New (lol) quick treatment for AVIAN and SWINE flu...

New (lol) quick treatment for AVIAN and SWINE flu...

Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 10th, 2009, 10:49 pm #1


 

<span class="byline">The Times</span>
August 11, 2009
New single-dose swine flu drug is found to work as well as Tamiflu<h2></h2><span class="small"></span><span class="byline">Hannah Devlin </span><span class="float-left global-comment-seperator"></span><span class="float-left padding-left-8 padding-top-2"><a>http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/u ... </a></span>' );" href="http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/u ... 5.ece#none">[color=#999999" size="1]Recommend? [/color][color=#999999" size="1]</font>[color=#999999" size="1][/color]<font color="#999999" size="1">[/color]
A new, single-dose swine flu drug has been shown to work as well as Tamiflu in large-scale clinical trials, it was announced yesterday. The drug could play a crucial role in preventing flu viruses from becoming drug resistant because of patients not finishing their course of medication for reasons including adverse side-effects.

Avian flu and the ordinary seasonal virus can also be treated. The medication, known as Laninamivir, is taken as a single dose with the same kind of inhaler that is used for asthma.

We see in trials that about 20 per cent of people dont finish the course of treatment, said Peter Openshaw, a specialist in respiratory diseases at Imperial College London.

The smaller dose also means that Laninamivir will be much easier to stockpile.
Related Links It was tested in a thousand patients infected with two types of seasonal flu in Japan. Patients treated with Laninamivir recovered as quickly as those given Tamiflu and had fewer side-effects.

A study, published in the journal Nature, showed that the drug was just as effective against swine flu and the H5N1 bird flu virus.

John Oxford, a virology specialist at Queen Mary, University of London, described the result as a mini-breakthrough in a long-stated goal for flu treatment, and said that it could not have come at a better time. But he added that swine flu would be around for some time to come. Were in for a long haul, he said.

Laninamivir is manufactured by the Australian company Biota, which expects to submit an application to market the drug in Japan by early next year.

The company is seeking a licensing partner to market the drug in the US and Europe. Roche, the Swiss pharmaceutical company, has been suggested as a likely candidate.

Research published by the University of Oxford suggests that the automatic prescription of anti-virals for otherwise healthy patients is not the best policy, as the drugs only reduce the length of illness by one day. However, scientists predict that by next year more old people, who have some immunity to the current virus, will be infected.

Within 18 months it will have mutated and then it will move up the age range, Professor Oxford said.
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 10th, 2009, 10:56 pm #2

http://www.nutraingredients.com/Researc ... rus-in-labNews headlines > <strong>Research</strong>
<a>http://www.nutraingredients.com/Researc ... rus-in-lab', 'Sambucol fights bird flu virus in lab' )" onclick="return addthis_sendto()" onmouseout=addthis_close() href="http://www.addthis.com/bookmark.php?v=2 ... dnmaccount" rel=nofollow>Share</a> <a>Text size</a> Print Email this page News by email
Sambucol fights bird flu virus in labBy Dominique Patton, 26-Jan-2006
Related topics: Research, Phytochemicals, plant extracts, Immune system, Respiratory health
<h4></h4>
Sambucol, a standardized extract of black elderberry, has been found to fight the avian flu virus H5N1, revealed British researchers last week.

A team at Retroscreen Virology, an institute associated with the University of London, said that the extract was at least 99 per cent effective against the H5N1 virus and significantly neutralized the infectivity of the virus in cell cultures.

Dr Madeleine Mumcuoglu, the Israel-based developer of Sambucol, said the good results confirmed her earlier findings on the product, which is currently marketed around the world as a natural supplement for fighting common flu.



"It is active against lots of different types of flu viruses and I did my PhD on its effect on a non-virulent strain of bird flu so the results did not surprise me," she told NutraIngredients.com.



"But I'm very happy with these results, especially as the work was done by Dr John Oxford, a reputable specialist in flu," she added.



Dr Mumcuoglu stressed that the results could in no way demonstrate a benefit for humans infected with the bird flu strain that has killed more than 70 people, mostly in South East Asia, since the outbreak began in 2003. Nor will she be able to test it in a human trial.



