"Doctor" ( ex FDA) HENRY MILLER Attacks NY Times critcising ELI LILLY

"Doctor" ( ex FDA) HENRY MILLER Attacks NY Times critcising ELI LILLY

Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

January 23rd, 2007, 12:53 am #1


<EM>"Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, <STRONG><FONT size=5>was an F.D.A. official from 1979 to 1994</FONT></STRONG>. </EM>Barron's<EM> selected his most recent book, "The Frankenfood Myth," one of the 25 Best Books of 2004"&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <STRONG>[in whose opinion?]</STRONG></EM>

<EM></EM>&nbsp;

<EM>http://www.tcsdaily.com/article.aspx?id=011807B</EM>

"<STRONG><FONT size=5>Crazy Lawyering, Crazy Journalism
</FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;
&nbsp;By Dr. Henry I. Miller&nbsp; 22 Jan 2007&nbsp;
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
Would you try to review a 700-page book after reading a single paragraph? Of course not - but major newspapers have done the equivalent, by publishing sensational and censorious articles about defendants in civil litigation that are based on selective leaks from lawyers. Unethical lawyering combined with shoddy journalism threatens many sectors of the economy, especially those that commonly face costly lawsuits alleging torts -- the drug, chemical, automobile and financial sectors, among others.

An egregious example occurred recently when a lawyer who represents mentally ill patients violated a gag order by leaking to various news outlets documents related to litigation over damages allegedly caused by Eli Lilly Company's anti-psychotic drug, Zyprexa. Based on information that was obviously incomplete and out of context, the New York Times made outrageous - and often misleading - allegations in news articles and editorials.

Lawyers owe their clients zealous representation, to be sure, but that is not the same as conducting an ideological vendetta in the media or attempting to poison the jury pool by trying a case in the newspapers and on National Public Radio. James B. Gottstein, the lawyer who leaked selected documents concerning the Zyprexa litigation to the New York Times and other media outlets, certainly appears to fall into the former category. He admits to conducting a "campaign against forced (court ordered) psychiatric drugging and electroshock around the country," because "the massive amounts of forced drugging in this country, amounting to probably at least a million cases a year, is resulting in decreased, rather than increased, public safety; causing an almost unimaginable amount of physical harm, including death; [sic] turning many patients into drooling zombies." The culprits? "In large part, this state of affairs has been created by the lies told by the manufacturers of psychiatric drugs . . ."

<STRONG>Mr. Gottstein appears to think he qualifies as a mental health expert because he has experienced psychotic episodes intermittently for a quarter-century.</STRONG> (See his autobiographical information at http://akmhcweb.org/recovery/jgrec.htm.) I think he needs to have his medications adjusted.

Within the past month, two federal judges independently have harshly condemned both the underhanded manner of Mr. Gottstein's obtaining of the documents and his dissemination of them, which violated a court-issued gag order. Another jurist, Judge Jack B. Weinstein, who is presiding over the consolidated federal cases in the Zyprexa litigation, wrote this about the need to prevent unauthorized leaks: "First, the cost and time to explain a single document taken out of context by a plaintiff's lawyer creates an incentive not to prepare memoranda. Second, what appears damning may, in context after difficult proof, be shown to be neutral or even favorable to the defendant." My own experience as an expert witness (in other litigation) corroborates Judge Weinstein's observations.

Access only to documents that argue one side of the case has not deterred the Times from repeated, vicious attacks on Lilly and Zyprexa, a drug widely prescribed and highly regarded by psychiatrists. In spite of relatively frequent side effects - the most common of which are sleepiness, weight gain and dry mouth - the drug has been administered to almost 20 million seriously ill patients in 84 countries. Many psychiatrists consider it a wonder drug for two of the most debilitating mental illnesses: schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

The Times (and other papers that subscribe to its news service) accuses Lilly of promoting Zyprexa for not yet approved, or "off-label," uses, but the F.D.A. - which carefully monitors and takes a dim view of such violations of federal regulations - has never issued a warning to the company about this.

Without access to the complete database related to the litigation, I cannot judge the merits of the other accusations against Lilly and Zyprexa. However, the Times' call for Lilly's protestations of innocence regarding promotion of off-label uses "to be tested in Congressional hearings that should focus on how well the industry complies with existing laws and how effectively the F.D.A. regulates the industry's marketing materials" is clearly disingenuous. The Times knows that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and influential committee chairmen such as Senator Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.), Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) and John Dingell (D-Mich.) have long been antagonistic to the pharmaceutical industry, and that such hearings would be no more than a witch hunt.

<EM>Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, was an F.D.A. official from 1979 to 1994. Barron's selected his most recent book, "The Frankenfood Myth," one of the 25 Best Books of 2004</EM>."
Last edited by SSRIAdmin on January 23rd, 2007, 1:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

January 23rd, 2007, 1:04 am #2


http://query.<FONT size=5>nytimes.com</FONT>/gst/fullpage.html?sec=health&res=9800E4D8133BF933A05753C1A964948260

&nbsp;

A NEW INSULIN GIVEN APPROVAL FOR USE IN U.S.<!-- #adxToolSponsor --><!-- .toolsContainer --><!-- .articleTools --><!-- .toolsRight -->


<DIV id=articleBody>
The Food and Drug Administration yesterday approved the marketing of human insulin made artificially from gene-splicing techniques. It is the first such product of genetic engineering to be granted Governmental approval for human use.

The new insulin, called Humulin, is manufactured by a technique known as recombinant DNA, which involves inserting human genetic instructions into a bacterium that then produces the drug.

The approval by the Food and Drug Administration came five months after application was made by Eli Lilly and Company of Indianapolis, Ind. Normally, such approval takes 20 to 30 months.

To Be Available in 1983

The efforts to produce the artificial human hormone commercially began four years ago, after scientists at the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, Calif., and Genentech Inc. in South San Francisco first succeeded in producing it in the laboratory.

The new insulin is expected by its manufacturer to be available in drug stores without a prescription sometime in 1983. A spokesman for Lilly said Humulin was expected to cost about twice as much initially as the animal insulins now used by an estimated two million of the 10 million diabetics in the United States. Called a Major Step Forward

<STRONG><FONT size=5>Dr. Henry Miller, the medical officer in charge of Humulin at the F.D.A.</FONT></STRONG>, said the development was a

<STRONG><FONT size=5>major step forward </FONT></STRONG>

in the ''scientific and commercial viability of'' recombinant DNA techniques. ''We have now come of age,'' Dr. Miller said.

