3:55 am #1

"Keep an open mind, work with your partner and superiors, and most importantly, communicate with the players and Coaches. By no means do you need to take abuse, but when you can effectively communicate with the teams on the floor, it really does go a long way to making your job a little less stressful and dare I say it; enjoyable."

Well said Gary! I think some of these young officials are misguided as to what constitutes abuse. I've never berated or abused a young ref, but it is frustrating for a coach when the young officials mistaken 'questioning a call' for 'abuse'.

Last year, I had the pleasure of having the best young referee I've ever seen. It was at the Beaches, first box game of the season... he made a call that I questioned him on, and he was more than willing to come over to the bench and give me his explaination. He was clearly wrong, but I affirmed his ruling and requested that he look it up when he got home after the game. I think he was shocked because I didn't argue it further... I didn't want the call reversed, but I did want to make him a better referee.

On the other side of the coin, I've had young referees refuse to explain their call and point to the crest on their shirt and say "This is the reason I don't have to talk to you".
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Joined: Wed May 08, 2002 7:38 pm

Wed Feb 23, 2011 2:10 pm #2

It's true. Give some a ref shirt and they think the show is about them. They strut around like Wyatt Earp. Untouchable in their own minds.

We do our best in clinics to teach these guys to use sound judgement and professionalism at all times and the guys who don't get it were likely too busy texting their girlfriend during that portion of the module. It's an easy thing to understand as adults but as with our youth in many aspects of their lives, even outside of officiating, some get it....and some don't.

I apppreciate when a coach talks with a younger official and is mindful of when he may be wrong. Talking with coaches and players is a art form that takes years of practise and some young officials just never grasp the true concept. If young officials can get over that intimidation factor and become comfortable with coaches, even the irate ones, we will have many more successful guys and gals in black.

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Joined: Wed May 08, 2002 7:38 pm

Wed Feb 23, 2011 2:10 pm #3

"Keep an open mind, work with your partner and superiors, and most importantly, communicate with the players and Coaches. By no means do you need to take abuse, but when you can effectively communicate with the teams on the floor, it really does go a long way to making your job a little less stressful and dare I say it; enjoyable."

Well said Gary! I think some of these young officials are misguided as to what constitutes abuse. I've never berated or abused a young ref, but it is frustrating for a coach when the young officials mistaken 'questioning a call' for 'abuse'.

Last year, I had the pleasure of having the best young referee I've ever seen. It was at the Beaches, first box game of the season... he made a call that I questioned him on, and he was more than willing to come over to the bench and give me his explaination. He was clearly wrong, but I affirmed his ruling and requested that he look it up when he got home after the game. I think he was shocked because I didn't argue it further... I didn't want the call reversed, but I did want to make him a better referee.

On the other side of the coin, I've had young referees refuse to explain their call and point to the crest on their shirt and say "This is the reason I don't have to talk to you".
It's true. Give some a ref shirt and they think the show is about them. They strut around like Wyatt Earp. Untouchable in their own minds.

We do our best in clinics to teach these guys to use sound judgement and professionalism at all times and the guys who don't get it were likely too busy texting their girlfriend during that portion of the module. It's an easy thing to understand as adults but as with our youth in many aspects of their lives, even outside of officiating, some get it....and some don't.

I apppreciate when a coach talks with a younger official and is mindful of when he may be wrong. Talking with coaches and players is a art form that takes years of practise and some young officials just never grasp the true concept. If young officials can get over that intimidation factor and become comfortable with coaches, even the irate ones, we will have many more successful guys and gals in black.

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Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 11:53 pm

Wed Feb 23, 2011 5:32 pm #4

It's true. Give some a ref shirt and they think the show is about them. They strut around like Wyatt Earp. Untouchable in their own minds.

We do our best in clinics to teach these guys to use sound judgement and professionalism at all times and the guys who don't get it were likely too busy texting their girlfriend during that portion of the module. It's an easy thing to understand as adults but as with our youth in many aspects of their lives, even outside of officiating, some get it....and some don't.

I apppreciate when a coach talks with a younger official and is mindful of when he may be wrong. Talking with coaches and players is a art form that takes years of practise and some young officials just never grasp the true concept. If young officials can get over that intimidation factor and become comfortable with coaches, even the irate ones, we will have many more successful guys and gals in black.
She:kon!

Forget this "guys and gals in black" business.  They should be in stripes like other all legit sports, including field!

)

Skennen

...Tsitshoh...
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Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2001 3:22 pm

Wed Feb 23, 2011 6:51 pm #5

basketball grey
soccer a rainbow
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Joined: Mon Jul 01, 2002 2:30 pm

Wed Feb 23, 2011 7:03 pm #6

It's true. Give some a ref shirt and they think the show is about them. They strut around like Wyatt Earp. Untouchable in their own minds.

We do our best in clinics to teach these guys to use sound judgement and professionalism at all times and the guys who don't get it were likely too busy texting their girlfriend during that portion of the module. It's an easy thing to understand as adults but as with our youth in many aspects of their lives, even outside of officiating, some get it....and some don't.

I apppreciate when a coach talks with a younger official and is mindful of when he may be wrong. Talking with coaches and players is a art form that takes years of practise and some young officials just never grasp the true concept. If young officials can get over that intimidation factor and become comfortable with coaches, even the irate ones, we will have many more successful guys and gals in black.
I think that it is a pretty good sign that the President of the OLRA is willing to contribute and share information whether it bo to an old "has been" that has a lacrosse web site, or on here in discussions.

This is the sort of communication I hope all officials can take an example from. And he doesn't do a bad job on the floor either (although I could always questions a call here and there).
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Joined: Sun May 13, 2001 12:35 am

Wed Feb 23, 2011 7:19 pm #7

It's true. Give some a ref shirt and they think the show is about them. They strut around like Wyatt Earp. Untouchable in their own minds.

We do our best in clinics to teach these guys to use sound judgement and professionalism at all times and the guys who don't get it were likely too busy texting their girlfriend during that portion of the module. It's an easy thing to understand as adults but as with our youth in many aspects of their lives, even outside of officiating, some get it....and some don't.

I apppreciate when a coach talks with a younger official and is mindful of when he may be wrong. Talking with coaches and players is a art form that takes years of practise and some young officials just never grasp the true concept. If young officials can get over that intimidation factor and become comfortable with coaches, even the irate ones, we will have many more successful guys and gals in black.
Sometimes just give some one a position of authority and they too think they are in the wild west, where no one dare question them. I guess its human nature. Some people just let a little power get to their head. We have all seen them,coaches, administrators, officials and people you meet in everyday life at work and socially...Power or perceived power is an addictive drug and it feeds the ego for some unfortunately.
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Joined: Wed May 08, 2002 7:38 pm

Wed Feb 23, 2011 9:02 pm #8

She:kon!

Forget this "guys and gals in black" business.  They should be in stripes like other all legit sports, including field!

)

Skennen

...Tsitshoh...
Always gotta open that debate up. Haha.
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Joined: Wed May 08, 2002 7:38 pm

Wed Feb 23, 2011 9:04 pm #9

Sometimes just give some one a position of authority and they too think they are in the wild west, where no one dare question them. I guess its human nature. Some people just let a little power get to their head. We have all seen them,coaches, administrators, officials and people you meet in everyday life at work and socially...Power or perceived power is an addictive drug and it feeds the ego for some unfortunately.
Agreed
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Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 11:53 pm

Wed Feb 23, 2011 9:41 pm #10

basketball grey
soccer a rainbow
She:kon!

More basketball refs wear stripes.   And so does this soccer referee

Skennen

...Tsitshoh...
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