novel use of antipsychotic drugs in America

novel use of antipsychotic drugs in America

Joined: April 1st, 2004, 4:56 pm

January 1st, 2008, 9:57 am #1

New ICE chief discusses raids, goals
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Joined: April 1st, 2004, 4:56 pm

January 1st, 2008, 9:59 am #2

<STRONG>You are facing a lawsuit over forcibly giving antipsychotic drugs to people who are about to be deported and put on planes but are not resisting deportation. Has that policy changed at all?

</STRONG>Can't talk about that other than to say we did make changes with respect to our policy.

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Joined: April 1st, 2004, 4:56 pm

January 1st, 2008, 10:00 am #3


&nbsp;
Last edited by Ch_Isp_Morse on January 1st, 2008, 10:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 1st, 2004, 4:56 pm

January 1st, 2008, 10:06 am #4


http://edition.cnn.com/2007/US/10/12/doping.immigrants/

</B>&nbsp;

<B>LOS ANGELES, California (CNN)
-- Former detainees of Immigration and Customs Enforcement accuse the agency in a lawsuit of forcibly injecting them with psychotropic drugs while trying to shuttle them out of the country during their deportation.
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<DIV class=cnnImgChngr id=cnnImgChngr _extended="true"><!----><!--===========IMAGE============--><IMG height=219 alt=art.immigrant.jpg src="http://i.l.cnn.net/cnn/2007/US/10/12/doping.immigrants/art.immigrant.jpg" width=292 border=0><!--===========/IMAGE===========-->
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<!--===========CAPTION==========-->Raymond Soeoth, pictured here with his wife, says he was injected with drugs by ICE agents against his will.<!--===========/CAPTION=========-->
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One of the drugs in question is the potent anti-psychotic drug Haldol, which is often used to treat schizophrenia or other mental illnesses. Doctors say they are required to see patients in person before such drugs are administered.

Two immigrants, Raymond Soeoth of Indonesia and Amadou Diouf of Senegal in West Africa, told CNN they were injected with the drugs against their will.

Both are plaintiffs in a class-action lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union against the government. They are seeking an end to the alleged practice and unspecified damages. <SPAN class=cnnEmbeddedMosLnk><IMG height=14 alt=Video src="http://i.l.cnn.net/cnn/.element/img/2.0/mosaic/tabs/video.gif" width=16 border=0><FONT size=1> </FONT><STRONG><FONT color=#ca0002 size=1>Watch why the former detainees claim abuse »</FONT></STRONG></SPAN>

Dr. Paul Appelbaum, a professor of psychiatry, law and ethics at Columbia University, reviewed both men's medical records for this report and was stunned by what he discovered.

"I'm really shocked to find out that the government has been using physicians and using potent medications in this way," said Appelbaum, who also serves as a member of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

"That is the sort of thing that would be subject to a malpractice claim in the civilian world."

The allegations of <A class=cnnInlineTopic href="http://topics.edition.cnn.com/topics/u_s_bureau_of_immigration_and_customs_enforcement"><STRONG><FONT color=#004276>ICE</FONT></STRONG></A> forcibly drugging deportees were raised last month by Sen. Joe Lieberman, I-Connecticut, during the re-nomination hearing of ICE chief Julie Myers.
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"The information the committee has received from ICE regarding the forced drugging of immigration detainees is extremely troubling, particularly since it appears ICE may have violated its own detention standards," Lieberman spokeswoman Leslie Phillips told CNN in an e-mail.

"Senator Lieberman intends to follow up with ICE to ensure that detainees are not drugged unless there is a medical reason to do so."

ACLU attorney Ahilan Arulanantham, who is representing Soeoth and Diouf, said, "It would be torture to give a powerful anti-psychotic drug to somebody who isn't even mentally ill. ... But here, it's happening on U.S. soil to an immigrant the government is trying to deport."

Responding to Lieberman's written questions, Myers said 1,073 <A class=cnnInlineTopic href="http://topics.edition.cnn.com/topics/immigration"><STRONG><FONT color=#004276>immigration detainees</FONT></STRONG></A> had "medical escorts" for deportation since 2003.

From October last year to the end of April this year, she said 56 received psychotropic medications during the removal process. Of those, 33 detainees received medication "because of combative behavior with the imminent risk of danger to others and/or self," she said.

"First, I am aware of, and deeply concerned about reports that past practices may not have conformed to ICE detention standards," Myers said.

She added no detainee should be "involuntarily medicated without court order," except in emergency situations.