Dr. Irving L. Spratt, president of the American Diabetes Association, said: ''The announcement is an exciting event in medicine. It demonstrates the melding of intensive research in genetic engineering with complex pharmaceutical production.''

The new insulin is being manufactured by <STRONG><FONT size=5>Lilly under license from Genentech.</FONT></STRONG> The insulin now used to treat diabetics is derived from animals, usually pigs and cattle. Although no shortage of animal insulin exists now, some experts believe one may arise in a decade or so. Production of insulin in genetically engineered bacterial ''factories'' promises to make unlimited amounts available.

The artificial hormone is made in the laboratory with gene-splicing techniques perfected in the 1970's. Technicians assemble genes carrying the code that normally instructs a human's pancreas to produce insulin. In a diabetic, the pancreas fails to produce that insulin, or enough of it, to perform its required function of helping to convert blood sugar into body fuel.

These insulin genes are then inserted into plasmids, packages of a genetic material taken from bacteria. The plasmids can then be inserted into bacteria and the bacteria are then stimulated to begin synthesizing the human insulin, which the technicians can extract from the bacteria.

Humulin differs from the animal insulins in that its molecules are more nearly like those produced by the human pancreas gland.

&nbsp;

<STRONG><FONT size=5>Few Clinical Advantages </FONT></STRONG>

Humulin was found to be safe and effective in tests involving about 400 patients in 12 medical centers in the United States, according to Dr. Miller. <STRONG><FONT size=5>So far, Humulin has not shown clinical advantages over animal insulin</FONT> except in the very rare cases</STRONG> in which diabetics develop insulin resistance due to formation of antibodies, <STRONG><FONT size=5>Dr. Miller said. </FONT></STRONG>

The F.D.A., in announcing its approval, said that ''any change in insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision'' in keeping with the general warning to diabetics about switching insulin made from one species of animal to another.

The decision to switch from animal insulin to Humulin will depend on the discretion of individual physicians, Dr. Miller said.

Already Approved in Britain

The F.D.A.'s action follows by one month approval by British officials of Humulin for use in Britain. The reason for the speedy action in the United States, despite the newness of the product, was attributed to ''the vast amount of prior experience with the animal insulins, which are very closely related to'' Humulin, Dr. Miller said.

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Last edited by SSRIAdmin on January 23rd, 2007, 1:48 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

January 23rd, 2007, 1:08 am #3

<EM>"Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, <STRONG><FONT size=5>was an F.D.A. official from 1979 to 1994</FONT></STRONG>. </EM>Barron's<EM> selected his most recent book, "The Frankenfood Myth," one of the 25 Best Books of 2004"&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <STRONG>[in whose opinion?]</STRONG></EM>

<EM></EM>&nbsp;

<EM>http://www.tcsdaily.com/article.aspx?id=011807B</EM>

"<STRONG><FONT size=5>Crazy Lawyering, Crazy Journalism
</FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;
&nbsp;By Dr. Henry I. Miller&nbsp; 22 Jan 2007&nbsp;
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
Would you try to review a 700-page book after reading a single paragraph? Of course not - but major newspapers have done the equivalent, by publishing sensational and censorious articles about defendants in civil litigation that are based on selective leaks from lawyers. Unethical lawyering combined with shoddy journalism threatens many sectors of the economy, especially those that commonly face costly lawsuits alleging torts -- the drug, chemical, automobile and financial sectors, among others.

An egregious example occurred recently when a lawyer who represents mentally ill patients violated a gag order by leaking to various news outlets documents related to litigation over damages allegedly caused by Eli Lilly Company's anti-psychotic drug, Zyprexa. Based on information that was obviously incomplete and out of context, the New York Times made outrageous - and often misleading - allegations in news articles and editorials.

Lawyers owe their clients zealous representation, to be sure, but that is not the same as conducting an ideological vendetta in the media or attempting to poison the jury pool by trying a case in the newspapers and on National Public Radio. James B. Gottstein, the lawyer who leaked selected documents concerning the Zyprexa litigation to the New York Times and other media outlets, certainly appears to fall into the former category. He admits to conducting a "campaign against forced (court ordered) psychiatric drugging and electroshock around the country," because "the massive amounts of forced drugging in this country, amounting to probably at least a million cases a year, is resulting in decreased, rather than increased, public safety; causing an almost unimaginable amount of physical harm, including death; [sic] turning many patients into drooling zombies." The culprits? "In large part, this state of affairs has been created by the lies told by the manufacturers of psychiatric drugs . . ."

<STRONG>Mr. Gottstein appears to think he qualifies as a mental health expert because he has experienced psychotic episodes intermittently for a quarter-century.</STRONG> (See his autobiographical information at http://akmhcweb.org/recovery/jgrec.htm.) I think he needs to have his medications adjusted.

Within the past month, two federal judges independently have harshly condemned both the underhanded manner of Mr. Gottstein's obtaining of the documents and his dissemination of them, which violated a court-issued gag order. Another jurist, Judge Jack B. Weinstein, who is presiding over the consolidated federal cases in the Zyprexa litigation, wrote this about the need to prevent unauthorized leaks: "First, the cost and time to explain a single document taken out of context by a plaintiff's lawyer creates an incentive not to prepare memoranda. Second, what appears damning may, in context after difficult proof, be shown to be neutral or even favorable to the defendant." My own experience as an expert witness (in other litigation) corroborates Judge Weinstein's observations.

Access only to documents that argue one side of the case has not deterred the Times from repeated, vicious attacks on Lilly and Zyprexa, a drug widely prescribed and highly regarded by psychiatrists. In spite of relatively frequent side effects - the most common of which are sleepiness, weight gain and dry mouth - the drug has been administered to almost 20 million seriously ill patients in 84 countries. Many psychiatrists consider it a wonder drug for two of the most debilitating mental illnesses: schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

The Times (and other papers that subscribe to its news service) accuses Lilly of promoting Zyprexa for not yet approved, or "off-label," uses, but the F.D.A. - which carefully monitors and takes a dim view of such violations of federal regulations - has never issued a warning to the company about this.

