Slight OD of popular EFFEXOR !!! antidepressant could cause death

Slight OD of popular EFFEXOR !!! antidepressant could cause death

Joined: April 1st, 2004, 4:56 pm

March 2nd, 2007, 11:23 am #1

Slight OD of popular antidepressant could cause death



Pamela Fayerman, CanWest News Service; Vancouver Sun
Published: Tuesday, February 27, 2007 Article tools
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VANCOUVER- B.C. doctors are being put on alert that the most commonly prescribed antidepressant in B.C. is increasingly being observed to have toxic overdose consequences such as seizures and even deaths.

"We are alerting doctors about our concerns to give them a heads-up that it is a potential concern because it appears it is more toxic than it was originally hoped it would be," Derek Daws, managing director of the B.C. Drug and Poison Information Centre said in an interview Monday, referring to the medication called venlafaxine whose brand name is Effexor.



B.C. pharmacists filled 621,000 prescriptions for the popular prescription medication last year, according to IMS Health, an Ottawa-based pharmaceutical sales tracking agency. In 2006, there were more than three million prescriptions filled for all anti-depressants for B.C. residents. The proper Effexor dose is 75 to 225 milligrams/day in adults (up to 5.5 mg/kilogram in children) but overdoses requiring hospitalization have occurred in those taking just a little more than the recommended top range.

The drug, a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) has been available in Canada since 1994 and was initially thought to have a safer overdose profile than other antidepressant drugs.

"Since this initial optimism, however, the toxic consequences of venlafaxine overdose quickly became evident," according to an article in the current B.C. Medical Journal by Janet Webb, a pharmacist with the Poison Control Centre at the B.C. Drug and Poison Information Centre.

Daws said Effexor is still a safe and highly effective antidepressant when taken at the appropriate dosage. But the poison control centre received 548 calls last year in which the drug was involved in cases of potential toxicity. The centre fielded another 292 calls relating to another class of antidepressant medications called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's). The centre receives a total of 40,000 calls each year.

In her article titled Venlafaxine: Troubling Toxicity in Overdose, Webb states the manufacturer of the drug, Wyeth, has been accumulating evidence of fatalities relating to deliberate or accidental overdoses and the pharmaceutical company advises "that the risk of fatal outcome following venlafaxine overdose may be increased compared with SSRI antidepressants but is lower than that following TCA (tricyclic) overdose."

Vancouver Sun

pfayerman@png.canwest.com

© CanWest News Service 2007
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March 2nd, 2007, 11:24 am #2




BC Medical Journal Volume 49, Number 1, January/February 2007, page 10



http://www.bcma.org/public/bc_medical_j ... 07/cdc.asp




BC Centre for Disease Control



Venlafaxine: Troubling toxicity in overdose



Venlafaxine (Effexor), a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, entered the Canadian market in 1994. As with any new medication, experience with overdose was extremely limited when venlafaxine was introduced. Although only 12 suicide attempts had been recorded at launch, because there were no deaths and only one seizure, it was hoped that it would be safer in overdose than other antidepressants.[1] Since this initial optimism, however, the toxic consequences of venlafaxine overdose quickly became evident. By 1996, numerous overdose cases from poison centres reported tachycardia, hypotension, seizures, coma, serotonin syndrome, and death.[2-8]

The relative toxicity of venlafaxine in overdose compared with other antidepressants was first highlighted in an analysis of United Kingdom mortality data published in 2002.[9] In overdose from a single antidepressant, venlafaxine was found to have a fatal toxicity index of 13.2 deaths/million prescriptions (95% CI 9.2¨C18.5), which was comparable to clomipramine (12.5 deaths/million prescriptions; 95% CI 9.4¨C16.3). Among serotonergic antidepressants, the maximum fatal toxicity index was 3.0 deaths/million prescriptions (95% CI 0.3¨C10.9) for fluvoxamine. Venlafaxine has been found to result in a greater likelihood of ICU admissions than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)[10] and appears more likely than SSRIs to cause serotonin syndrome, seizures, and QRS prolongation to ¡Ý100 msec.[10] Venlafaxine has similar ECG changes to those observed with tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) overdosage, exhibiting QRS widening and QTc interval prolongation, possibly due to sodium-channel blockade.[11] The odds ratio of venlafaxine causing seizures compared with TCAs is estimated to be 4.4 (95% CI 1.4¨C13.8).[10]

