NOVEMBER 2006: News on SSRIs, other Psych Drugs and Related Issues

NOVEMBER 2006: News on SSRIs, other Psych Drugs and Related Issues

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 16th, 2006, 7:05 pm #1


 
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 16th, 2006, 7:06 pm #2

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<DIV><STRONG></STRONG>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><STRONG>http://www.24-7pressrelease.com/view_press_release.php?rID=20858&tf7sid=55249c93542211e5d1e1e52fc58028da</STRONG></DIV>
<DIV><STRONG></STRONG>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><STRONG>An immense number of patients get worse from new antidepressant drugs, says Vice President of The Swedish Psychiatric Association</STRONG></DIV>
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<TD class=releasesubtitle><EM>Speaking on antidepressants the Vice President of The Swedish Psychiatric Association, Dr. Christina Spjut, said Sunday that "an immense number of persons get worse from this". She said that many persons take these drugs for years "where the antidepressant drugs make them continue to be depressed".</EM>
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<TD class=releasetext vAlign=top>/24-7PressRelease/ - HAGERSTEN, SWEDEN, November 16, 2006 - This announcement on Swedish national television, coming from one of the top psychiatric authorities in the country, is sensational.

Millions and millions of persons take new antidepressant drugs - in the belief that they are "safe and effective" - as psychiatrists, pharmaceutical companies and medical agencies, like the FDA, have told them.

But now a top psychiatric authority tells them that they in an immense number of cases "get worse from this" and that the antidepressant drugs themselves in many cases "make them continue to be depressed". The VP of The Swedish Psychiatric Association - the national member organisation of the World Federation of Mental Health - further said about the harmful effects of antidepressant drugs and the fact that doctors don't believe what the patients tell them, that there is "a considerable lack of knowledge about these side effects" and that the patients must tell their doctors "that this exists, and then this doctor has to find out about it".

It is a little known fact that pharmaceutical companies have had to work hard to show any positive effect of new antidepressants (<STRONG>SSRIs and SNRIs</STRONG>) to get approval of the drugs. Even if they are experts in asking the right questions and getting the answers they want from their clinical trials, it has been almost impossible to complete two studies where the drug is more "effective" than placebo (which is the requirement for approval of the drug from a medical agency, like the FDA). From deep within the archives of clinical trials the hidden harmful effects of antidepressant drugs have emerged the last two years. But the fact that these drugs cause suicidality and violence is not what psychiatrists and pharmaceutical companies have told the public.

Instead the public and doctors have for many years heard that these drugs are "safe and effective" and if some bad effect showed up it was explained away with the "underlying disease". The problem was said to be compliance - the patients had to continue to take the drugs long enough for the depression to go away.

But the Vice President of The Swedish Psychiatric Association has now announced that this was false: For many persons "the antidepressant drugs make them continue to be depressed".

Patients should repeat the words of this psychiatric authority when speaking to their doctors: Tell the doctors about the harmful effects of antidepressants, "that this exists, and then this doctor has to find out about it". They should tell the doctors that the cause of their bad feelings very likely is that "the antidepressant drugs make them continue to be depressed". They should get their doctors to gradually reduce the antidepressant drug under careful supervision.

Patients should also be aware of the new deceitful campaign of biological psychiatry. As with all earlier psychiatric drugs the catastrophic effects can be announced first when a campaign for a new drug or drug cocktail is about to start. The coming campaign, (well-known for the VP Dr. Spjut), in Sweden and the rest of the Western world is the <STRONG>sale of "Bipolar Disorder" (Manic-Depression)</STRONG>. Patients are to be told their "old" diagnosis of depression was a bit wrong and that the "correct" diagnosis was "Bipolar" (both these diagnoses are of course completely subjective, there is no objective confirmable evidence for any form of "chemical imbalance" in the brain). And then <STRONG>the treating doctor is supposed to add even more toxic substances </STRONG>- antipsychotic drugs like Zyprexa and Risperdal - to the antidepressants.

The antidepressant era is about to end - it should be replaced by real solutions to personal problems, not by more false diagnoses and more toxic psychiatric drugs.


Janne Larsson
writer from Sweden - investigating psychiatry </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>[url=mailto:janne.olov.larsson@telia.com]janne.olov.larsson@telia.com[/url]</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

November 17th, 2006, 6:44 pm #3

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<SPAN name="Konabody"><FONT size=2>&nbsp;</FONT>
<FONT size=3>http://society.guardian.co.uk/qa/story/ ... html</FONT>
<FONT size=5>The mental health bill</FONT>
<FONT size=3><FONT face=arial,helvetica,sans-serif>The government has published yet another bill intended to replace the Mental Health Act. But campaigners say it is still too draconian. David Batty explains </FONT>

</FONT><FONT face=Geneva,Arial,sans-serif><FONT size=3>Friday November 17, 2006
</FONT><FONT color=#333366 size=3>SocietyGuardian.co.uk</FONT><FONT size=3>
</FONT></FONT>
<DIV id=GuardianArticleBody>What is this bill?
The bill is the government's third attempt in eight years to reform the 1983 Mental Health Act. The government first published proposals to reform the act in 1999. A draft bill followed in 2002 but was strongly opposed by mental health campaigners and psychiatrists. A second draft bill was published in 2004, but this was again widely opposed. After the second draft bill was heavily criticised by a parliamentary committee, the government abandoned it in March this year but announced its intention to press ahead with the most controversial aspects of the draft mental health bill in shorter, streamlined legislation. <STRONG>A third bill was published after the Queen's speech in November 2006</STRONG>.
<!-- This site/section combo is not set up to show MPU's -->What does the new bill consist of?
It retains the draft bill's proposal to remove a legal loophole that allows people with severe personality disorders, previously known as psychopaths, to avoid treatment by arguing they get no benefit from it. <STRONG>Psychiatrists oppose this measure, arguing it will turn them into jailers</STRONG>. Measures to extend the <STRONG>use of compulsory treatment outside hospital </STRONG>to patients in the community also remain. These will allow restrictions such as curfews to be imposed on patients in the community. Mental health charities and the Royal College of Psychiatrists fear this may dissuade people with mental health problems from seeking help.
Why do ministers want to remove the treatability clause?
Ministers' plans to detain people with personality disorders who have not committed a crime were first announced after the murder of Lin Russell and her six-year-old daughter Megan in Kent in 1996. Their killer, Michael Stone, had been left free to commit the crime because his severe personality disorder was considered untreatable and he could not be detained under the Mental Health Act. The <STRONG>government estimated there were up to 2,400 similar people in the UK</STRONG>, described as having dangerous and severe personality disorders, of whom it estimated between 300 and 600 lived in the community rather than prison or secure mental hospitals. <STRONG>However, the vice-president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCPsych), Dr Tony Zigmond, believes there are as few as a dozen such people in the community</STRONG>.
What else will the bill do?
The Department of Health says the bill will close a legal loophole that means <STRONG>thousands of people with learning disabilities or dementia may be kept indefinitely in hospitals </STRONG>and nursing homes because they are unable to communicate their wishes. The health secretary and Welsh ministers will also be able to reduce the time before a patient undergoing compulsory treatment has their case reviewed by a mental health tribunal. The bill retains the plan to give patients the right to choose their own representative, <STRONG>who currently must be their nearest relative</STRONG>. This representative will be able to apply for a patient to be discharged from hospital or to trigger an assessment of their case.
Why does the government want to extend compulsory treatment?
The government says allowing the compulsory treatment of patients in the community will help those caught in a "revolving door" of relapse and readmission because they fail to take their medication. Ministers claim the shorter bill will limit these extended powers, so that only patients assessed in hospital can be forcibly treated in the community. <STRONG>But Dr Zigmond says this could still cover patients whose assessments were carried out years ago</STRONG>.
What do mental health campaigners think?
<STRONG>The Mental Health Alliance, a group of 78 organisations including the Law Society, the RCPsych and the charities Mind, Sane and Rethink, is opposed to the latest version of the bill. It is staging a lobby of Parliament on November 28 to protest against the proposed legislation</STRONG>."
</DIV></SPAN>
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