Without access to the complete database related to the litigation, I cannot judge the merits of the other accusations against Lilly and Zyprexa. However, the Times' call for Lilly's protestations of innocence regarding promotion of off-label uses "to be tested in Congressional hearings that should focus on how well the industry complies with existing laws and how effectively the F.D.A. regulates the industry's marketing materials" is clearly disingenuous. The Times knows that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and influential committee chairmen such as Senator Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.), Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) and John Dingell (D-Mich.) have long been antagonistic to the pharmaceutical industry, and that such hearings would be no more than a witch hunt.

<EM>Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, was an F.D.A. official from 1979 to 1994. Barron's selected his most recent book, "The Frankenfood Myth," one of the 25 Best Books of 2004</EM>."
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

January 23rd, 2007, 1:19 am #4

<EM>"Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, <STRONG><FONT size=5>was an F.D.A. official from 1979 to 1994</FONT></STRONG>. </EM>Barron's<EM> selected his most recent book, "The Frankenfood Myth," one of the 25 Best Books of 2004"&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <STRONG>[in whose opinion?]</STRONG></EM>

<EM></EM>&nbsp;

<EM>http://www.tcsdaily.com/article.aspx?id=011807B</EM>

"<STRONG><FONT size=5>Crazy Lawyering, Crazy Journalism
</FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;
&nbsp;By Dr. Henry I. Miller&nbsp; 22 Jan 2007&nbsp;
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
Would you try to review a 700-page book after reading a single paragraph? Of course not - but major newspapers have done the equivalent, by publishing sensational and censorious articles about defendants in civil litigation that are based on selective leaks from lawyers. Unethical lawyering combined with shoddy journalism threatens many sectors of the economy, especially those that commonly face costly lawsuits alleging torts -- the drug, chemical, automobile and financial sectors, among others.

An egregious example occurred recently when a lawyer who represents mentally ill patients violated a gag order by leaking to various news outlets documents related to litigation over damages allegedly caused by Eli Lilly Company's anti-psychotic drug, Zyprexa. Based on information that was obviously incomplete and out of context, the New York Times made outrageous - and often misleading - allegations in news articles and editorials.

Lawyers owe their clients zealous representation, to be sure, but that is not the same as conducting an ideological vendetta in the media or attempting to poison the jury pool by trying a case in the newspapers and on National Public Radio. James B. Gottstein, the lawyer who leaked selected documents concerning the Zyprexa litigation to the New York Times and other media outlets, certainly appears to fall into the former category. He admits to conducting a "campaign against forced (court ordered) psychiatric drugging and electroshock around the country," because "the massive amounts of forced drugging in this country, amounting to probably at least a million cases a year, is resulting in decreased, rather than increased, public safety; causing an almost unimaginable amount of physical harm, including death; [sic] turning many patients into drooling zombies." The culprits? "In large part, this state of affairs has been created by the lies told by the manufacturers of psychiatric drugs . . ."

<STRONG>Mr. Gottstein appears to think he qualifies as a mental health expert because he has experienced psychotic episodes intermittently for a quarter-century.</STRONG> (See his autobiographical information at http://akmhcweb.org/recovery/jgrec.htm.) I think he needs to have his medications adjusted.

Within the past month, two federal judges independently have harshly condemned both the underhanded manner of Mr. Gottstein's obtaining of the documents and his dissemination of them, which violated a court-issued gag order. Another jurist, Judge Jack B. Weinstein, who is presiding over the consolidated federal cases in the Zyprexa litigation, wrote this about the need to prevent unauthorized leaks: "First, the cost and time to explain a single document taken out of context by a plaintiff's lawyer creates an incentive not to prepare memoranda. Second, what appears damning may, in context after difficult proof, be shown to be neutral or even favorable to the defendant." My own experience as an expert witness (in other litigation) corroborates Judge Weinstein's observations.

Access only to documents that argue one side of the case has not deterred the Times from repeated, vicious attacks on Lilly and Zyprexa, a drug widely prescribed and highly regarded by psychiatrists. In spite of relatively frequent side effects - the most common of which are sleepiness, weight gain and dry mouth - the drug has been administered to almost 20 million seriously ill patients in 84 countries. Many psychiatrists consider it a wonder drug for two of the most debilitating mental illnesses: schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

The Times (and other papers that subscribe to its news service) accuses Lilly of promoting Zyprexa for not yet approved, or "off-label," uses, but the F.D.A. - which carefully monitors and takes a dim view of such violations of federal regulations - has never issued a warning to the company about this.

Without access to the complete database related to the litigation, I cannot judge the merits of the other accusations against Lilly and Zyprexa. However, the Times' call for Lilly's protestations of innocence regarding promotion of off-label uses "to be tested in Congressional hearings that should focus on how well the industry complies with existing laws and how effectively the F.D.A. regulates the industry's marketing materials" is clearly disingenuous. The Times knows that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and influential committee chairmen such as Senator Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.), Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) and John Dingell (D-Mich.) have long been antagonistic to the pharmaceutical industry, and that such hearings would be no more than a witch hunt.

<EM>Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, was an F.D.A. official from 1979 to 1994. Barron's selected his most recent book, "The Frankenfood Myth," one of the 25 Best Books of 2004</EM>."
(comment on Peter Rost's site):

http://peterrost.blogspot.com/2006/05/f ... ished.html

"What has happened with Plan B --the undermining/removal of key evaluators to prevent a drug from being marketed—is the exact opposite of what happened with the approval of rDNA insulin. Addressing this in his book “Too Profitable to Cure,” Brent Hoadley has written:

The FDA approved the new process for making rDNA insulin in 1982, along with the resulting product—human insulin. At the time, the approval process for new drugs, from application to approval, was completed in approximately two years.

Remarkably, rDNA insulin garnered FDA approval in only five months, despite the fact that the process was entirely new and without precedent for evaluation.

Fortunately for the FDA and Eli Lilly, <STRONG>Henry I. Miller10 had come to the agency from the new biotech industry. A self-proclaimed authority in this developing area, </STRONG>Miller, who was only a division head, was initially stymied in his efforts to garner approval for Lilly’s genetically engineered insulin. His boss, the agency head, had concerns about this new product and methodology, especially since long-term safety studies were unavailable. Miller recently admitted how, when the agency head went on vacation, he convinced the acting head to sign off on the approval process, and expeditiously rubber-stamped the approval.

