A Fair Country : Telling Truths about CAnada

A Fair Country : Telling Truths about CAnada

Joined: Wed Aug 29, 2007 1:18 am

Fri Aug 05, 2011 8:43 pm #1

not a bad book. i've read half of it but i'm a little more interested in The Doubter's Companion.

anyways, you can throw books and authors and quotes at me all you want. disecting my "instutional" misspellings is fun too. taking my point concerning the enslavement of my family by alcohol is one i can't let pass for it was not literal enslavement of course. it was battering of spirit and the hollowing of a proud people by a terrible corrosive poisonous force. alcohol is, was and will always be a symbol of enslavement of the spirit for us.thankfully i was raised in a sober home and i am a proud sober indian.

J.R. Saul "we have problems we know must be solved....yet we seem rarely able to solve them.at best we stitch together bits and pieces, as if we were paupers in a rag yard."

here's a good one for institutionalized "bigotry" in Southern Ontario....W.P. Kinsella "Web of Hate". funny how 150 years later places that dot the lacrosse map are well referenced in this book for their ultra right wing and bigoted practices.

have a nice weekend
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Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2002 5:22 pm

Fri Aug 05, 2011 9:49 pm #2

I find it increasingly frustrating that the moderator gives himself the last word then locks the thread. Forum means expressing a diversity of opinions that don't necessarily have to agree. Anyway the writing is on the wall, "be good or be gone" so I agree,your ball your bat.
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Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 11:53 pm

Fri Aug 05, 2011 10:31 pm #3


She:kon!

I locked the other thread due to severe thread drift.  However, you can play historian here if you like.  I won't be locking it down unless it gets nasty, like anything else.

So please, do share...  LOFL!

Skennen

...Tsitshoh...
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Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 11:53 pm

Fri Aug 05, 2011 10:49 pm #4

not a bad book. i've read half of it but i'm a little more interested in The Doubter's Companion.

anyways, you can throw books and authors and quotes at me all you want. disecting my "instutional" misspellings is fun too. taking my point concerning the enslavement of my family by alcohol is one i can't let pass for it was not literal enslavement of course. it was battering of spirit and the hollowing of a proud people by a terrible corrosive poisonous force. alcohol is, was and will always be a symbol of enslavement of the spirit for us.thankfully i was raised in a sober home and i am a proud sober indian.

J.R. Saul "we have problems we know must be solved....yet we seem rarely able to solve them.at best we stitch together bits and pieces, as if we were paupers in a rag yard."

here's a good one for institutionalized "bigotry" in Southern Ontario....W.P. Kinsella "Web of Hate". funny how 150 years later places that dot the lacrosse map are well referenced in this book for their ultra right wing and bigoted practices.

have a nice weekend
She:kon!

Actually 'Reflections of a Siamese Twin' is a very good book, his best I think.  It should be used to teach Canadian History in high school.  'Fair Country' is more of a continuation of the opening sentiment in 'Reflections' regarding the false dichotomy of 'the two solitudes.' 

At any rate, you tell me I can " throw books and authors and quotes at me all you want" and then you toss Kinsella at me.  Nice.  LOL.  I also note that in the car dealership and Macs Milk maps, practically all the same towns are well referenced for their ultra right wing and bigoted practices.



Skennen

...Tsitshoh...
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Joined: Fri Jun 10, 2005 12:14 pm

Sat Aug 06, 2011 12:11 am #5

She:kon!

I locked the other thread due to severe thread drift.  However, you can play historian here if you like.  I won't be locking it down unless it gets nasty, like anything else.

So please, do share...  LOFL!

Skennen

...Tsitshoh...
This is quite interesting. From reading threads and posts over the years I always thought that Mr. Tsitshoh was a native or at least a strong backer of natives. Yet here we have a disagreement about the use of alcohol. I'm not native but as youngun" I was very interested in the native culture. I do however have to interject here and say that I agree with Townline tornado in regards to the use of alcohol and how it was used against the natives by the "settlers". There is enough proof in the history books (written by white men) that attest the use of alcohol to take advantage of them.
That and lets be realistic here the H.H.'s coaching staff has been known to be quite classless at times. That and the fact that anybody on that staff would make references to drinking with some of the coaching staff they have. Mr. McCauly has a lot to be desired it comes to etiquette
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Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2002 5:22 pm

Sat Aug 06, 2011 1:27 am #6

She:kon!