November 17th, 2006, 7:03 pm #4

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<SPAN name="Konabody"><FONT size=2>http://society.guardian.co.uk/health/st ... html</FONT>


<FONT size=2>Sarah Boseley, health editor
Tuesday November 14, 2006
The Guardian




The <STRONG>White House is lobbying British ministers to allow the world's main drug companies unrestricted access to the NHS </STRONG>as part of a package of free market reforms for the service. </FONT></SPAN>

<SPAN name="Konabody"><FONT size=2>The <STRONG>US government is positioning itself behind the giant pharmaceutical firms, predominantly based in America</STRONG>, which have been piling pressure on the body that approves drugs for use in hospitals and for prescription by GPs.</FONT></SPAN>
<SPAN name="Konabody"><FONT size=2>

The <STRONG>drug companies claim that they are being held back by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence </STRONG>and have separately lobbied for it to be reformed.

In a surprising intervention, the US deputy health secretary, Alex Azar, forced the issue in London <STRONG>yesterday</STRONG>, ahead of talks with officials following a trip to the US last week by the health secretary, Patricia Hewitt. He said attempts to use rationing mechanisms such as Nice to cut soaring drugs bills would stifle<STRONG> innovation <EM>[! is that what they call toxic drugs!]</EM></STRONG><EM>- </EM>an argument that is <STRONG>constantly </STRONG>made by the pharmaceutical industry.

Allowing <STRONG>all </STRONG>new drugs to be used in the NHS would result in the companies "fighting it out" on price, Mr Azar said, which would drive the drug bill down.

He made it clear that he was also in favour of the drug companies being allowed to <STRONG>advertise directly to patients</STRONG>. At the moment they may only advertise to doctors.

He also wanted to share the US experience of offering private insurance packages to people on Medicare - the healthcare scheme provided by the government to the poor and elderly. It might be possible for the UK government to consider something similar, he suggested, so that everyone could choose either a basic healthcare deal or top it up themselves if they wanted to pay for more than the state could afford.

Speaking to the Guardian, Mr Azar said healthcare systems in all wealthy countries were expensive, and costs were increasing at a time when budget constraints were getting more real as the population aged. "On the other side we have to focus on long-term innovation," he said. "How are we making sure that we don't take steps on cost containment that are short-sighted and prevent the investment in long-term biomedical research and development and innovation, so that when my kids are senior citizens we have the next generation and next, next, next generation of drugs?"

The <STRONG>White House arguments will increase the mounting pressure on Nice</STRONG>, which is regularly castigated by patient groups and drug companies when it rejects a new medicine from use in the NHS on cost grounds.

Recently there was an outcry over its ruling that new drugs for <STRONG>Alzheimers </STRONG>should be given only to those with moderate disease, and yesterday cancer charities objected to its preliminary ruling that a new drug, Tarceva, for lung cancer, should not be used in the NHS. Ministers have been directly <STRONG>lobbied by drug companies </STRONG>arguing that its decisions are ill-founded and inappropriate.

Yesterday Mr Azar emphasised the close contact his office has with the Department of Health and with European ministries. The links had been particularly useful in dealing with pandemic influenza preparedness, he said.

He said he had "some great discussions" with Ms Hewitt in the US last week and had followed them up with her officials and the Treasury.

"In all of our systems it is so easy to make the decision to cut costs today by going after drug prices, and to not focus on what will be the impact on long-term innovation," he said.

"I try to remember to advise people first off that we will never balance our budget going after drug prices. They are a relatively small proportion of the entire healthcare budget in our system."

Drugs and devices could keep people out of hospital and allow them to be cared for in their own homes, so saving costs, he said"

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Maybe NICE should point out the unusually high level of risks (considering&nbsp;its hardly been on the market)&nbsp; of serious side effects of the alzheimer's drug - instead of saying its because of the cash?&nbsp; Maybe then people will understand that the drugs aren't safe?

Check October's thread and you'll see how DEADLY those side effects have ALREADY proven to be, but...

...I&nbsp;suppose we musn't upset&nbsp;Pfizer Klaus&nbsp;or&nbsp;he won't leave a present under the government tree (in fact he'll avoid the UK altogether apparently, according to recent threats).</FONT></SPAN>
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

November 17th, 2006, 7:24 pm #5

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<TD colSpan=3><FONT face="Arial, Times New Roman, Verdana, Helvetica" size=2><SPAN name="Konabody"><SPAN name="Konabody"><FONT size=2>&nbsp;So are those 'support groups'&nbsp;et al, AND THE WHITE HOUSE, while pushing for drug companies actually&nbsp;trying to kill UK grandmamas or grandpapas for pharma incentives? Or do they just not bother to research?</FONT>
EBIXA is ALSO known as NAMENDA:

FREQUENT side effects ALREADY are listed as "<STRONG>Cardiac Failure" (Death), "Cerebrovascular Accidents and Transient Ischemic Attacks" (Strokes)</STRONG>, "<STRONG>Pneumonia" (which&nbsp;often kills&nbsp;vulnerable elderly) </STRONG>&nbsp;- and re behavioural problems experienced by people with Alzheimers?&nbsp; "<STRONG>AGGRESSIVE REACTION</STRONG>" (ie <STRONG>AGGRESSION</STRONG>).&nbsp; All are listed under "<STRONG>FREQUENT".</STRONG>

http://www.rxlist.com/cgi/generic3/namenda_ad.htm

"...Body as a Whole: Frequent: syncope. Infrequent: hypothermia, [url=javascript:defwindow(]allergic[/url] reaction.