But she is looking into starting an animal trial using ferrets, which have similar flu symptoms to humans.



Dr Mumcuoglu added that bird flu is still a lower threat than common flu, thought to kill about 25,000 people in the UK alone each year through complications.



While the new bird flu results might boost sales of Sambucol, it is the evidence from two human clinical trials on human flu that has created a significant market for the product. The double blind, placebo-controlled studies - the first done in Israel, and the second in Norway - both found that people who took the elderberry supplement got rid of flu in half the time of the placebo group, or after two to three days compared to about six.



Dr Mumcuoglu says Sambucol blunts the haemaglutinin spikes on the outside of viruses and stops them from entering cells where they reproduce, cause the cell to explode and allow the virus to continue invading the body.



An in vitro study has also shown Sambucol to be effective in increasing the production of four inflammatory cytokines, suggesting that the supplement may have an immuno-stimulatory effect and therefore be worth taking all year round to prevent flu and other disease.



Jerusalem-based Razei Bar Industries now produces more than 1.5 million bottles of Sambucol syrup, with average growth of 10 per cent each year.



"I didn't invent anything," claims Dr Mumcuoglu. "<strong>Elderberry has been known from the beginning of time.</strong> What people didn't know is what the active ingredient is, how to keep it intact and how to formulate to keep it active."



This active substance has not been patented to protect the firm's market. While several copycat products are available in healthstores, Razei Bar says it has tested several of these and found none of the active ingredient.



The new laboratory results were presented at a press conference held in the Royal Society of Medicine, London last week. Another trial is now underway at Hadassah Medical Organization Ein Kerem in Israel.


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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 10th, 2009, 11:08 pm #3


Because the rest of us seem to be having to do this for you.

If you can't research and act to protect your patients, then you'd be better off working in a factory.  Just like many other better skilled (BRIGHTER, MORE INTELLIGENT) graduates end up doing by no fault of their own.

You're just guys who passed exams. You're NOTHING if you can't even keep up with the common people by researching.

 

<strong>DO NOT GIVE OUR CHILDREN TAMIFLU.  LOOK IT UP, its a DANGEROUS drug.</strong>

You're a doctor huh? THEN GET OFF YOU ASSES AND LEARN the same as the rest of us do it.  If you you can't do that, then you're a waste of space.  There is NO EXCUSE for idleness when kids lives are on the line.  For christs sake, its seems mostly to be the uneducated that find out more about clinical trial date on no end of stuff than YOU lot do.  Get a grip or get out of the medical profession, we don't need qualified dullards in society.
 

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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 10th, 2009, 11:14 pm #4


which puts you in common with lots of 'non' doctors who would do anything (yes thats ANYTHING) to get yourselves seen "on the telly". 

We need <strong>DOCTORS</strong>, not pathetic individuals who want an egotrip. Get back to principles, if you ever had any.
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 10th, 2009, 11:20 pm #5


Hardly any of you have the guts to stand up for what your 'profession' pretends to represent.

There's a 'professional' place not far from me. The only difference is that the one not far from me will  stand out in their doorway in unacceptable clothing now and again hence you can tell where their principles lie. 
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 10th, 2009, 11:35 pm #6


He is so right. Lots of 'Fuckwits' have been cashing in and getting their oh so important little  selves on the telly by giving their qualified but unresearched and uneducated 'professional' opinions on the TV this last few days.  Fuckwits.

http://nhsblogdoc.blogspot.com/2009/07/ ... ckwit.html
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 10th, 2009, 11:44 pm #7


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... -week.html
Fears rise over side effects of Tamiflu as cases of adverse reactions double in a week

By Daniel Martin
Last updated at 2:00 AM on <strong>03rd August 2009</strong>


Fears over the side effects of Tamiflu grew last night as it was revealed that the number of suspected <strong>adverse reactions had doubled in one week.</strong>

Figures from the drugs safety watchdog, seen by the Daily Mail, show there have been <strong>293 reports of side effects from the powerful antiviral since the beginning of April, </strong>when the swine flu outbreak began.