I locked the other thread due to severe thread drift.  However, you can play historian here if you like.  I won't be locking it down unless it gets nasty, like anything else.

So please, do share...  LOFL!

Skennen

...Tsitshoh...
Ok, I don't want to do a history lesson but I will tell you this. The book you referred to was written by a white guy who lived from 1932 to 2004. Mine was written by a Seneca chief who lived from 1828 to 1895. His name was Ely Parker.He was an attorney, an engineer, a tribal diplomat and from 1869 to 1871 he was the first native to be appointed Commissioner of Indian Affairs. He wrote his book after a lot of research and some financing from an author named Henry Morgan. I would rather learn indian history from an indian. The book is called League of Iroquois. Now back to lacrosse I guess.
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Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 11:53 pm

Sat Aug 06, 2011 1:53 am #7


She:kon!

The Indians I learn Indian history from, through personal research as well as esteemed authors like JV Wright, are much, much older than Ely Parker and left their stories in materials like ceramics and lithics, village sites and mythologies.  You may want to seek updated material right?  The body of knowledge has been expanded somewhat since, you know, the 19th century.  o_O

Skennen

...Tsitshoh...
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Joined: Tue Oct 29, 2002 11:53 pm

Sat Aug 06, 2011 2:07 am #8

This is quite interesting. From reading threads and posts over the years I always thought that Mr. Tsitshoh was a native or at least a strong backer of natives. Yet here we have a disagreement about the use of alcohol. I'm not native but as youngun" I was very interested in the native culture. I do however have to interject here and say that I agree with Townline tornado in regards to the use of alcohol and how it was used against the natives by the "settlers". There is enough proof in the history books (written by white men) that attest the use of alcohol to take advantage of them.
That and lets be realistic here the H.H.'s coaching staff has been known to be quite classless at times. That and the fact that anybody on that staff would make references to drinking with some of the coaching staff they have. Mr. McCauly has a lot to be desired it comes to etiquette
She:kon!

Don't get me wrong, I am not denying the damage done to communities through the use and abuse of alcohol.  What I am saying is that the actual "subjugation" of historic First Nations people was the direct result of treaties, agreements and legislation like the Indian Act, not alcohol.

Skennen

...Tsitshoh...

 
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Joined: Mon Feb 28, 2011 7:59 pm

Sat Aug 06, 2011 12:25 pm #9

This is quite interesting. From reading threads and posts over the years I always thought that Mr. Tsitshoh was a native or at least a strong backer of natives. Yet here we have a disagreement about the use of alcohol. I'm not native but as youngun" I was very interested in the native culture. I do however have to interject here and say that I agree with Townline tornado in regards to the use of alcohol and how it was used against the natives by the "settlers". There is enough proof in the history books (written by white men) that attest the use of alcohol to take advantage of them.
That and lets be realistic here the H.H.'s coaching staff has been known to be quite classless at times. That and the fact that anybody on that staff would make references to drinking with some of the coaching staff they have. Mr. McCauly has a lot to be desired it comes to etiquette
ya Mr. Ruys, and your at the top of the class when it comes to etiquette big fella, you start fights in the stands more than a hormone raging teenager... GROW UP
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Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2001 3:22 pm

Sat Aug 06, 2011 5:20 pm #10

She:kon!

Actually 'Reflections of a Siamese Twin' is a very good book, his best I think.  It should be used to teach Canadian History in high school.  'Fair Country' is more of a continuation of the opening sentiment in 'Reflections' regarding the false dichotomy of 'the two solitudes.' 

At any rate, you tell me I can " throw books and authors and quotes at me all you want" and then you toss Kinsella at me.  Nice.  LOL.  I also note that in the car dealership and Macs Milk maps, practically all the same towns are well referenced for their ultra right wing and bigoted practices.



Skennen

...Tsitshoh...
To respond to what you entered in the other thread. Never said that the "Iroquoian" culture developed elsewhere I t did indeed develop in southern Ontario. Remember also that culture was shared by what came to be the confederation south of the Great Lakes, and the Huron Neutral etc. north of the lakes. Linguistic and archaeological evidence both point to some sort of schism in the 1400's causing some to move south, some to move west and some to move north. The Huron were not wiped out in the 1300s as the Jesuit mission to the Huron (Saint Marie) was built in the early 1600s. I too have read --- probably in the excess og 100,000 pages in pursuit of a degree. I have also worked on several "Iroquoian" sites in southern Ontario. I could write pages and pages in support of my thesis, but will stop here.
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