But both Soeoth and Diouf say they had not exhibited any combative behavior.
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Drug Facts<!-- KEEP -->• Haldol is a drug used to treat psychotic disorders and symptoms such as hallucinations, delusions and hostility "to control muscular tics of the face, neck, hands and shoulders"
• Side effects of the drug can include seizures, tremors, irregular heartbeat, difficulty breathing and other symptoms
• Cogentin is a drug used to treat symptoms of Parkinson's disease and to offset tremors caused by other medications
• Side effects can include drowsiness, difficulty urinating, depression and delusions

<EM>Source: National Institutes of Health</EM> </DIV><!--endclickprintexclude-->
Soeoth, a Christian minister from Indonesia, spent 27 months in detention awaiting deportation after his bid for political asylum was rejected. Hours before he was to be sent back home on December 7, 2004, he says guards injected him with a mystery drug that made him groggy for two days. <STRONG><FONT color=#004276>See the document that shows Soeoth was injected</FONT></STRONG>

"They pushed me on the bench, they opened my pants, and they just give me injection," he said through broken English.

He says he was taken to Los Angeles International Airport while in this drug-induced stupor, but two hours before takeoff, airline security refused to transport him, so ICE agents returned him to his cell at Terminal Island near Los Angeles. Terminal Island, once a federal prison, is a crowded facility along the ocean where hundreds of illegal immigrants await deportation.

Soeoth's medical records indicate he was injected with Cogentin and Haldol, even though those same records show he has no history of mental illness.

In the records, the government says he was injected with the drug after he said he would kill himself if deported -- a remark Soeoth denies ever making.

ICE said in a written statement it couldn't respond to specific allegations due to pending litigation.

"Department of Homeland Security law enforcement personnel may not and do not prescribe or administer medication to detainees," the ICE statement said. "Only trained and qualified medical professionals, including officers of the U.S. Public Health Service, may prescribe or administer medication."
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But, Diouf says, he was injected on the plane right before he was to be deported. He said he even had a federal stay of his deportation -- and the paperwork to prove it -- but his U.S. government escorts wouldn't let him show it to the pilot of the plane preparing to fly him out of the country. <STRONG><FONT color=#004276>See Diouf's stay of deportation document</FONT></STRONG>

That's when, he says, "I was wrestled to the ground and injected through my clothes."

A government report says he was medicated because he did not follow orders.
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In both cases, Diouf and Soeoth remain in the United States pending a decision in the case. If they lose, they may land back in the hands of ICE, once again facing deportation.

Soeoth says he's traumatized by what happened. "I know this country [is] very generous to immigrants," he says. "What they did to me was very, very bad."<!--startclickprintexclude--><SPAN class=cnnEmbeddedMosLnk><FONT size=1> </FONT><STRONG><FONT color=#ca0002 size=1>E-mail to a friend</FONT></STRONG><FONT size=1> <IMG height=14 alt="E-mail to a friend" src="http://i.l.cnn.net/cnn/.element/img/2.0/mosaic/util/email.gif" width=17 border=0></FONT></SPAN><!--endclickprintexclude-->

<P class=cnnAttribution>CNN's Wayne Drash, Traci Tamura and Gregg Cane contributed to this report
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Joined: April 1st, 2004, 4:56 pm

January 1st, 2008, 10:24 am #6

&nbsp;
"They pushed me on the bench, they opened my pants, and they just give me injection," he said through broken English.

He says he was taken to Los Angeles International Airport while in this drug-induced stupor, but two hours before takeoff, airline security refused to transport him, so ICE agents returned him to his cell at Terminal Island near Los Angeles. Terminal Island, once a federal prison, is a crowded facility along the ocean where hundreds of illegal immigrants await deportation.

Soeoth's medical records indicate he was injected with Cogentin and Haldol, even though those same records show he has no history of mental illness.
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Joined: April 1st, 2004, 4:56 pm

January 1st, 2008, 10:32 am #7

New ICE chief discusses raids, goals
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Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and the Division of Immigration Health ServicesThe American Civil Liberties Union filed a class action lawsuit against the three US government agencies for allegedly drugging deported immigrants with sedatives. The lawsuit was filed against the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and the Division of Immigration Health Services.

One plaintiff was being deported back to Indonesia from Los Angels when immigration agents injected him with the sedative, antipsychotic drug Haldol. Another plaintiff was being deported to the Republic of Senegal when medical escorts wrestled him to the floor of the airplane and injected him with the sedative. Both men are free in the US while their immigration cases are on appeal.

A spokeswoman for ICE noted that decisions about immigrants' medical care are made by the US Public Health Service, which "does not involuntarily pre-medicate or sedate a detainee solely to facilitate removal efforts, unless authorized by a judge's removal order."

If you feel you should be included in this pending class action lawsuit, please contact the [<A class=standard12 href="http://www.aclu.org/contact/index.html" target=_blank>American Civil Liberties Union</A>]

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