This compares to the 150 reported the week before - <strong>a jump of 143 in only seven days</strong>. <strong>The cases include heart and eye problems, and psychiatric disorders.</strong>
<img height="367" alt="Tamiflu" src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/08/ ... 68x367.jpg" width="468">
<strong>More than half of children who take Tamiflu suffer from nausea, nightmares and other reactions, a study found
</strong>

The figures come only a few days after a study showed that<strong> more than half of children who take Tamiflu suffer from nausea, nightmares and other reactions</strong>.

The massive rise coincides with the launch of the National Pandemic Flu Service, which allows Britons for the first time to get Tamiflu over the phone or internet without the intervention of a GP.

In the first three days of its operation - between 24 and 26 July - no fewer than 150,000 Tamiflu packs were handed out.

A growing number of doctors have raised concerns over whether the drug is being handed out too readily, putting many at needless risk of side effects when in the majority of instances, swine flu is a mild illness.

The 293 cases, reported by doctors to the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, are only of suspected adverse reactions. However, those that turn out not to have been caused by Tamiflu are likely to be only a fraction of the total.

There were 465 separate reactions reported, referring to 293 individuals.

Around a third involved gastrointestinal problems, such as vomiting and diarrhoea.

But there were <strong>also cases of heart and eye problems - together with 46 cases of psychiatric disorders and 48 disorders of the nervous system. There has also been one unexplained death.</strong>

Last week England's top doctor urged parents to continue giving their children Tamiflu if they come down with swine flu.

Sir Liam Donaldson, the chief medical officer, appealed for calm after the release of a study which showed that 53 per cent of children who take it suffer from nausea, nightmares and other reactions.

Sir Liam said: 'All drugs do have side effects. It is always a case of deciding the balance between benefiting a patient from a treatment and the side effects.'

There are, however, fears that if Tamiflu and the other antiviral drug Relenza are given to too many, it could lead to the flu virus developing resistance to them - leaving-Britain defenceless against swine flu until the arrival of new vaccines.

A spokesman for the MHRA said: 'Tamiflu and Relenza are acceptably safe medicines and most people will not suffer any side effects. The balance of risks and benefits for Tamiflu and Relenza remains positive.'


Gap year students have been advised against charity work in Third World countries - because they could do more harm than good by spreading swine flu.

Professor Robert Dingwall, an adviser to the Department of Health, said young Britons had a 'personal ethical responsibility' to consider cancelling such work.

Developing countries have a shortage of antiviral drugs, and are likely to be at the back of the queue once a vaccine becomes available.

Writing in the Observer, Professor Dingwall added: 'Staying at home this year will often be the morally right thing to do.' 



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... z0NpIcFeMX

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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 10th, 2009, 11:49 pm #8


Time perhaps to bring those DOCTORS in the UK to account, they don't have the excuse anymore of 'I didn't know'.  Years have passed since that could have been a valid excuse.  Now lots of us all over the place know and if we know, then surely the medical profession should know before us.

Time for individuals being well paid to care for their patients to be made to be accountable for their actions perhaps.
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 10th, 2009, 11:58 pm #9


Another well paid <strong>FUCKWIT</strong> putting the drug makers interests before the safety of children

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... -week.html

"Fears rise over side effects of Tamiflu as cases of adverse reactions double in a week ...
 
"...<strong>Sir Liam Donaldson, the chief medical officer</strong>, appealed for calm after the release of a study which showed that <strong>53 per cent of children who take it suffer from nausea, nightmares and other reactions. </strong>

Sir Liam said: 'All drugs do have side effects. It is always a case of <strong>deciding the balance between benefiting a patient from a treatment and the side effects</strong>.'
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 11th, 2009, 12:01 am #10


<em>http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... k.html</em>

<em>"Fears rise over side effects of Tamiflu as cases of adverse reactions double in a week ...
 
"...<strong>Sir Liam Donaldson, the chief medical officer</strong>..."</em>
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