The Poison Control Centre at BC¡¯s Drug and Poison Information Centre (DPIC) has had over a decade of involvement with venlafaxine overdose management. DPIC experience is consistent with published literature, with numerous cases of both adults and teens exhibiting tachycardia, hypotension, serotonin syndrome, and precipitous seizures following venlafaxine overdose as well as cases of QTc prolongation and QRS widening. In the interest of patient safety and pharmacovigilance, DPIC continues to gather data on venlafaxine overdose in BC, to advise on case management, and to follow up for outcomes. Accumulating evidence of fatalities has recently prompted Wyeth in the United States to revise its Effexor prescribing information.[12] They advise that the risk of fatal outcome following venlafaxine overdose may be increased compared with SSRI antidepressants but is lower than that following TCA overdose.

To increase awareness of the serious problems with venlafaxine overdose, DPIC has recently highlighted venlafaxine toxicity in its Toxic Update Newsletter. This is being distributed to emergency departments and interested physicians throughout BC. To obtain a copy or to be placed on the newsletter distribution list, e-mail your request to info@dpic.ca.

¡ªJanet Webb, BSc(Pharm), MSc



References

1. Montgomery SA. Venlafaxine: A new dimension in antidepressant pharmacotherapy. J Clin Psychiatry 1993;54:119-126. PubMed Citation

2. Woo OF, Vredenburg M, Freitas P, et al. Seizures after venlafaxine overdose: A case report. J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 1995;33:549-550.

3. Durback LF, Scharman EJ. Seizures associated with venlafaxine overdose. J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 1996;34:557.

4. Dahl B, Crouch BI, Rollins D. Death from venlafaxine overdose (Effexor). J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 1996;34:557.

5. Peano C, Wahl M, Keyes N, et al. Seizures and ventricular tachycardia secondary to venlafaxine and lamotrigine. J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 1996;34:558.

6. Fantaskey A, Burkhart KK. A case report of venlafaxine toxicity. J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 1995;33:359-361. PubMed Abstract

7. Kolecki P, Miller M. Isolated venlafaxine-induced serotonin syndrome. J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 1996;34:558-558.

8. Kokan L, Dart RC. Life-threatening hypotension from venlafaxine overdose. J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 1996;34:559.

9. Buckley NA, McManus PR. Fatal toxicity of serotonergic and other antidepressant drugs: Analysis of United Kingdom mortality data. BMJ 2002;325:1332-1333. PubMed Abstract Full Text

10. Whyte IM, Dawson AH, Buckley NA. Relative toxicity of venlafaxine and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in overdose compared to tricyclic antidepressants. Q J Med 2003;96:369-374. PubMed Abstract Full Text

11. Combes A, Peytavin G, Theron D. Conduction disturbances associated with venlafaxine. Ann Intern Med 2001;134:166-167. PubMed Citation Full Text

12. Camardo J (Wyeth Global Medical Affairs). Dear Health Care Provider Letter. 17 October 2006. www.fda.gov/medWatch/safety/2006/safety06.htm#Effexor (accessed 25 October 2006).






Last edited by Ch_Isp_Morse on March 2nd, 2007, 11:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 1st, 2004, 4:56 pm

March 2nd, 2007, 11:35 am #3

Slight OD of popular antidepressant could cause death



Pamela Fayerman, CanWest News Service; Vancouver Sun
Published: Tuesday, February 27, 2007 Article tools
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http://www.canada.com/topics/bodyandhea ... e3&k=89594



VANCOUVER- B.C. doctors are being put on alert that the most commonly prescribed antidepressant in B.C. is increasingly being observed to have toxic overdose consequences such as seizures and even deaths.