Cardiovascular System: <FONT size=5><STRONG>Frequent: cardiac failure</STRONG></FONT>. Infrequent: [url=javascript:defwindow(]angina[/url] pectoris, bradycardia, [url=javascript:defwindow(]myocardial[/url] infarction, thrombophlebitis, atrial fibrillation, hypotension, [url=javascript:defwindow(]cardiac[/url] arrest, [url=javascript:defwindow(]postural[/url] hypotension, [url=javascript:defwindow(]pulmonary[/url] embolism, [url=javascript:defwindow(]pulmonary[/url] edema.

<STRONG>Central and Peripheral Nervous System: <FONT size=5>Frequent: </FONT></STRONG>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>transient</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> ischemic attack, </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>cerebrovascular</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> accident,</STRONG></FONT> vertigo, ataxia, hypokinesia. Infrequent: paresthesia, <STRONG>convulsions,</STRONG> [url=javascript:defwindow(]extrapyramidal[/url] disorder, hypertonia, tremor, aphasia, hypoesthesia, [url=javascript:defwindow(]abnormal[/url] coordination, hemiplegia, hyperkinesia, [url=javascript:defwindow(]involuntary[/url] muscle contractions, <STRONG>stupor,</STRONG> <STRONG>cerebral hemorrhage</STRONG>, neuralgia, ptosis, neuropathy.

Gastrointestinal System: Infrequent: gastroenteritis, diverticulitis, [url=javascript:defwindow(]gastrointestinal[/url] hemorrhage, melena, [url=javascript:defwindow(]esophageal[/url] ulceration.

<STRONG>Hemic and Lymphatic Disorders:<FONT size=5>Frequent: anemia</FONT></STRONG>. Infrequent: leukopenia.

Metabolic and Nutritional Disorders: Frequent: increased alkaline phosphatase, decreased weight. Infrequent: dehydration, hyponatremia, <STRONG>aggravated </STRONG>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<STRONG>diabetes</STRONG>[/url]<STRONG> mellitus. </STRONG>

<FONT size=5>Psychiatric Disorders: Frequent: aggressive reaction</FONT>. Infrequent: <STRONG>delusio</STRONG>n, [url=javascript:defwindow(]<STRONG>personality</STRONG>[/url]<STRONG> disorder</STRONG>, <STRONG>emotional lability</STRONG>, nervousness, [url=javascript:defwindow(]sleep[/url] disorder, [url=javascript:defwindow(]libido[/url] increased, <STRONG>psychosis, amnesia</STRONG>, apathy, [url=javascript:defwindow(]<STRONG>paranoid</STRONG>[/url]<STRONG> reaction</STRONG>, [url=javascript:defwindow(]<STRONG>thinking</STRONG>[/url]<STRONG> abnormal</STRONG>, crying abnormal, [url=javascript:defwindow(]appetite[/url] increased, paroniria, <STRONG>delirium</STRONG>, depersonalization, neurosis, [url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>suicide</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> attempt. </STRONG></FONT>

<FONT size=5>Respiratory System: <STRONG>Frequent: pneumonia</STRONG></FONT><STRONG>.</STRONG> Infrequent: apnea, asthma, hemoptysis.

Skin and Appendages: Frequent: rash. Infrequent: skin ulceration, pruritus, cellulitis, eczema, dermatitis, erythematous rash, alopecia, urticaria.

<STRONG>Special Senses:</STRONG><FONT size=5> <STRONG>Frequent: cataract, conjunctivitis</STRONG></FONT>. Infrequent: [url=javascript:defwindow(]macula[/url] lutea degeneration, decreased [url=javascript:defwindow(]visual[/url] acuity, decreased hearing, tinnitus, blepharitis, blurred vision, corneal opacity, glaucoma, conjunctival hemorrhage, [url=javascript:defwindow(]eye[/url] pain, [url=javascript:defwindow(]retinal[/url] hemorrhage, xerophthalmia, diplopia, [url=javascript:defwindow(]abnormal[/url] lacrimation, myopia, [url=javascript:defwindow(]retinal[/url] detachment.

Urinary System: Frequent: frequent micturition. Infrequent: dysuria, hematuria, [url=javascript:defwindow(]urinary[/url] retention.

Events Reported Subsequent to the Marketing of Namenda Worldwide

The following adverse events of possible importance for which there is inadequate data to determine the causal relationship to memantine [url=javascript:defwindow(]treatment[/url] have been reported to be temporally associated with memantine [url=javascript:defwindow(]treatment[/url] and are not described elsewhere in labeling: [url=javascript:defwindow(]atrioventricular[/url] block, [url=javascript:defwindow(]bone[/url] fracture, [url=javascript:defwindow(]carpal[/url] [url=javascript:defwindow(]tunnel[/url] syndrome, <STRONG>cerebral infarction</STRONG>, [url=javascript:defwindow(]chest[/url] pain, claudication, colitis, dyskinesia, dysphagia, gastritis, [url=javascript:defwindow(]gastroesophageal[/url] reflux, <STRONG>grand </STRONG>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<STRONG>mal</STRONG>[/url]<STRONG> convulsions</STRONG>, [url=javascript:defwindow(]<STRONG>intracranial</STRONG>[/url]<STRONG> hemorrhage</STRONG>, [url=javascript:defwindow(]hepatic[/url] failure, hyperlipidemia, hypoglycemia, ileus, impotence, malaise, neuroleptic [url=javascript:defwindow(]malignant[/url] syndrome, [url=javascript:defwindow(]acute[/url] pancreatitis, [url=javascript:defwindow(]aspiration[/url] pneumonia, [url=javascript:defwindow(]acute[/url] [url=javascript:defwindow(]renal[/url] failure, prolonged QT interval, restlessness, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, <STRONG><FONT size=5>sudden death</FONT></STRONG>, [url=javascript:defwindow(]supraventricular[/url] tachycardia, tachycardia, [url=javascript:defwindow(]tardive[/url] dyskinesia, and thrombocytopenia.