Lilly’s approval for Humulin ranks eighth on the FDA list of ten fastest drug approvals. All the drugs that have received speedier approval were products of “fast-tracking”—a procedure the government implemented 10 to 14 years after the advent of human insulin."


&nbsp;
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

January 23rd, 2007, 1:32 am #5

<EM>"Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, <STRONG><FONT size=5>was an F.D.A. official from 1979 to 1994</FONT></STRONG>. </EM>Barron's<EM> selected his most recent book, "The Frankenfood Myth," one of the 25 Best Books of 2004"&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <STRONG>[in whose opinion?]</STRONG></EM>

<EM></EM>&nbsp;

<EM>http://www.tcsdaily.com/article.aspx?id=011807B</EM>

"<STRONG><FONT size=5>Crazy Lawyering, Crazy Journalism
</FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;
&nbsp;By Dr. Henry I. Miller&nbsp; 22 Jan 2007&nbsp;
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
Would you try to review a 700-page book after reading a single paragraph? Of course not - but major newspapers have done the equivalent, by publishing sensational and censorious articles about defendants in civil litigation that are based on selective leaks from lawyers. Unethical lawyering combined with shoddy journalism threatens many sectors of the economy, especially those that commonly face costly lawsuits alleging torts -- the drug, chemical, automobile and financial sectors, among others.

An egregious example occurred recently when a lawyer who represents mentally ill patients violated a gag order by leaking to various news outlets documents related to litigation over damages allegedly caused by Eli Lilly Company's anti-psychotic drug, Zyprexa. Based on information that was obviously incomplete and out of context, the New York Times made outrageous - and often misleading - allegations in news articles and editorials.

Lawyers owe their clients zealous representation, to be sure, but that is not the same as conducting an ideological vendetta in the media or attempting to poison the jury pool by trying a case in the newspapers and on National Public Radio. James B. Gottstein, the lawyer who leaked selected documents concerning the Zyprexa litigation to the New York Times and other media outlets, certainly appears to fall into the former category. He admits to conducting a "campaign against forced (court ordered) psychiatric drugging and electroshock around the country," because "the massive amounts of forced drugging in this country, amounting to probably at least a million cases a year, is resulting in decreased, rather than increased, public safety; causing an almost unimaginable amount of physical harm, including death; [sic] turning many patients into drooling zombies." The culprits? "In large part, this state of affairs has been created by the lies told by the manufacturers of psychiatric drugs . . ."

<STRONG>Mr. Gottstein appears to think he qualifies as a mental health expert because he has experienced psychotic episodes intermittently for a quarter-century.</STRONG> (See his autobiographical information at http://akmhcweb.org/recovery/jgrec.htm.) I think he needs to have his medications adjusted.

Within the past month, two federal judges independently have harshly condemned both the underhanded manner of Mr. Gottstein's obtaining of the documents and his dissemination of them, which violated a court-issued gag order. Another jurist, Judge Jack B. Weinstein, who is presiding over the consolidated federal cases in the Zyprexa litigation, wrote this about the need to prevent unauthorized leaks: "First, the cost and time to explain a single document taken out of context by a plaintiff's lawyer creates an incentive not to prepare memoranda. Second, what appears damning may, in context after difficult proof, be shown to be neutral or even favorable to the defendant." My own experience as an expert witness (in other litigation) corroborates Judge Weinstein's observations.

Access only to documents that argue one side of the case has not deterred the Times from repeated, vicious attacks on Lilly and Zyprexa, a drug widely prescribed and highly regarded by psychiatrists. In spite of relatively frequent side effects - the most common of which are sleepiness, weight gain and dry mouth - the drug has been administered to almost 20 million seriously ill patients in 84 countries. Many psychiatrists consider it a wonder drug for two of the most debilitating mental illnesses: schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

The Times (and other papers that subscribe to its news service) accuses Lilly of promoting Zyprexa for not yet approved, or "off-label," uses, but the F.D.A. - which carefully monitors and takes a dim view of such violations of federal regulations - has never issued a warning to the company about this.

Without access to the complete database related to the litigation, I cannot judge the merits of the other accusations against Lilly and Zyprexa. However, the Times' call for Lilly's protestations of innocence regarding promotion of off-label uses "to be tested in Congressional hearings that should focus on how well the industry complies with existing laws and how effectively the F.D.A. regulates the industry's marketing materials" is clearly disingenuous. The Times knows that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and influential committee chairmen such as Senator Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.), Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) and John Dingell (D-Mich.) have long been antagonistic to the pharmaceutical industry, and that such hearings would be no more than a witch hunt.

<EM>Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, was an F.D.A. official from 1979 to 1994. Barron's selected his most recent book, "The Frankenfood Myth," one of the 25 Best Books of 2004</EM>."
"DISTINGUISHED"?&nbsp;

Appears that&nbsp; "DR" Henry Miller is responsible for a great deal of pharmaceutical/FDA corruption and the deaths in its wake?

http://phpab.org/Distinguished%20Fellows/Miller.htm

<FONT face=Arial size=4>"...Dr. Miller was at the FDA from 1979-1994, where he served in a number of posts involved with both product review and policymaking.&nbsp; He was the reviewer for the first biopharmaceutical, human insulin (Humulin®, Eli Lilly and Co.), which was approved in record time. </FONT>

<FONT face=Arial size=4>During his government service, Dr. Miller wrote and lectured frequently on regulatory issues and requirements, and participated frequently on various expert and policy panels as a representative of the FDA or the US government.&nbsp; </FONT>

<FONT face=Arial size=4>As the FDA’s contact person for the Securities and Exchange Commission, he <STRONG>reviewed the accuracy of claims made by companies in their prospectuses about the likelihood and timing of drug approval</STRONG>s..."</FONT>
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

January 23rd, 2007, 1:43 am #6

<EM>"Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, <STRONG><FONT size=5>was an F.D.A. official from 1979 to 1994</FONT></STRONG>. </EM>Barron's<EM> selected his most recent book, "The Frankenfood Myth," one of the 25 Best Books of 2004"&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <STRONG>[in whose opinion?]</STRONG></EM>

<EM></EM>&nbsp;

<EM>http://www.tcsdaily.com/article.aspx?id=011807B</EM>

"<STRONG><FONT size=5>Crazy Lawyering, Crazy Journalism
</FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;
&nbsp;By Dr. Henry I. Miller&nbsp; 22 Jan 2007&nbsp;
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
Would you try to review a 700-page book after reading a single paragraph? Of course not - but major newspapers have done the equivalent, by publishing sensational and censorious articles about defendants in civil litigation that are based on selective leaks from lawyers. Unethical lawyering combined with shoddy journalism threatens many sectors of the economy, especially those that commonly face costly lawsuits alleging torts -- the drug, chemical, automobile and financial sectors, among others.