"We are alerting doctors about our concerns to give them a heads-up that it is a potential concern because it appears it is more toxic than it was originally hoped it would be," Derek Daws, managing director of the B.C. Drug and Poison Information Centre said in an interview Monday, referring to the medication called venlafaxine whose brand name is Effexor.



B.C. pharmacists filled 621,000 prescriptions for the popular prescription medication last year, according to IMS Health, an Ottawa-based pharmaceutical sales tracking agency. In 2006, there were more than three million prescriptions filled for all anti-depressants for B.C. residents. The proper Effexor dose is 75 to 225 milligrams/day in adults (up to 5.5 mg/kilogram in children) but overdoses requiring hospitalization have occurred in those taking just a little more than the recommended top range.

The drug, a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) has been available in Canada since 1994 and was initially thought to have a safer overdose profile than other antidepressant drugs.

"Since this initial optimism, however, the toxic consequences of venlafaxine overdose quickly became evident," according to an article in the current B.C. Medical Journal by Janet Webb, a pharmacist with the Poison Control Centre at the B.C. Drug and Poison Information Centre.

Daws said Effexor is still a safe and highly effective antidepressant when taken at the appropriate dosage. But the poison control centre received 548 calls last year in which the drug was involved in cases of potential toxicity. The centre fielded another 292 calls relating to another class of antidepressant medications called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's). The centre receives a total of 40,000 calls each year.

In her article titled Venlafaxine: Troubling Toxicity in Overdose, Webb states the manufacturer of the drug, Wyeth, has been accumulating evidence of fatalities relating to deliberate or accidental overdoses and the pharmaceutical company advises "that the risk of fatal outcome following venlafaxine overdose may be increased compared with SSRI antidepressants but is lower than that following TCA (tricyclic) overdose."

Vancouver Sun

pfayerman@png.canwest.com

© CanWest News Service 2007
The proper Effexor dose is 75 to 225 milligrams/day in adults (up to 5.5 mg/kilogram in children) but overdoses requiring hospitalization have occurred in those taking just a little more than the recommended top range.




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Joined: April 1st, 2004, 4:56 pm

March 2nd, 2007, 11:40 am #4

I'd be taking 550mgs which is more than twice the makers recomended max of 225mgs


no wonder children have problems on this muck !!!
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March 2nd, 2007, 11:46 am #5

Slight OD of popular antidepressant could cause death



Pamela Fayerman, CanWest News Service; Vancouver Sun
Published: Tuesday, February 27, 2007 Article tools
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http://www.canada.com/topics/bodyandhea ... e3&k=89594



VANCOUVER- B.C. doctors are being put on alert that the most commonly prescribed antidepressant in B.C. is increasingly being observed to have toxic overdose consequences such as seizures and even deaths.

"We are alerting doctors about our concerns to give them a heads-up that it is a potential concern because it appears it is more toxic than it was originally hoped it would be," Derek Daws, managing director of the B.C. Drug and Poison Information Centre said in an interview Monday, referring to the medication called venlafaxine whose brand name is Effexor.



B.C. pharmacists filled 621,000 prescriptions for the popular prescription medication last year, according to IMS Health, an Ottawa-based pharmaceutical sales tracking agency. In 2006, there were more than three million prescriptions filled for all anti-depressants for B.C. residents. The proper Effexor dose is 75 to 225 milligrams/day in adults (up to 5.5 mg/kilogram in children) but overdoses requiring hospitalization have occurred in those taking just a little more than the recommended top range.

The drug, a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) has been available in Canada since 1994 and was initially thought to have a safer overdose profile than other antidepressant drugs.

"Since this initial optimism, however, the toxic consequences of venlafaxine overdose quickly became evident," according to an article in the current B.C. Medical Journal by Janet Webb, a pharmacist with the Poison Control Centre at the B.C. Drug and Poison Information Centre.

Daws said Effexor is still a safe and highly effective antidepressant when taken at the appropriate dosage. But the poison control centre received 548 calls last year in which the drug was involved in cases of potential toxicity. The centre fielded another 292 calls relating to another class of antidepressant medications called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's). The centre receives a total of 40,000 calls each year.