ANIMAL TOXICOLOGY

<STRONG><FONT size=5>Memantine </FONT></STRONG>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<STRONG><FONT size=5>induced</FONT></STRONG>[/url]<STRONG><FONT size=5> neuronal lesions (vacuolation and necrosis) in the multipolar and </FONT></STRONG>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<STRONG><FONT size=5>pyramidal</FONT></STRONG>[/url]<STRONG><FONT size=5> cells in </FONT></STRONG>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<STRONG><FONT size=5>cortical</FONT></STRONG>[/url]<STRONG><FONT size=5> layers III and </FONT></STRONG>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<STRONG><FONT size=5>IV</FONT></STRONG>[/url]<STRONG><FONT size=5> of the </FONT></STRONG>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<STRONG><FONT size=5>posterior</FONT></STRONG>[/url]<STRONG><FONT size=5> cingulate and retrosplenial neocortices in rats, similar to those which are known to occur in rodents administered other NMDA </FONT></STRONG>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<STRONG><FONT size=5>receptor</FONT></STRONG>[/url]<STRONG><FONT size=5> antagonists. Lesions were seen after a single </FONT></STRONG>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<STRONG><FONT size=5>dose</FONT></STRONG>[/url]<STRONG><FONT size=5> of memantine</FONT></STRONG>. [url=javascript:defwindow(]In[/url] a study in which rats were given daily [url=javascript:defwindow(]oral[/url] doses of memantine for 14 days, the no-effect [url=javascript:defwindow(]dose[/url] for neuronal [url=javascript:defwindow(]necrosis[/url] was 6 times the [url=javascript:defwindow(]maximum[/url] recommended [url=javascript:defwindow(]human[/url] [url=javascript:defwindow(]dose[/url] on a mg/m2 basis. The potential for [url=javascript:defwindow(]induction[/url] of [url=javascript:defwindow(]central[/url] neuronal [url=javascript:defwindow(]vacuolation[/url] and [url=javascript:defwindow(]necrosis[/url] by NMDA receptor antagonists in humans is unknown.

DRUG ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE

Controlled Substance Class: Memantine HCl is not a controlled substance.

Physical and Psychological Dependence: Memantine HCl is a low to moderate [url=javascript:defwindow(]affinity[/url] uncompetitive NMDA [url=javascript:defwindow(]antagonist[/url] that did not produce any [url=javascript:defwindow(]evidence[/url] of drug-seeking [url=javascript:defwindow(]behavior[/url] or [url=javascript:defwindow(]withdrawal[/url] symptoms upon discontinuation in 2,504 patients who participated in [url=javascript:defwindow(]clinical[/url] trials at [url=javascript:defwindow(]therapeutic[/url] doses. Post marketing data, outside the U.S., retrospectively collected, has provided no [url=javascript:defwindow(]evidence[/url] of drug [url=javascript:defwindow(]abuse[/url] or dependence.

<A name=DI></A><FONT size=+1>DRUG INTERACTIONS</FONT>
Drug-Drug Interactions

N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists: The combined use of Namenda with other NMDA antagonists (amantadine, ketamine, and dextromethorphan) has not been systematically evaluated and such use should be approached with caution.

Effects of Namenda on substrates of microsomal enzymes: In vitro studies conducted with [url=javascript:defwindow(]marker[/url] substrates of CYP450 enzymes (CYP1A2, -2A6, -2C9, -2D6, -2E1, -3A4) showed [url=javascript:defwindow(]minimal[/url] [url=javascript:defwindow(]inhibition[/url] of these enzymes by memantine. [url=javascript:defwindow(]In[/url] addition, in vitro studies indicate that at concentrations exceeding those associated with efficacy, memantine does not induce the cytochrome P450 isozymes CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2E1 and CYP3A4/5. No pharmacokinetic interactions with drugs metabolized by these enzymes are expected.

Effects of inhibitors and/or substrates of microsomal enzymes on Namenda: Memantine is predominantly <STRONG>renally eliminated</STRONG>, and drugs that are substrates and/or inhibitors of the CYP450 [url=javascript:defwindow(]system[/url] are <FONT size=5><STRONG>not</STRONG> <STRONG>expected</STRONG> </FONT>to alter the [url=javascript:defwindow(]metabolism[/url] of memantine.

Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors: Coadministration of Namenda with the [url=javascript:defwindow(]AChE[/url] [url=javascript:defwindow(]inhibitor[/url] donepezil HCl did not [url=javascript:defwindow(]affect[/url] the [url=javascript:defwindow(]pharmacokinetics[/url] of either compound. [url=javascript:defwindow(]In[/url] a 24-week controlled [url=javascript:defwindow(]clinical[/url] study in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer’s disease, the adverse event [url=javascript:defwindow(]profile[/url] observed with a combination of memantine and donepezil was similar to that of donepezil alone.

Drugs eliminated [url=javascript:defwindow(]via[/url] [url=javascript:defwindow(]renal[/url] mechanisms: Because memantine is eliminated in part by [url=javascript:defwindow(]tubular[/url] secretion, [url=javascript:defwindow(]coadministration[/url] of drugs that use the same renal cationic system, including [url=javascript:defwindow(]hydrochlorothiazide[/url] (HCTZ), [url=javascript:defwindow(]triamterene[/url] (TA), metformin, cimetidine, ranitidine, quinidine, and nicotine, could potentially result in altered [url=javascript:defwindow(]plasma[/url] levels of both agents. However, [url=javascript:defwindow(]coadministration[/url] of Namenda and HCTZ/TA did not [url=javascript:defwindow(]affect[/url] the [url=javascript:defwindow(]bioavailability[/url] of either memantine or TA, and the [url=javascript:defwindow(]bioavailability[/url] of HCTZ decreased by 20%. [url=javascript:defwindow(]In[/url] addition, [url=javascript:defwindow(]coadministration[/url] of memantine with the antihyperglycemic [url=javascript:defwindow(]drug[/url] Glucovance<FONT face=symbol>Ò</FONT> (glyburide and [url=javascript:defwindow(]metformin[/url] HCl) did not [url=javascript:defwindow(]affect[/url] the [url=javascript:defwindow(]pharmacokinetics[/url] of memantine, [url=javascript:defwindow(]metformin[/url] and glyburide. Furthermore, memantine did not modify the [url=javascript:defwindow(]serum[/url] glucose lowering [url=javascript:defwindow(]effect[/url] of Glucovance<FONT face=symbol>Ò</FONT>.

Drugs that make the [url=javascript:defwindow(]urine[/url] alkaline: The [url=javascript:defwindow(]clearance[/url] of memantine was reduced by about 80% under [url=javascript:defwindow(]alkaline[/url] [url=javascript:defwindow(]urine[/url] conditions at [url=javascript:defwindow(]pH[/url] 8. <FONT size=5><STRONG>Therefore, alterations of </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>urine</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>pH</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> towards the </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>alkaline</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>condition</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> may </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>lead</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> to an accumulation of the </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>drug</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> with a possible increase in adverse effects. Urine </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>pH</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> is altered by diet, drugs (e.g. </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>carbonic</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>anhydrase</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> inhibitors, </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>sodium</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> bicarbonate) and </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>clinical</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>state</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> of the </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>patient</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> (e.g. </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>renal</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>tubular</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>acidosis</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> or severe infections of the </STRONG></FONT>[url=javascript:defwindow(]<FONT size=5><STRONG>urinary</STRONG></FONT>[/url]<FONT size=5><STRONG> tract). </STRONG></FONT>Hence, memantine should be used with caution under these conditions.
<!-- #EndEditable --></SPAN></SPAN></FONT></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

November 17th, 2006, 7:56 pm #6

<SPAN name="Konabody"><FONT size=2>http://society.guardian.co.uk/health/st ... html</FONT>


<FONT size=2>Sarah Boseley, health editor
Tuesday November 14, 2006
The Guardian




The <STRONG>White House is lobbying British ministers to allow the world's main drug companies unrestricted access to the NHS </STRONG>as part of a package of free market reforms for the service. </FONT></SPAN>

<SPAN name="Konabody"><FONT size=2>The <STRONG>US government is positioning itself behind the giant pharmaceutical firms, predominantly based in America</STRONG>, which have been piling pressure on the body that approves drugs for use in hospitals and for prescription by GPs.</FONT></SPAN>
<SPAN name="Konabody"><FONT size=2>

The <STRONG>drug companies claim that they are being held back by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence </STRONG>and have separately lobbied for it to be reformed.

