Medicine or Drug? "Grab your purse, pop a Prozac...we're having a girl's night"

Medicine or Drug? "Grab your purse, pop a Prozac...we're having a girl's night"

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

March 9th, 2007, 1:10 pm #1


<STRONG>POP A PROZAC</STRONG>?&nbsp; You don't "pop an Aspirin" or "pop an Antibiotic".&nbsp; People with a habit&nbsp;"<STRONG>pop</STRONG>" <STRONG>DRUGS.</STRONG>

<STRONG>http://www.al.com/entertainment/birminghamnews/index.ssf?/base/entertainment/117343221650960.xml&coll=2</STRONG>

<STRONG>Menopause the Musical' is one hilarious hot flash</STRONG>

<DIV class=subhead>
</DIV>
<DIV class=byln>Friday, March 09, 2007
<DIV>
<DIV>PAMELA MORSE</DIV></DIV><B><B>For The Birmingham News</B> </DIV>
Grab your purse, pop a Prozac. Put on your comfortable shoes and your 18-hour bra. We're having a girls' night. And for gosh-golly's sake, leave your husband at home.

It's "Menopause the Musical," and it's completely entertaining - if you are in the company of women who get it.

Men won't get it. They don't want to. You don't want them to. Trust me on this. ..."

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

March 9th, 2007, 10:54 pm #2


http://icsouthlondon.icnetwork.co.uk/01 ... _page.html

<STRONG><FONT size=4>Husband who blugeoned wife locked up in mental unit </FONT></STRONG>
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<P class=headtypea align=left><STRONG>THEY were known as the perfect couple. But on January 30, pensioner Walter Tyrrell bludgeoned his wife of 54 years to death with a pair of garden shears to 'put her out of her misery'. Locked up for the safety of the public, Tyrrell is likely to spend his final days in a secure mental unit. </STRONG>

<P class=headtypea align=left><STRONG>BEN ASHFORD examines his chilling crime.</STRONG>

<P class=headtypea align=left>HIS heart pounding, frail Walter Tyrrell slipped from his marital bed while his wife of 54 years slept serenely.

<P class=headtypea align=left>Creeping so he didn't wake her, the 78-year-old headed to the garden shed in his pyjamas and armed himself with a pair of shears.

<P class=headtypea align=left>Returning to the bed, the grandad-of-six surveyed the sleeping woman before bringing the heavy blades crashing down on her head.

<P class=headtypea align=left>Unsuspecting Joan Tyrrell, 76, was killed instantly. Her cruel and shocking death marking the senseless climax to more than 50 years of seemingly blissful marriage.

<P class=headtypea align=left>Moments after killing his wife, Walter Tyrrell made a tearful call to son Martin.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"I think Mum's dead," he told him.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"I think I might have killed her."



<P class=headtypea align=left>Police arrived at the neatly-kept terraced property in Croxted Road, Dulwich, to find Mr Tyrrell sitting quietly on the doorstep.



<P class=headtypea align=left>Upstairs, officers found the dead mum-of two lying on her back.



<P class=headtypea align=left>A blood-stained pillow had been placed over her face, the garden shears were next to her.



<P class=headtypea align=left>Walter, trembling uncontrollably and still in his pyjamas and dressing grown, broke down in front of them.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"I love her so much," he confessed.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"I wanted to put her out of her misery."



<P class=headtypea align=left>Dazed and distraught, the pensioner was taken to a police station where the heart-wrenching tale of his wife's demise would eventually unfold.



<P class=headtypea align=left>Walter Tyrrell had <STRONG>no</STRONG> previous convictions or history of violence.



<P class=headtypea align=left><STRONG>Neighbours told police they hadn't heard the couple exchange a cross word in 40 years.</STRONG>



<P class=headtypea align=left>Close friends described them as <STRONG>devoted and inseparable </STRONG>- a "<STRONG>pair made in heaven</STRONG>".



<P class=headtypea align=left>He was polite, calm and well-mannered - particular about his garden and meticulous in the accounts he kept for the area's Scout troop.



<P class=headtypea align=left>Joan, an energetic fundraiser, had completed a sponsored walk for Alzheimer's sufferers less than a year earlier.



<P class=headtypea align=left>In the months before her death, however, Walter had become increasingly anxious over an eye condition affecting his wife's sight.



<P class=headtypea align=left>She had suffered with macular degeneration and was blind in one eye. But otherwise, she was fit, happy and healthy.



<P class=headtypea align=left>Nevertheless, her husband, <STRONG>with a history of depression</STRONG>, <STRONG>believed she was suffering badly and complained to doctors of feeling low</STRONG>.



<P class=headtypea align=left>In a police interview, he admitted killing his wife but claimed he <STRONG>couldn't remember </STRONG>delivering the fatal blows.



<P class=headtypea align=left>He told how his wife's eye condition had increasingly upset him but said the exact moments leading to her death were nothing more than "<STRONG><FONT size=5>a fog</FONT></STRONG>".