An egregious example occurred recently when a lawyer who represents mentally ill patients violated a gag order by leaking to various news outlets documents related to litigation over damages allegedly caused by Eli Lilly Company's anti-psychotic drug, Zyprexa. Based on information that was obviously incomplete and out of context, the New York Times made outrageous - and often misleading - allegations in news articles and editorials.

Lawyers owe their clients zealous representation, to be sure, but that is not the same as conducting an ideological vendetta in the media or attempting to poison the jury pool by trying a case in the newspapers and on National Public Radio. James B. Gottstein, the lawyer who leaked selected documents concerning the Zyprexa litigation to the New York Times and other media outlets, certainly appears to fall into the former category. He admits to conducting a "campaign against forced (court ordered) psychiatric drugging and electroshock around the country," because "the massive amounts of forced drugging in this country, amounting to probably at least a million cases a year, is resulting in decreased, rather than increased, public safety; causing an almost unimaginable amount of physical harm, including death; [sic] turning many patients into drooling zombies." The culprits? "In large part, this state of affairs has been created by the lies told by the manufacturers of psychiatric drugs . . ."

<STRONG>Mr. Gottstein appears to think he qualifies as a mental health expert because he has experienced psychotic episodes intermittently for a quarter-century.</STRONG> (See his autobiographical information at http://akmhcweb.org/recovery/jgrec.htm.) I think he needs to have his medications adjusted.

Within the past month, two federal judges independently have harshly condemned both the underhanded manner of Mr. Gottstein's obtaining of the documents and his dissemination of them, which violated a court-issued gag order. Another jurist, Judge Jack B. Weinstein, who is presiding over the consolidated federal cases in the Zyprexa litigation, wrote this about the need to prevent unauthorized leaks: "First, the cost and time to explain a single document taken out of context by a plaintiff's lawyer creates an incentive not to prepare memoranda. Second, what appears damning may, in context after difficult proof, be shown to be neutral or even favorable to the defendant." My own experience as an expert witness (in other litigation) corroborates Judge Weinstein's observations.

Access only to documents that argue one side of the case has not deterred the Times from repeated, vicious attacks on Lilly and Zyprexa, a drug widely prescribed and highly regarded by psychiatrists. In spite of relatively frequent side effects - the most common of which are sleepiness, weight gain and dry mouth - the drug has been administered to almost 20 million seriously ill patients in 84 countries. Many psychiatrists consider it a wonder drug for two of the most debilitating mental illnesses: schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

The Times (and other papers that subscribe to its news service) accuses Lilly of promoting Zyprexa for not yet approved, or "off-label," uses, but the F.D.A. - which carefully monitors and takes a dim view of such violations of federal regulations - has never issued a warning to the company about this.

Without access to the complete database related to the litigation, I cannot judge the merits of the other accusations against Lilly and Zyprexa. However, the Times' call for Lilly's protestations of innocence regarding promotion of off-label uses "to be tested in Congressional hearings that should focus on how well the industry complies with existing laws and how effectively the F.D.A. regulates the industry's marketing materials" is clearly disingenuous. The Times knows that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and influential committee chairmen such as Senator Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.), Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) and John Dingell (D-Mich.) have long been antagonistic to the pharmaceutical industry, and that such hearings would be no more than a witch hunt.

<EM>Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, was an F.D.A. official from 1979 to 1994. Barron's selected his most recent book, "The Frankenfood Myth," one of the 25 Best Books of 2004</EM>."
Which is why the FDA end up HAVING to ban lots of the drugs they 'approve' because - well, ask "Dr" Miller who sorted that kind of thing out - because the FDA protect ECONOMY and in their case its the PHARMACEUTICAL ECONOMY.&nbsp; Ask "Dr" &nbsp;Henry Miller again, the man who was supposed to protect the people from harm as&nbsp; a drug regulator but preferred to protect THE ECONOMY rather than the PEOPLE - and I bet he didn't do that for NOTHING huh?

&nbsp;

<EM>http://www.tcsdaily.com/article.aspx?id=011807B</EM>

"<STRONG><FONT size=5>Crazy Lawyering, Crazy Journalism
</FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;
&nbsp;By Dr. Henry I. Miller&nbsp; 22 Jan 2007&nbsp;
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
Would you try to review a 700-page book after reading a single paragraph? Of course not - but major newspapers have done the equivalent, by publishing sensational and censorious articles about defendants in civil litigation that are based on selective leaks from lawyers. <STRONG>Unethical lawyering combined with shoddy journalism threatens <FONT size=6>many sectors of the economy</FONT>, </STRONG>especially those that commonly face costly lawsuits alleging torts -- the drug, chemical, automobile and financial sectors, among others. .."
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

January 23rd, 2007, 1:52 am #7

<EM>"Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, <STRONG><FONT size=5>was an F.D.A. official from 1979 to 1994</FONT></STRONG>. </EM>Barron's<EM> selected his most recent book, "The Frankenfood Myth," one of the 25 Best Books of 2004"&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <STRONG>[in whose opinion?]</STRONG></EM>

<EM></EM>&nbsp;

<EM>http://www.tcsdaily.com/article.aspx?id=011807B</EM>

"<STRONG><FONT size=5>Crazy Lawyering, Crazy Journalism
</FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;
&nbsp;By Dr. Henry I. Miller&nbsp; 22 Jan 2007&nbsp;
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
Would you try to review a 700-page book after reading a single paragraph? Of course not - but major newspapers have done the equivalent, by publishing sensational and censorious articles about defendants in civil litigation that are based on selective leaks from lawyers. Unethical lawyering combined with shoddy journalism threatens many sectors of the economy, especially those that commonly face costly lawsuits alleging torts -- the drug, chemical, automobile and financial sectors, among others.