In a surprising intervention, the US deputy health secretary, Alex Azar, forced the issue in London <STRONG>yesterday</STRONG>, ahead of talks with officials following a trip to the US last week by the health secretary, Patricia Hewitt. He said attempts to use rationing mechanisms such as Nice to cut soaring drugs bills would stifle<STRONG> innovation <EM>[! is that what they call toxic drugs!]</EM></STRONG><EM>- </EM>an argument that is <STRONG>constantly </STRONG>made by the pharmaceutical industry.

Allowing <STRONG>all </STRONG>new drugs to be used in the NHS would result in the companies "fighting it out" on price, Mr Azar said, which would drive the drug bill down.

He made it clear that he was also in favour of the drug companies being allowed to <STRONG>advertise directly to patients</STRONG>. At the moment they may only advertise to doctors.

He also wanted to share the US experience of offering private insurance packages to people on Medicare - the healthcare scheme provided by the government to the poor and elderly. It might be possible for the UK government to consider something similar, he suggested, so that everyone could choose either a basic healthcare deal or top it up themselves if they wanted to pay for more than the state could afford.

Speaking to the Guardian, Mr Azar said healthcare systems in all wealthy countries were expensive, and costs were increasing at a time when budget constraints were getting more real as the population aged. "On the other side we have to focus on long-term innovation," he said. "How are we making sure that we don't take steps on cost containment that are short-sighted and prevent the investment in long-term biomedical research and development and innovation, so that when my kids are senior citizens we have the next generation and next, next, next generation of drugs?"

The <STRONG>White House arguments will increase the mounting pressure on Nice</STRONG>, which is regularly castigated by patient groups and drug companies when it rejects a new medicine from use in the NHS on cost grounds.

Recently there was an outcry over its ruling that new drugs for <STRONG>Alzheimers </STRONG>should be given only to those with moderate disease, and yesterday cancer charities objected to its preliminary ruling that a new drug, Tarceva, for lung cancer, should not be used in the NHS. Ministers have been directly <STRONG>lobbied by drug companies </STRONG>arguing that its decisions are ill-founded and inappropriate.

Yesterday Mr Azar emphasised the close contact his office has with the Department of Health and with European ministries. The links had been particularly useful in dealing with pandemic influenza preparedness, he said.

He said he had "some great discussions" with Ms Hewitt in the US last week and had followed them up with her officials and the Treasury.

"In all of our systems it is so easy to make the decision to cut costs today by going after drug prices, and to not focus on what will be the impact on long-term innovation," he said.

"I try to remember to advise people first off that we will never balance our budget going after drug prices. They are a relatively small proportion of the entire healthcare budget in our system."

Drugs and devices could keep people out of hospital and allow them to be cared for in their own homes, so saving costs, he said"

&nbsp;

&nbsp;

&nbsp;

Maybe NICE should point out the unusually high level of risks (considering&nbsp;its hardly been on the market)&nbsp; of serious side effects of the alzheimer's drug - instead of saying its because of the cash?&nbsp; Maybe then people will understand that the drugs aren't safe?

Check October's thread and you'll see how DEADLY those side effects have ALREADY proven to be, but...

...I&nbsp;suppose we musn't upset&nbsp;Pfizer Klaus&nbsp;or&nbsp;he won't leave a present under the government tree (in fact he'll avoid the UK altogether apparently, according to recent threats).</FONT></SPAN>
It could only happen in America.&nbsp; Couldn't it?

The answer it seems is NO.&nbsp; The <STRONG>White House </STRONG>are now lobbying the UK for more freedom for <STRONG>Big Pharma to push drugs on you and YOUR children</STRONG> - by direct advertising to people (just like in the US, and look what it did for them) here instead of Doctors only as has been the case up to now and by bypassing the safety net of NICE and going straight to the NHS.

&nbsp;

https://www.cia.gov/saynotodrugs/warondrugs.html

<P align=center><FONT size=+1>DCI Crime and Narcotics Center</FONT>

<IMG height=191 alt="CIA on the trail of illicit drugs" src="https://www.cia.gov/saynotodrugs/images/trail_t.jpg" width=321>
The Director of Central Intelligence Crime and Narcotics Center monitors, reviews, and delivers information about international trafficking in<STRONG> illegal </STRONG>drugs and international organized crime to our nation's leaders and law enforcement agencies.

Former Director of Central Intelligence William Webster created what became today's DCI Crime and Narcotics Center in April 1989. The center is staffed by people from the 13 agencies which make up the US Intelligence Community, including the CIA, and from law enforcement agencies.

The people who serve in the Crime and Narcotics Center can never say they have a slow day because the <STRONG>war on drugs </STRONG>and crime goes on around the clock and never takes a holiday. They have a big job, and many people look to them for help.

The Crime and Narcotics Center's staff's many jobs include:

<UL type=disc>
[*]
Estimating the amount of illegal drugs—coca, opium poppy, and marijuana—produced around the world. Their estimates about illegal drugs help our government leaders determine the level of the drug threat to our country and also how committed other countries are to the war on drugs.

[*]
Assisting law enforcement agencies break up drug and organized crime groups

[*]
Helping law enforcement agencies detect and capture illegal drug shipments
</LI>[/list]
By working closely with CIA offices and other agencies on crime and drug issues, the people who work in the Crime and Narcotics Center play a key role in helping destroy many drug and organized crime organizations.

What the Crime and Narcotics Center staff does seems like a lot of work, and it is. Did you know that the men and women of the Crime and Narcotics Center are moms and dads, too? They work hard to protect you and their own children from the pain and sorrow and criminal activities that are often the result of using illegal drugs.

<P align=left>The DCI Crime and Narcotics Center invites you to look at some of its publications about drugs..."