In her article titled Venlafaxine: Troubling Toxicity in Overdose, Webb states the manufacturer of the drug, Wyeth, has been accumulating evidence of fatalities relating to deliberate or accidental overdoses and the pharmaceutical company advises "that the risk of fatal outcome following venlafaxine overdose may be increased compared with SSRI antidepressants but is lower than that following TCA (tricyclic) overdose."

Vancouver Sun

pfayerman@png.canwest.com

© CanWest News Service 2007

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Font: * * Pamela Fayerman, Vancouver Sun
Published: Tuesday, February 27, 2007

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In the Canadian Medical Association Journal last month, Effexor was also the subject of a Health and Drug Alert bulletin noting that the manufacturer was changing prescribing information because of four published studies showing that it had a much higher risk of death than SSRI drugs. Doctors are now being cautioned that prescriptions for Effexor should be written for the smallest quantity to reduce overdose risk. Symptoms can include drowsiness, seizures, low or high blood pressure, heart rhythm disturbances and comas.

In international studies based on coroner investigations and autopsy lab results, patients on Effexor had an overdose death rate of anywhere from 4.4 per million prescriptions to 13.2 per million prescriptions.

That compares with an overdose death rate of about one per million prescriptions among patients using the SSRI class of drugs.

The annual suicide rate in Canada is about 13.5 per 100,000 in the general population and deliberate antidepressant overdoses account for up to seven per cent of all suicides, according to the CMAJ piece.

The reasons for the increased overdose fatalities associated with Effexor are unclear as scientists consider whether there is a true toxic effect or a "spurious effect" related to its use in severely depressed individuals, compared with those prescribed SSRIs. It may be a combination of factors.

A study in the United Kingdom showed that patients prescribed venlafaxine were more likely than patients prescribed SSRIs to have been admitted to hospital for depression, to have suicidal tendencies and to have received prescriptions for other medications.

In other news related to depression Monday, Statistics Canada released a report called Depression and Work Impairment that examines the prevalence and effect of depression among working Canadians aged 25 to 64. The report says that nearly half a million people -- or almost four per cent of workers -- acknowledged they had an episode of depression in 2001 and that another million -- or eight per cent -- said they had had a depressive episode earlier in their lives.

Men were half as likely as women to report depression and so were married individuals, compared with those who were divorced, separated or widowed.

White-collar workers and those in sales and service jobs were more likely than blue collar workers to have depression. On average, depressed workers reported 32 days in the past year when their symptoms meant they could not work or do other normal activities.

pfayerman@png.canwest.com

- - -

EFFEXOR:

- There were more than 3.2 million antidepressant prescriptions filled last year in B.C.

- The most popular is Effexor at 621,000 prescriptions.

- It works by by affecting two naturally occurring brain chemicals, serotonin and norepinephrine.

Source: Vancouver Sun, Wyeth Pharmaceuticals Inc.

You can now listen to every Vancouver Sun story on our new digital edition.

Free to full-week print subscribers or sign up for a 7-day free trial.

www.vancouversun.com/digital.

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March 2nd, 2007, 11:48 am #6

In international studies based on coroner investigations and autopsy lab results, patients on Effexor had an overdose death rate of anywhere from 4.4 per million prescriptions to 13.2 per million prescriptions.

That compares with an overdose death rate of about one per million prescriptions among patients using the SSRI class of drugs.
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March 2nd, 2007, 11:58 am #7

Slight OD of popular antidepressant could cause death



Pamela Fayerman, CanWest News Service; Vancouver Sun
Published: Tuesday, February 27, 2007 Article tools
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http://www.canada.com/topics/bodyandhea ... e3&k=89594



VANCOUVER- B.C. doctors are being put on alert that the most commonly prescribed antidepressant in B.C. is increasingly being observed to have toxic overdose consequences such as seizures and even deaths.

"We are alerting doctors about our concerns to give them a heads-up that it is a potential concern because it appears it is more toxic than it was originally hoped it would be," Derek Daws, managing director of the B.C. Drug and Poison Information Centre said in an interview Monday, referring to the medication called venlafaxine whose brand name is Effexor.