An egregious example occurred recently when a lawyer who represents mentally ill patients violated a gag order by leaking to various news outlets documents related to litigation over damages allegedly caused by Eli Lilly Company's anti-psychotic drug, Zyprexa. Based on information that was obviously incomplete and out of context, the New York Times made outrageous - and often misleading - allegations in news articles and editorials.

Lawyers owe their clients zealous representation, to be sure, but that is not the same as conducting an ideological vendetta in the media or attempting to poison the jury pool by trying a case in the newspapers and on National Public Radio. James B. Gottstein, the lawyer who leaked selected documents concerning the Zyprexa litigation to the New York Times and other media outlets, certainly appears to fall into the former category. He admits to conducting a "campaign against forced (court ordered) psychiatric drugging and electroshock around the country," because "the massive amounts of forced drugging in this country, amounting to probably at least a million cases a year, is resulting in decreased, rather than increased, public safety; causing an almost unimaginable amount of physical harm, including death; [sic] turning many patients into drooling zombies." The culprits? "In large part, this state of affairs has been created by the lies told by the manufacturers of psychiatric drugs . . ."

<STRONG>Mr. Gottstein appears to think he qualifies as a mental health expert because he has experienced psychotic episodes intermittently for a quarter-century.</STRONG> (See his autobiographical information at http://akmhcweb.org/recovery/jgrec.htm.) I think he needs to have his medications adjusted.

Within the past month, two federal judges independently have harshly condemned both the underhanded manner of Mr. Gottstein's obtaining of the documents and his dissemination of them, which violated a court-issued gag order. Another jurist, Judge Jack B. Weinstein, who is presiding over the consolidated federal cases in the Zyprexa litigation, wrote this about the need to prevent unauthorized leaks: "First, the cost and time to explain a single document taken out of context by a plaintiff's lawyer creates an incentive not to prepare memoranda. Second, what appears damning may, in context after difficult proof, be shown to be neutral or even favorable to the defendant." My own experience as an expert witness (in other litigation) corroborates Judge Weinstein's observations.

Access only to documents that argue one side of the case has not deterred the Times from repeated, vicious attacks on Lilly and Zyprexa, a drug widely prescribed and highly regarded by psychiatrists. In spite of relatively frequent side effects - the most common of which are sleepiness, weight gain and dry mouth - the drug has been administered to almost 20 million seriously ill patients in 84 countries. Many psychiatrists consider it a wonder drug for two of the most debilitating mental illnesses: schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

The Times (and other papers that subscribe to its news service) accuses Lilly of promoting Zyprexa for not yet approved, or "off-label," uses, but the F.D.A. - which carefully monitors and takes a dim view of such violations of federal regulations - has never issued a warning to the company about this.

Without access to the complete database related to the litigation, I cannot judge the merits of the other accusations against Lilly and Zyprexa. However, the Times' call for Lilly's protestations of innocence regarding promotion of off-label uses "to be tested in Congressional hearings that should focus on how well the industry complies with existing laws and how effectively the F.D.A. regulates the industry's marketing materials" is clearly disingenuous. The Times knows that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and influential committee chairmen such as Senator Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.), Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) and John Dingell (D-Mich.) have long been antagonistic to the pharmaceutical industry, and that such hearings would be no more than a witch hunt.

<EM>Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, was an F.D.A. official from 1979 to 1994. Barron's selected his most recent book, "The Frankenfood Myth," one of the 25 Best Books of 2004</EM>."
You are a fraud, you have your OWN interests at heart. HOW MANY DEATHS ARE YOU responsible for while you were protecting industry while being paid to regulate the safety of drugs?

Doctor in name maybe, but not in action, Mr Miller.
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

January 23rd, 2007, 2:40 pm #8

<EM>"Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, <STRONG><FONT size=5>was an F.D.A. official from 1979 to 1994</FONT></STRONG>. </EM>Barron's<EM> selected his most recent book, "The Frankenfood Myth," one of the 25 Best Books of 2004"&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <STRONG>[in whose opinion?]</STRONG></EM>

<EM></EM>&nbsp;

<EM>http://www.tcsdaily.com/article.aspx?id=011807B</EM>

"<STRONG><FONT size=5>Crazy Lawyering, Crazy Journalism
</FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;
&nbsp;By Dr. Henry I. Miller&nbsp; 22 Jan 2007&nbsp;
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
Would you try to review a 700-page book after reading a single paragraph? Of course not - but major newspapers have done the equivalent, by publishing sensational and censorious articles about defendants in civil litigation that are based on selective leaks from lawyers. Unethical lawyering combined with shoddy journalism threatens many sectors of the economy, especially those that commonly face costly lawsuits alleging torts -- the drug, chemical, automobile and financial sectors, among others.

An egregious example occurred recently when a lawyer who represents mentally ill patients violated a gag order by leaking to various news outlets documents related to litigation over damages allegedly caused by Eli Lilly Company's anti-psychotic drug, Zyprexa. Based on information that was obviously incomplete and out of context, the New York Times made outrageous - and often misleading - allegations in news articles and editorials.

Lawyers owe their clients zealous representation, to be sure, but that is not the same as conducting an ideological vendetta in the media or attempting to poison the jury pool by trying a case in the newspapers and on National Public Radio. James B. Gottstein, the lawyer who leaked selected documents concerning the Zyprexa litigation to the New York Times and other media outlets, certainly appears to fall into the former category. He admits to conducting a "campaign against forced (court ordered) psychiatric drugging and electroshock around the country," because "the massive amounts of forced drugging in this country, amounting to probably at least a million cases a year, is resulting in decreased, rather than increased, public safety; causing an almost unimaginable amount of physical harm, including death; [sic] turning many patients into drooling zombies." The culprits? "In large part, this state of affairs has been created by the lies told by the manufacturers of psychiatric drugs . . ."