<P align=left><FONT face=Arial></FONT>&nbsp;

<P align=left><FONT face=Arial></FONT>&nbsp;

<P align=left><FONT face=Arial><EM>Clearly they don't have the time to spend looking at similar, but PRESCRIBED, drugs and their rates of increase or how it affects the real levels of crime:&nbsp; </EM></FONT>

<P align=left><EM><FONT face=Arial></FONT></EM>&nbsp;

<P align=left><EM><FONT face=Arial></FONT></EM>&nbsp;

<P align=left><FONT face=Arial>http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/artic ... E_ID=51934

"...Noting the <STRONG>millions taking high-powered antidepressants like Prozac</STRONG>, Grossman observes, ''we <STRONG>medicate</STRONG>, incarcerate and police ourselves at rates never seen before.''
Yet, he says, the biggest factor for lower crime rates is that<STRONG> ''we are lying about the data.'' </STRONG>
''The ''Crimestat'' program made cops accountable for bringing down crime ... <STRONG>When the NYPD police union went over the data the crime rates doubled in New York City if the proper classifications were applied.'' </STRONG>
Other than murder (held down by medical technology), the pressure on the cop on the beat means <STRONG>''police artificially 'bring crime down' </STRONG>and the root causes of the crime get off scott free, because we cook the books.'' ..."

"...Just a few more examples:

''In 2004, the Policeman's Benevolent Association in New York City revealed officials were ''cooking the books'' to lower crime statistics.''
''<STRONG>Felonies</STRONG> were classified as <STRONG>misdemeanors</STRONG>, <STRONG>rapes</STRONG> were logged as ‘<STRONG>''inconclusive incidents</STRONG>.''
<STRONG>''Attempted murder </STRONG>in a drive-by-shooting where the victim is missed might be reclassified as <STRONG>''criminal mischief.'</STRONG>'
''LAPD reported a <STRONG>28 percent drop </STRONG>in violent crime in 2005, <STRONG>the same year the department reclassified domestic assaults</STRONG> in which the victim suffered minor injuries or had no injuries.''
Since the FBI NIBRS counts only offense reports, not city charges, serious domestic violence – often tied to pornography use—<STRONG>is magically reduced </STRONG>by a city charge.
''On October 23, 2003, five New Orleans cops were fired for <STRONG>downgrading</STRONG> violent crime states.''
''On January 8, 2005, four members of the Broward County sheriff's command staff were fired. ''Sometimes a suspect would admit to dozens of crimes <STRONG>but only be charged with one</STRONG>.''
''In Atlanta, <STRONG>22,000 crimes were left out of the crime reports. In New York, the crime rates doubled in a precinct when the proper classification was applied by the police union.</STRONG> The list goes on.''
''The cops try to do their job, but they are handcuffed by some feel-good administrators <STRONG>who will not back them on controversial issues.</STRONG>''
''Compstat relies on intimidation [and some] <STRONG>administrators will not investigate the numbers that make them look good.</STRONG>''
''Everyone is happy except the <STRONG>citizens who get nothing but a false sense of security </STRONG>about the safety of their cities.''

&nbsp;

&nbsp;
</FONT>
<P align=left><FONT face=Arial><EM></EM></FONT>&nbsp;

&nbsp;
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

November 17th, 2006, 8:42 pm #7

&nbsp;
<SPAN name="Konabody"><FONT size=2>http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/a ... 1770</FONT>

<FONT size=2>

Use of drugs to treat hyperactive children soars fourfold in ten years
By KIRSTY WALKER, Political Correspondent

Last updated at 23:07pm on 10th November 2006

Reader comments (4)




Hyperactivity: 32,000 children are being treated at a cost of £13.5million a year.
</FONT></SPAN>

<SPAN name="Konabody"><FONT size=2><STRONG>Prescriptions for so-called 'chemical cosh' drugs to treat hyperactive children have risen fourfold since 1997</STRONG>, official figures reveal.

<STRONG>The trend has alarmed experts because Ritalin-type drugs have been linked to sudden deaths in the U.S. and Britain </STRONG>and its use has been under review in this country.

Department of Health figures show <STRONG>GPs wrote a record 384,000 prescriptions for Ritalin and related drugs last year</STRONG> - nearly 7,400 a week.

The total of annual prescriptions has for the first time overtaken the number of youngsters thought to have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

Around 32,000 children are being treated at a cost of £13.5million a year. But the National Institute for Clinical Excellence says as many as 366,000 - or 5 per cent - of youngsters under 18 have the disorder.

This will fuel fears that <STRONG>Ritalin is being used as an easy option to sedate healthy children rather than tackling the cause of their hyperactivity </STRONG>through diet and other means.

Concerns about the use of such drugs have mounted in recent years, <STRONG>amid evidence that they cause heart problems,</STRONG> dizziness and insomnia.

They have been blamed for <STRONG>nine deaths in the UK and more than 50 in America in one year</STRONG>. <STRONG>Dozens of youngsters have had serious heart problems.
</STRONG>
But a recent study found <STRONG>fish oil is better at treating hyperactivity</STRONG>. Experts say <STRONG>six capsules a day can vastly improve children's behaviour without the side-effects of the drugs</STRONG>.

Liberal Democrat spokesman for children Annette Brooke said: 'Parents will be eager that questions surrounding the safety of drugs like Ritalin are answered as soon as possible.

'The <STRONG>Government owes it to the thousands of concerned parents to be honest about the side-effects </STRONG>of these behaviour-altering drugs.

'More and more children are being prescribed drugs like Ritalin, but we must make sure parents are aware of all the available treatments.

'More GPs should be offering nutritional counselling and behavioural therapy before considering prescribing drugs to these young children.'

Dr Sami Tamimi, a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist, said: 'This is a concerning trend which I call <STRONG>the McDonaldisation of childhood mental health.
</STRONG>
'It is the search for an easy cure that fits in with our fast lifestyles and gives us a quick answer. This has resulted in an increase in the medicalisation of childhood problems.

'The long-term administration of these drugs can cause damage to the heart. <STRONG>There has been an increase in strokes, heart attacks and sudden deaths linked to these drugs.
</STRONG>
'There is a worrying gap in our knowledge about what happens when they are given over a long period of time.

'There are already concerns about the psychological effects, but <STRONG>we do not know what will happen to people who have been taking these drugs for 20 or 30 years.
</STRONG>
'These drugs have chemical elements which are the <STRONG>equivalent of speed and cocaine</STRONG>. It is time the medical profession held up its hands and said we have got this wrong.'

Swiss firm Novartis, maker of Ritalin - or methylphenidate - says the drug has a long record of being a safe and effective medication. <EM>[Site NB: New Labour&nbsp;won its first election with the aid of funding by Novartis and various other US sources&nbsp;- could that be something to do with it?]</EM></FONT></SPAN>
<SPAN name="Konabody"><FONT size=2>

Health Minister Andy Burnham said discussions are taking place in Europe about <STRONG>whether</STRONG> formal studies are needed into the drug's safety. <EM>[!!]
</EM>
He said: 'Since methylphenidate was authorised in the UK, representations regarding its safety have been received from MPs, patients and healthcare professionals.&nbsp;


'Some of these have specifically <STRONG>questioned the need </STRONG>for further research into its long-term safety.