B.C. pharmacists filled 621,000 prescriptions for the popular prescription medication last year, according to IMS Health, an Ottawa-based pharmaceutical sales tracking agency. In 2006, there were more than three million prescriptions filled for all anti-depressants for B.C. residents. The proper Effexor dose is 75 to 225 milligrams/day in adults (up to 5.5 mg/kilogram in children) but overdoses requiring hospitalization have occurred in those taking just a little more than the recommended top range.

The drug, a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) has been available in Canada since 1994 and was initially thought to have a safer overdose profile than other antidepressant drugs.

"Since this initial optimism, however, the toxic consequences of venlafaxine overdose quickly became evident," according to an article in the current B.C. Medical Journal by Janet Webb, a pharmacist with the Poison Control Centre at the B.C. Drug and Poison Information Centre.

Daws said Effexor is still a safe and highly effective antidepressant when taken at the appropriate dosage. But the poison control centre received 548 calls last year in which the drug was involved in cases of potential toxicity. The centre fielded another 292 calls relating to another class of antidepressant medications called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's). The centre receives a total of 40,000 calls each year.

In her article titled Venlafaxine: Troubling Toxicity in Overdose, Webb states the manufacturer of the drug, Wyeth, has been accumulating evidence of fatalities relating to deliberate or accidental overdoses and the pharmaceutical company advises "that the risk of fatal outcome following venlafaxine overdose may be increased compared with SSRI antidepressants but is lower than that following TCA (tricyclic) overdose."

Vancouver Sun

pfayerman@png.canwest.com

© CanWest News Service 2007




Am J Psychiatry 164:290-300, February 2007
doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.164.2.290
© 2007 American Psychiatric Association



http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/con ... /164/2/290


Efficacy and Safety of Extended-Release Venlafaxine in the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Two Placebo-Controlled Trials
Moira A. Rynn, M.D., Mark A. Riddle, M.D., Paul P. Yeung, M.D., M.P.H. and Nadia R. Kunz, Pharm.D.
OBJECTIVE: The authors evaluated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of extended-release venlafaxine in the treatment of pediatric generalized anxiety disorder. METHOD: Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials were conducted at 59 sites in 2000 and 2001. Participants 6 to 17 years of age who met DSM-IV criteria for generalized anxiety disorder received a flexible dosage of extended-release venlafaxine (N=157) or placebo (N=163) for 8 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the composite score for nine delineated items from the generalized anxiety disorder section of a modified version of the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, and the primary efficacy variable was the baseline-to-endpoint change in this composite score. Secondary outcome measures were overall score on the nine delineated items, Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders, and the severity of illness and improvement scores from the Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI). RESULTS: The extended-release venlafaxine group showed statistically significant improvements in the primary and secondary outcome measures in study 1 and significant improvements in some secondary outcome measures but not the primary outcome measure in study 2. In a pooled analysis, the extended-release venlafaxine group showed a significantly greater mean decrease in the primary outcome measure compared with the placebo group (–17.4 versus –12.7). The response rate as indicated by a CGI improvement score <3 was significantly greater with extended-release venlafaxine than placebo (69% versus 48%). Common adverse events were asthenia, anorexia, pain, and somnolence. Statistically significant changes in height, weight, blood pressure, pulse, and cholesterol levels were observed in the extended-release venlafaxine group. CONCLUSIONS: Extended-release venlafaxine may be an effective, well-tolerated short-term treatment for pediatric generalized anxiety disorder.




Related Article:


In This Issue
Am J Psychiatry 2007 164: 50. [Full Text]
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

March 2nd, 2007, 12:29 pm #8


<STRONG><FONT size=4>You can see this Setraline/Zoloft/Lustral study was independent of the industry (Pfizer) making the drug (...er....</FONT></STRONG><STRONG><FONT size=4>NOT!).&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Probably you'll find the same about the effexor study.</FONT></STRONG>

<STRONG><FONT size=4>http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/abs/10 ... 006.16.103</FONT></STRONG>

<STRONG><FONT size=4>Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Long-Term Sertraline Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder
</FONT></STRONG>Mar 2006, Vol. 16, No. 1-2 : 103 -116

<STRONG>Moira Rynn, M.D. </STRONG>
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

<STRONG><FONT size=4>Karen Dineen Wagner, M.D., Ph.D.&nbsp;</FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;&nbsp;<STRONG><EM> [NB: TEENSCREEN CHILD PREDATOR]
</EM></STRONG>University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.