<STRONG>Mr. Gottstein appears to think he qualifies as a mental health expert because he has experienced psychotic episodes intermittently for a quarter-century.</STRONG> (See his autobiographical information at http://akmhcweb.org/recovery/jgrec.htm.) I think he needs to have his medications adjusted.

Within the past month, two federal judges independently have harshly condemned both the underhanded manner of Mr. Gottstein's obtaining of the documents and his dissemination of them, which violated a court-issued gag order. Another jurist, Judge Jack B. Weinstein, who is presiding over the consolidated federal cases in the Zyprexa litigation, wrote this about the need to prevent unauthorized leaks: "First, the cost and time to explain a single document taken out of context by a plaintiff's lawyer creates an incentive not to prepare memoranda. Second, what appears damning may, in context after difficult proof, be shown to be neutral or even favorable to the defendant." My own experience as an expert witness (in other litigation) corroborates Judge Weinstein's observations.

Access only to documents that argue one side of the case has not deterred the Times from repeated, vicious attacks on Lilly and Zyprexa, a drug widely prescribed and highly regarded by psychiatrists. In spite of relatively frequent side effects - the most common of which are sleepiness, weight gain and dry mouth - the drug has been administered to almost 20 million seriously ill patients in 84 countries. Many psychiatrists consider it a wonder drug for two of the most debilitating mental illnesses: schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

The Times (and other papers that subscribe to its news service) accuses Lilly of promoting Zyprexa for not yet approved, or "off-label," uses, but the F.D.A. - which carefully monitors and takes a dim view of such violations of federal regulations - has never issued a warning to the company about this.

Without access to the complete database related to the litigation, I cannot judge the merits of the other accusations against Lilly and Zyprexa. However, the Times' call for Lilly's protestations of innocence regarding promotion of off-label uses "to be tested in Congressional hearings that should focus on how well the industry complies with existing laws and how effectively the F.D.A. regulates the industry's marketing materials" is clearly disingenuous. The Times knows that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and influential committee chairmen such as Senator Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.), Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) and John Dingell (D-Mich.) have long been antagonistic to the pharmaceutical industry, and that such hearings would be no more than a witch hunt.

<EM>Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, was an F.D.A. official from 1979 to 1994. Barron's selected his most recent book, "The Frankenfood Myth," one of the 25 Best Books of 2004</EM>."
http://article.nationalreview.com/?q=YW ... TcxMzNjY2Y=

"...<STRONG>What we need is not "better science"</STRONG> or new taxes on drug development but better management by senior officials at the FDA and discipline in the ranks. For example, in just the past few years, FDA officials have arbitrarily and unexpectedly directed clinical investigators to begin trials at inappropriately low dosages; they have limited approval of Phase 1 studies only to single-dose, instead of dose-ranging, studies; they have demanded unnecessary, invasive procedures on patients; they have required that <STRONG>foreign trials be completed and the results submitted </STRONG>before the U.S. trials could begin; <STRONG>they have introduced questionable warnings on labels; and they have required an excessive number of post-marketing studies..."
</STRONG>

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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

January 23rd, 2007, 4:46 pm #9

<EM>"Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, <STRONG><FONT size=5>was an F.D.A. official from 1979 to 1994</FONT></STRONG>. </EM>Barron's<EM> selected his most recent book, "The Frankenfood Myth," one of the 25 Best Books of 2004"&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; <STRONG>[in whose opinion?]</STRONG></EM>

<EM></EM>&nbsp;

<EM>http://www.tcsdaily.com/article.aspx?id=011807B</EM>

"<STRONG><FONT size=5>Crazy Lawyering, Crazy Journalism
</FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;
&nbsp;By Dr. Henry I. Miller&nbsp; 22 Jan 2007&nbsp;
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
Would you try to review a 700-page book after reading a single paragraph? Of course not - but major newspapers have done the equivalent, by publishing sensational and censorious articles about defendants in civil litigation that are based on selective leaks from lawyers. Unethical lawyering combined with shoddy journalism threatens many sectors of the economy, especially those that commonly face costly lawsuits alleging torts -- the drug, chemical, automobile and financial sectors, among others.

An egregious example occurred recently when a lawyer who represents mentally ill patients violated a gag order by leaking to various news outlets documents related to litigation over damages allegedly caused by Eli Lilly Company's anti-psychotic drug, Zyprexa. Based on information that was obviously incomplete and out of context, the New York Times made outrageous - and often misleading - allegations in news articles and editorials.

Lawyers owe their clients zealous representation, to be sure, but that is not the same as conducting an ideological vendetta in the media or attempting to poison the jury pool by trying a case in the newspapers and on National Public Radio. James B. Gottstein, the lawyer who leaked selected documents concerning the Zyprexa litigation to the New York Times and other media outlets, certainly appears to fall into the former category. He admits to conducting a "campaign against forced (court ordered) psychiatric drugging and electroshock around the country," because "the massive amounts of forced drugging in this country, amounting to probably at least a million cases a year, is resulting in decreased, rather than increased, public safety; causing an almost unimaginable amount of physical harm, including death; [sic] turning many patients into drooling zombies." The culprits? "In large part, this state of affairs has been created by the lies told by the manufacturers of psychiatric drugs . . ."

<STRONG>Mr. Gottstein appears to think he qualifies as a mental health expert because he has experienced psychotic episodes intermittently for a quarter-century.</STRONG> (See his autobiographical information at http://akmhcweb.org/recovery/jgrec.htm.) I think he needs to have his medications adjusted.

Within the past month, two federal judges independently have harshly condemned both the underhanded manner of Mr. Gottstein's obtaining of the documents and his dissemination of them, which violated a court-issued gag order. Another jurist, Judge Jack B. Weinstein, who is presiding over the consolidated federal cases in the Zyprexa litigation, wrote this about the need to prevent unauthorized leaks: "First, the cost and time to explain a single document taken out of context by a plaintiff's lawyer creates an incentive not to prepare memoranda. Second, what appears damning may, in context after difficult proof, be shown to be neutral or even favorable to the defendant." My own experience as an expert witness (in other litigation) corroborates Judge Weinstein's observations.