'It is recognised that there is limited information about the longterm efficacy and safety of methylphenidate. Stimulants such as methylphenidate are known potentially to affect weight gain and growth.'

Ritalin is one of at least three drugs recommended by the NHS for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in young people for whom other treatments have failed - despite doctors' fears about side-effects.

But there have been reports of <STRONG>cardiovascular disorders, hallucinations, suicidal thoughts, drowsiness, dizziness, abdominal pain, decreased appetite, nausea and early waking</STRONG>. At least <STRONG>nine deaths </STRONG>have been reported to the UK's Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency since it became available in the early Nineties.

It belongs to a class of drugs called methylphenidates - <STRONG>in the same pharmaceutical family as cocaine and amphetamines</STRONG>.

The stimulant fires up parts of the brain involved in concentration, attention and activity. But it also decreases restlessness, leaving ADHD sufferers calmer and moderating their moods. It is not known how it has these opposite effects on the brain.

But it can also raise blood pressure, which is thought to be responsible for triggering heart problems in some users.

U.S. research found Ritalin may cause <STRONG>lasting changes to the brain</STRONG>. Rats given it as infants <STRONG>felt less pleasure and were more prone to despair </STRONG>as adults. .."</FONT>

</SPAN>
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 24th, 2006, 11:46 am #8

&nbsp;
<SPAN name="Konabody"><FONT size=2>&nbsp;</FONT>
<DIV><STRONG><FONT size=4>"Press Release November 20, 2006</FONT></STRONG></DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>
<DIV>
<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" align=left border=0>
<TBODY>
<TR>
<TD class=releasetitle>
<DIV><STRONG>
<DIV></STRONG><STRONG></STRONG>&nbsp;</DIV></DIV>
<DIV><STRONG></STRONG>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><STRONG>http://www.24-7pressrelease.com/view_pr ... ?rID=21052</STRONG></DIV>
<DIV><STRONG></STRONG>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><STRONG><FONT size=4>ADHD drug Strattera - new warnings, but the British MHRA didn't care to investigate 600 cases of suicidality and 12 000 "psychiatric reactions"</FONT></STRONG></DIV>
<DIV><STRONG></STRONG>&nbsp;</DIV></TD></TR>
<TR>
<TD class=releasesubtitle>
<DIV><EM><STRONG>The British medical agency MHRA will soon issue new warnings for Strattera but didn't care to investigate the reported 12000 "psychiatric reactions" from the drug. And even if number of reports of suicidality has doubled since last year the MHRA has accepted the PR-analysis of Eli Lilly as its own.</STRONG></EM></DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>/24-7PressRelease/ - HAGERSTEN, SWEDEN, November 20, 2006 - In its new report about the ADHD drug Strattera, expected to be published by the end of the month, the British Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) will issue new warnings about the harmful effects of the drug. This time about <STRONG>the risk for sudden cardiac death </STRONG>in connection with Strattera "treatment".

But the report <STRONG>will not </STRONG>take up all the <STRONG>"psychiatric reactions" </STRONG>known by the agency for almost a year. The reason is the MHRA didn't care to investigate them.

In January the agency wrote in its Risk:Benefit Assessment about, what it called, the "large number of psychiatric reactions" from Strattera. It said it had requested Eli Lilly "to perform a cumulative review of all psychiatric disorders reported for atomoxetine [Strattera]".

<STRONG>This review was however not submitted in January and thus was not part of the evaluation done by MHRA at the time.
</STRONG>
And still in the beginning of August no evaluation of these, at that time, <STRONG>more than 12 000 reported "psychiatric reactions", had been done. Eli Lilly had submitted no review. </STRONG>The MHRA explained that this would change: It had "asked [Eli Lilly] that it is submitted by 9 August. Upon receipt the data will be considered within Europe and consideration given to what regulatory action, if any, is appropriate."

But no consideration could be given, as Eli Lilly neither this time submitted any review.

As a consequence, in the beginning of September the MHRA announced there would be no review of all these "psychiatric reactions". <STRONG>When Eli Lilly didn't submit any documents to the MHRA by August 9 the agency dropped the request.</STRONG> Instead the agency started to refer to the analysis done by the FDA, considered by the FDA Pediatric Advisory Committee at its meeting on 22 March 2006. However the FDA review covered parts of all these reactions and was completed already in September 2005 -<STRONG> the MHRA knew all about it a long time ago.
</STRONG>
<STRONG>This means that the British MHRA, leading the current "safety review" of Strattera in Europe, didn't care to investigate what the agency itself called the "large number of psychiatric reactions". It didn't even get in any biased data about these harmful effects from the manufacturer Eli Lilly.
</STRONG>
Warnings that Strattera increase the risk of suicidality were issued internationally in September 2005 after Eli Lilly announced a "new analysis" of its clinical trials of the drug.

The number of reports of suicidality and self-injurious behaviour in connection with Strattera had as of May 2006 reached - 600! The number has doubled since September 2005.

Despite the fact that reported cases of suicidality are now over 600, <STRONG>the MHRA has failed to set up an independent investigation of these horrendous harmful effects.
</STRONG>
The agency has - as earlier - just accepted the review of Eli Lilly. The Lilly review from January this year (of earlier cases of suicidality) is an excellent example of how to explain away suicides, suicide attempts and suicidal ideation caused by psychiatric drugs. That the reports of suicidality doubled in just some months has not affected the operation of the MHRA - the agency continues to let the manufacturer explain away the harmful effects caused by the psychiatric drug.

Instead of protecting the welfare of children, the MHRA takes part in the forceful drugging of created young "patients" with the alleged psychiatric brain disorder ADHD (without any objective abnormality).

For the sake of children a full independent review of Strattera and the large number of cases of aggression, hostility, homicidal behaviour and ideation, psychosis, abnormal behaviour, suicides, suicide attempts and suicidal ideation must be done promptly.

Psychiatrists, Eli Lilly and medical agencies should no longer be allowed to hide the harmful effects of the drug.