Craig Donnelly, M.D.
Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire.

Paul Ambrosini, M.D.
Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Christopher J. Wohlberg, M.D.,Ph.D.
<STRONG><FONT size=5>Pfizer, Inc</FONT></STRONG>., New York, New York.

Phyllis Landau, M.D.
<STRONG><FONT size=5>Pfizer, Inc</FONT></STRONG>., New York, New York.

Ruoyong Yang, Ph.D.
<STRONG><FONT size=5>Pfizer, Inc</FONT></STRONG>., New York, New York.

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the long-term safety, tolerability, and efficacy of sertraline 50–200 mg once-daily in children (6–11 year olds) and adolescents (12–18 year olds) with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV) diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD)

Methods: This study consisted of a 24-week open-label observational study of children and adolescents who had completed either of two 10-week double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. The Children's Depression Rating Scale—Revised (CDRS-R) was the primary measure of efficacy.

Results: Two hundred ninety nine (299) patients completed the acute studies and were eligible for the extension study. Of these, 226 enrolled, but 5 did not receive treatment. Of 221 patients (107 children and 114 adolescents), 62.4% completed the study. The endpoint mean daily dose was 109.9 mg/day. The mean decrease in CDRS-R score from double-blind baseline was 34.8 points (p < 0.001), with patients showing continued improvement in CDRS-R scores regardless of which treatment they received in the double-blind studies. At endpoint, 86% of patients met CDRS-R responder and 58% CDRS-R remitter criteria.

Conclusions: <STRONG>Sertraline appears to be well tolerated and safe over 24 weeks of treatment in children and adolescents with MDD</STRONG>. Children and adolescents treated with sertraline appear to have increased improvement over that seen in the first 10 weeks of treatment. These findings need confirmation in placebo-controlled studies. "

&nbsp;

&nbsp;

<STRONG><FONT size=5>Moira Rynn is an industry MD with INDUSTRY (and her own) interests put first and any studies done on that basis are NOT based on SCIENCE.&nbsp;</FONT></STRONG>

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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

March 2nd, 2007, 1:21 pm #9


<STRONG><FONT size=4>Bad science, not true science at all, when data is manipulated, not included, or hidden.&nbsp; Rynn and co are scientific frauds.</FONT></STRONG>

&nbsp;

http://ahrp.blogspot.com/search/label/SSRI%20Suicide

"...Pfizer's data from the pediatric Zoloft trials shows that "aggression was the joint commonest cause for discontinuation from the two sertraline placebo-controlled trials in depressed children. In these trials, eight of 189 patients randomised to sertraline discontinued for aggression, agitation, or hyperkinesis (a coding term for akathisia), compared with no dropouts for these reasons in 184 patients on placebo (95% Confidence Interval, 1.72-infinity). There were 15 discontinuations on Zoloft compared with two on placebo in any treatment induced manifestation of activation (i.e., suicidal ideation or attempts, aggression, agitation, hyperkinesis, or aggravated depression), a relative risk of 7.3 (95% CI, 1.70-31.5; p = 0.0015). <FONT size=5><STRONG>The published report failed to include this data in the analysis. [7] </STRONG></FONT><FONT size=3>..."</FONT>

<FONT size=3></FONT>&nbsp;

<FONT size=3>"...<STRONG><FONT size=5>7</FONT>.&nbsp; Wagner KD, Ambrosini P, <FONT size=5>Rynn M</FONT>, Wohlberg C, Yang R, et al. (2003) Efficacy of sertraline in the treatment of children and adolescents with major depressive disorder: Two randomized controlled trials. JAMA 290: 1033-1041..."</STRONG>


&nbsp;

&nbsp;

<STRONG>Not Scientists, just Key Opinion Leaders,&nbsp;Scientific Frauds&nbsp;and...</STRONG>