<P class=headtypea align=left>The OAP repeatedly broke down in custody&nbsp; and begged police to let him <STRONG>commit suicide</STRONG>.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"I didn't mean to," he sobbed.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"I couldn't let her suffer. I wanted to put her out of her misery. Give me something to go with her. What have I done?"



<P class=headtypea align=left>Frail and ashen-faced, the pensioner appeared before the Old Bailey on Tuesday to plead guilty to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility.



<P class=headtypea align=left>Judge Martin Stephens ordered his detention at St Andrew's Hospital in Northampton under the Mental Health Act.



<P class=headtypea align=left>He said it was for the safety of the public, including Tyrrell's family, that he remain there indefinitely "At the age of 78 you carried out a most appalling attack on a lady you had shared your life with for more than 50 years," the judge told him.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"You attacked as she lay helpless in bed.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"There have been instances of mental illness in your life but nothing to suggest you would do this to a woman with whom you'd had a happy and fulfilling relationship for so long."



<P class=headtypea align=left>Tyrrell listened attentively to the court proceedings and politely thanked the judge before being led away.



<P class=headtypea align=left>When the South London Press contacted his son Martin at his home in Sutton after the hearing, he said he was glad rumours surrounding his mum's death had been put to rest.



<P class=headtypea align=left>But he declined to talk about the tragic events of January 30, saying he felt there was nothing more he could add.



<P class=headtypea align=left><STRONG>'A Pair Made In Heaven'</STRONG>



<P class=headtypea align=left>IT WAS almost 40 years ago that energetic couple Walter and Joan Tyrrell introduced themselves to neighbours.



<P class=headtypea align=left><STRONG>Deeply in love </STRONG>and seemingly devoted to one another, they left a glowing impression on residents in tree-lined Croxted Road, Dulwich. Their recently-acquired terraced property was to become their pride and joy; a smartly-kept marital home where their children, Martin and Sue, would grow up in serene suburban happiness.



<P class=headtypea align=left>Wally and Joanie - as they were <STRONG>affectionately known by neighbours</STRONG> - quickly became friends with Geoffrey and Rita Gent.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"<STRONG>They were very, very good people</STRONG>," recalled Geoffrey, 74.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"We always had a good relationship with them from the day they moved in.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"He was keen a gardener and we would always have a good laugh out the back.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"When we swept up the leaves Wally would always joke, 'You missed a few'.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"Joanie was a bit of a keep-fit fanatic. She would love a gossip at the front gate and did a lot for the Scouts, charities and children's hospitals.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"Wally would walk to the garage every day, pick up the car and bring it to the doorstep.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"He treated her like royalty."



<P class=headtypea align=left>&nbsp;Wife Rita, 73, remembered the Tyrrells as a <STRONG>devoted couple</STRONG>.



<P class=headtypea align=left>She said: "In <STRONG>40 years I cannot remember them having a single cross word with one another</STRONG>.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"They were <STRONG>a pair made in heaven</STRONG>."



<P class=headtypea align=left>Rita put the barbaric act that ended Joan Tyrrell's life in January down to a <STRONG>momentary blackout</STRONG>." Geoffrey had no explanation.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"He's such a pint-sized man you would never have thought it possible," he added, tears welling in his eyes.



<P class=headtypea align=left>"I tried to see him a few months ago but they told me <STRONG>he had tried to jump out of a window</STRONG>."

<P class=headtypea align=left>&nbsp;

<P class=headtypea align=left>&nbsp;
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

March 9th, 2007, 11:09 pm #3

<STRONG>POP A PROZAC</STRONG>?&nbsp; You don't "pop an Aspirin" or "pop an Antibiotic".&nbsp; People with a habit&nbsp;"<STRONG>pop</STRONG>" <STRONG>DRUGS.</STRONG>

<STRONG>http://www.al.com/entertainment/birminghamnews/index.ssf?/base/entertainment/117343221650960.xml&coll=2</STRONG>

<STRONG>Menopause the Musical' is one hilarious hot flash</STRONG>

<DIV class=subhead>
</DIV>
<DIV class=byln>Friday, March 09, 2007
<DIV>
<DIV>PAMELA MORSE</DIV></DIV><B><B>For The Birmingham News</B> </DIV>
Grab your purse, pop a Prozac. Put on your comfortable shoes and your 18-hour bra. We're having a girls' night. And for gosh-golly's sake, leave your husband at home.

It's "Menopause the Musical," and it's completely entertaining - if you are in the company of women who get it.

Men won't get it. They don't want to. You don't want them to. Trust me on this. ..."

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http://www.leedstoday.net/ViewArticle.aspx?SectionID=39&ArticleID=1426660

<DIV class=headline id=ds-headline>
Son arrested after throat-slash horror </DIV>
By Mark Lavery


















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