Janne Larsson
writer from Sweden - investigating psychiatry </DIV></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV></FONT></SPAN>
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

December 1st, 2006, 5:55 pm #9

&nbsp;
<SPAN name="Konabody"><FONT size=2>http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story/s ... 7%7D</FONT>

<FONT size=2><STRONG><FONT size=5>California investigates antipsychotic medications
</FONT></STRONG>
<STRONG><FONT size=3>Update: 6:11 PM ET Nov 3, 2006
</FONT></STRONG>

</FONT><FONT size=3>(Updates to include Pfizer's receipt of subpoena in the sixth paragraph and adds comment from Lilly spokesman in the fourth paragraph.) </FONT></SPAN>

<SPAN name="Konabody">
California's top law-enforcement official is investigating drug makers' marketing practices for blockbuster antipyschotic medications. </SPAN>

<SPAN name="Konabody">
At least four pharmaceutical companies - AstraZeneca PLC (AZN), Eli Lilly & Co. (LLY), Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. (BMY) and Pfizer Inc. (PFE) - have disclosed in recent days they received subpoenas from the California attorney general's office seeking information about their respective antipsychotics. The drugs are approved to treat bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. </SPAN>

<SPAN name="Konabody">
Eli Lilly, which makes Zyprexa, and AstraZeneca, maker of Seroquel, indicated that the subpoenas received in September sought information about their marketing practices for the antipsychotics, as well as the drugs' status on California's "formulary," or list of preferred drugs for a state insurance program. </SPAN>

<SPAN name="Konabody">
Lilly of Indianapolis said in a regulatory filing Friday its subpoena was related to "our efforts to obtain and maintain Zyprexa's status on California's formulary." Also, Lilly said the subpoena concerned "remuneration of health care providers." Lilly spokesman Phil Belt said the company is cooperating with the request for information. AstraZeneca of the U.K. disclosed its subpoena in a document posted on its Web site last week. </SPAN>

<SPAN name="Konabody">
New York-based Bristol-Myers "has received a subpoena from the California state Department of Justice seeking documents in connection with" Abilify, Bristol-Myers' antipsychotic, spokesman Craig Stoltz told Dow Jones Newswires Friday. "Bristol-Myers is cooperating with the investigation." California's attorney general heads the state justice department. </SPAN>

<SPAN name="Konabody">
Pfizer of New York also has received a subpoena from the California attorney general's office seeking information about the Geodon antipsychotic, spokesman Bryant Haskins told Dow Jones Newswires Friday. The company is cooperating fully with the request, which was received in September, he said. </SPAN>

<SPAN name="Konabody">
Tom Dressler, a spokesman for the California attorney general, confirmed subpoenas were issued to AstraZeneca and Eli Lilly but declined to comment about other companies. He said the office is "trying to get more information about the marketing of these specific products and their status on the Medi-Cal formulary," referring to the state insurance program. </SPAN>

<SPAN name="Konabody">
The marketer of another leading antipsychotic, Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) of New Brunswick, N.J., couldn't immediately be reached. </SPAN>

<SPAN name="Konabody">
Newer antipsychotics have become big moneymakers for drug companies, with Zyprexa posting $4.2 billion in sales and Seroquel generating $2.76 billion last year. Abilify, a newer drug, posted sales of $912 million in 2005. </SPAN>

<SPAN name="Konabody">
But the drugs also have faced scrutiny over their effectiveness and safety. One government-funded study released earlier this year found that an older drug, clozapine, was more effective in treating certain patients with schizophrenia than three newer drugs: Zyprexa, Seroquel, and J&J's Risperdal. Clozapine is sold under the brand Clozaril by Novartis AG (NVS) of Switzerland. </SPAN>
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In another government-funded study, an older antipsychotic called perphenazine was found to have similar effectiveness to three newer ones: Risperdal, Seroquel and Pfizer's Geodon. This study showed Zyprexa to be more effective than the other drugs, but also linked it to more weight gain and higher blood sugar.


Last year, Lilly established a $690 million fund to settle lawsuits that generally alleged Zyprexa led to diabetes or related problems in people taking the drug. The company said the claims were without merit.


J&J has previously received inquiries from federal investigators over its marketing of Risperdal, according to regulatory filings. J&J said it was cooperating and responding to the subpoenas.


More recently, a study concluded there was little benefit of using antipsychotics to treat symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, despite the relatively common practice of doctors prescribing the drugs for that use.


AstraZeneca said last week it's in the initial stages of responding to the California request for information, but a spokeswoman declined further comment. "



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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

December 1st, 2006, 6:04 pm #10

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http://business.timesonline.co.uk/artic ... 26,00.html&nbsp;


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Pfizer defends its distribution deal<SPAN class=byline>By Robin Pagnamenta</SPAN>
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<DIV class=textcopy>Pfizer, the world’s largest drugs company, has written to MPs to defend its new distribution deal with Alliance-Boots against accusations that it poses a threat to patient safety and a blowout in NHS costs, The Times has learnt.
In a leaked letter, Pfizer addresses mounting concerns in Parliament about the new contract, which was signed in September and will mean that <STRONG>all UK chemists, dispensing doctors and hospitals buy Pfizer prescription medicines directly from Pfizer through UniChem, the wholesaling arm of Alliance-Boots. </STRONG>
</DIV></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>The new system,<STRONG> which Pfizer says </STRONG>is designed to prevent counterfeit drugs entering the supply chain, circumvents traditional UK pharmaceutical wholesalers and will mean that Pfizer deals directly with every chemist in the UK.

<STRONG><FONT size=4>The American company is fighting a growing political backlash against the project. Critics say that it will create a monopoly over the supply of Pfizer drugs, which could cost the NHS money and lead to delays in getting key medicines to patients. </FONT></STRONG>
The Pfizer letter, dated October 27, claimed that 33 MPs who had signed up to an early day motion against the deal were the victims of “misconception and myths”.
“We believe (the early day motion) to be based on inaccurate information provided by wholesalers that we have not chosen to partner with,” Owen Smith, Pfizer’s head of government affairs, writes. “Pfizer ran a competitive appointment process . . . Other wholesalers . . . were intimately involved in this process. During this period they did not express any concerns regarding the impact of our reforms on either patients or the NHS. We feel their campaign to mobilise opposition . . . is entirely motivated by commercial self-interest.”
Mr Smith claims that concerns that UniChem may not be able to ensure complete coverage of all pharmacies across the UK, creating a possible threat to patients, were groundless.
Jim McGovern, Labour MP for Dundee West, who tabled the motion after complaints from constituents, rebutted Pfizer’s claims. He said that the suggestion that his efforts had been based on lobbying by the company’s competitors was “untrue” and “offensive”.

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“Mr McGovern’s motion . . . is based on inaccurate information provided by wholesalers that we have not chosen to partner with.

“We feel that their [other wholesalers’] campaign to mobilise opposition to our proposals is entirely motivated by commercial self-interest.”

<STRONG>— Owen Smith, Pfizer’s head of government affairs</STRONG>
“Pfizer’s letter seems to suggest that my early day motion was based on my being lobbied by their competitors. This is simply untrue and the mere suggestion is slightly offensive.
“In my mind there are enough unanswered questions and serious concerns for the OFT to launch a full investigation into this deal. I hope that in the next few weeks they will be announcing that indeed they will.”

<STRONG>— Jim McGovern, Labour MP for Dundee West "</STRONG>
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