<STRONG>CHILD PREDATORS.</STRONG>
</FONT>
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

March 2nd, 2007, 1:24 pm #10

<STRONG><FONT size=4>You can see this Setraline/Zoloft/Lustral study was independent of the industry (Pfizer) making the drug (...er....</FONT></STRONG><STRONG><FONT size=4>NOT!).&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Probably you'll find the same about the effexor study.</FONT></STRONG>

<STRONG><FONT size=4>http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/abs/10 ... 006.16.103</FONT></STRONG>

<STRONG><FONT size=4>Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Long-Term Sertraline Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder
</FONT></STRONG>Mar 2006, Vol. 16, No. 1-2 : 103 -116

<STRONG>Moira Rynn, M.D. </STRONG>
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

<STRONG><FONT size=4>Karen Dineen Wagner, M.D., Ph.D.&nbsp;</FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;&nbsp;<STRONG><EM> [NB: TEENSCREEN CHILD PREDATOR]
</EM></STRONG>University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas.

Craig Donnelly, M.D.
Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire.

Paul Ambrosini, M.D.
Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Christopher J. Wohlberg, M.D.,Ph.D.
<STRONG><FONT size=5>Pfizer, Inc</FONT></STRONG>., New York, New York.

Phyllis Landau, M.D.
<STRONG><FONT size=5>Pfizer, Inc</FONT></STRONG>., New York, New York.

Ruoyong Yang, Ph.D.
<STRONG><FONT size=5>Pfizer, Inc</FONT></STRONG>., New York, New York.

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the long-term safety, tolerability, and efficacy of sertraline 50–200 mg once-daily in children (6–11 year olds) and adolescents (12–18 year olds) with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV) diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD)

Methods: This study consisted of a 24-week open-label observational study of children and adolescents who had completed either of two 10-week double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. The Children's Depression Rating Scale—Revised (CDRS-R) was the primary measure of efficacy.

Results: Two hundred ninety nine (299) patients completed the acute studies and were eligible for the extension study. Of these, 226 enrolled, but 5 did not receive treatment. Of 221 patients (107 children and 114 adolescents), 62.4% completed the study. The endpoint mean daily dose was 109.9 mg/day. The mean decrease in CDRS-R score from double-blind baseline was 34.8 points (p < 0.001), with patients showing continued improvement in CDRS-R scores regardless of which treatment they received in the double-blind studies. At endpoint, 86% of patients met CDRS-R responder and 58% CDRS-R remitter criteria.

Conclusions: <STRONG>Sertraline appears to be well tolerated and safe over 24 weeks of treatment in children and adolescents with MDD</STRONG>. Children and adolescents treated with sertraline appear to have increased improvement over that seen in the first 10 weeks of treatment. These findings need confirmation in placebo-controlled studies. "

&nbsp;

&nbsp;

<STRONG><FONT size=5>Moira Rynn is an industry MD with INDUSTRY (and her own) interests put first and any studies done on that basis are NOT based on SCIENCE.&nbsp;</FONT></STRONG>
<A class=l onmousedown="return clk(this.href,'','','res','3','')" href="http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/con ... 290"><FONT color=#551a8b><FONT size=5>Efficacy and Safety of Extended-Release Venlafaxine in the ...</FONT></FONT></A>
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<FONT size=5>Moira A. Rynn, M.D. , Mark A. Riddle, M.D. , Paul P. Yeung, M.D., M.P.H. and Nadia R. Kunz, ... Drs. <STRONG>Yeung</STRONG> and <STRONG>Kunz are</STRONG> <STRONG>employed by Wyeth</STRONG> Pharmaceuticals. ...
<SPAN class=a><FONT color=#008000>ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/164/2/290 - </FONT></SPAN><NOBR><A class=fl href="http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&rls= ... 290"><FONT color=#7777cc>Similar pages</FONT></A></NOBR></FONT>

<FONT size=5><NOBR></NOBR></FONT>&nbsp;

<FONT size=5><NOBR>Doesn't show in the abstract, but it must be in the full text.</NOBR></FONT>
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