Access only to documents that argue one side of the case has not deterred the Times from repeated, vicious attacks on Lilly and Zyprexa, a drug widely prescribed and highly regarded by psychiatrists. In spite of relatively frequent side effects - the most common of which are sleepiness, weight gain and dry mouth - the drug has been administered to almost 20 million seriously ill patients in 84 countries. Many psychiatrists consider it a wonder drug for two of the most debilitating mental illnesses: schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

The Times (and other papers that subscribe to its news service) accuses Lilly of promoting Zyprexa for not yet approved, or "off-label," uses, but the F.D.A. - which carefully monitors and takes a dim view of such violations of federal regulations - has never issued a warning to the company about this.

Without access to the complete database related to the litigation, I cannot judge the merits of the other accusations against Lilly and Zyprexa. However, the Times' call for Lilly's protestations of innocence regarding promotion of off-label uses "to be tested in Congressional hearings that should focus on how well the industry complies with existing laws and how effectively the F.D.A. regulates the industry's marketing materials" is clearly disingenuous. The Times knows that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and influential committee chairmen such as Senator Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.), Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) and John Dingell (D-Mich.) have long been antagonistic to the pharmaceutical industry, and that such hearings would be no more than a witch hunt.

<EM>Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow at the Hoover Institution, was an F.D.A. official from 1979 to 1994. Barron's selected his most recent book, "The Frankenfood Myth," one of the 25 Best Books of 2004</EM>."
<SPAN class=articledate>http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/s ... 230800.asp</SPAN>

<SPAN class=articledate>March 23, 2005, 8:00 a.m.</SPAN>
<STRONG><FONT size=5><SPAN class=articletitle>Let’s Clear the Air</SPAN>
<SPAN class=articlesubtitle>The sky is not falling.</SPAN></FONT></STRONG>

<SPAN class=articlebyline>By Sandy Szwarc & <STRONG><FONT size=5>Henry I. Miller</FONT></STRONG></SPAN><STRONG><FONT size=5> </FONT></STRONG>

<SPAN class=drop>G</SPAN>overnment regulation is sometimes like the old shell game, in which trying to guess where the pea is can be devilishly difficult. An example is the nation's first set of regulations to control mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants, announced last week by the EPA. The culmination of years of squabbling over different approaches, the rule imposes nationwide caps that will reduce emissions 70 percent by 2018, while conferring on individual power plants the flexibility to adopt new technology as it becomes available and to determine the best method for their facility to meet the new limits.

Environmental groups had favored a plan that would more immediately institute limits on each power plant, despite the fact that the necessary technologies are still experimental and cannot reliably and consistently reduce mercury emissions for the 1,032 different plants across the country. Environmentalists' main objection to the "cap-and-trade" plan announced by EPA — which allows facilities to trade and sell their emissions allowances while technology is being implemented — ostensibly is concern that it could create ecological "hot spots" of mercury in parts of the country. But that won't happen, according to <STRONG><FONT size=4><EM>an analysis by the Electric Power Research Institute</EM>, </FONT></STRONG>a nonprofit energy and environmental research firm based in Palo Alto, Calif., <STRONG><FONT size=4>because most mercury comes from sources other than power plants, which contribute little to the areas of highest deposition in the United States</FONT></STRONG>. In fact, the EPA's plan produced greater overall reductions than the environmentalists' plan.

No matter. Environmentalists and some members of Congress are alleging that the EPA's new regulations don't go far enough and will put thousands of unborn babies and children at risk of neurological damage because of higher methylmercury levels in fish. Their rationale is that the release of mercury from coal-burning power plants contaminates our seafood.

Here's where the shell game comes in. Emissions from U.S. incinerators and other sources have been <STRONG>declining</STRONG> for decades, and the nation's power plants now contribute less than one percent of the global atmospheric mercury. <FONT size=4><FONT size=3>In fact, the U.S. discontinued mercury mining altogether in 1991,</FONT><STRONG> and domestic use of mercury fell by more than 75 percent just between 1988 and 1996. Our air is cleaner than ever. </STRONG></FONT>

Moreover, there is no proof that the amount of methylmercury in fish Americans eat is dangerous. Despite advisories from the government for pregnant women and children to limit consumption of fish to prevent damage to children's developing nervous systems, <STRONG><FONT size=4>the only cases in the scientific literature of mercury poisoning and subsequent neurological problems from fish were due to an industrial mercury spill in Japan in the 1950s.</FONT></STRONG> They resulted in methylmercury levels in fish 40 to 1,000 times higher than those consumed by Americans.

Methylmercury has always been found naturally in fish and in our bodies, <FONT size=4><STRONG>but the trace levels of human exposure haven't increased in centuries; in fact, they're dropping.</STRONG> </FONT>And research that has followed thousands of pregnant women and their children for nearly 15 years has found no evidence that the amounts of methylmercury in our fish put children or newborn babies at risk. Even among populations eating ten or more times the amounts of fish consumed by Americans, scientists have found no credible evidence of neurotoxicity, let alone brain damage, developmental delays, retardation, or learning disabilities.

The sky-is-falling crowd of activists and government officials remains unconvinced. They persist in warning women that there is real risk in exceeding EPA-established thresholds of methylmercury exposure that were set arbitrarily and with overly conservative safety margins. To determine acceptable levels of methylmercury, the EPA began with an amount at which there was no observed effect at all in the most sensitive of the population with a lifetime of exposure — a level nearly ten times that found in American women — and then added another tenfold safety cushion to that.

The EPA's safety margins are the most restrictive in the world and conflict with those adopted by other U.S. agencies, as well as other agencies around the world. <STRONG><FONT size=4>Even so, tests by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found no American women or child had unsafe levels of mercury in their blood or hair..."</FONT></STRONG>

&nbsp;

http://www.acfnewsource.org/science/mercury_rising.html

"...The FDA found that annually about <STRONG><FONT size=5>630,000 babies in the U.S. are born with high levels of mercury. This means one in six babies are born to mothers who have a mercury level higher than what is considered safe...</FONT></STRONG>

About five years ago, Hightower began to see a growing number of patients complaining about a variety of symptoms that seemed to worsen but had no direct cause. <FONT size=4><STRONG>The symptoms included memory loss, joint pain, difficulty concentrating and aches. Hightower began testing more of her patients for mercury and found that many had levels higher than the reference dose</STRONG></FONT><FONT size=3>...</FONT>

...In November of <STRONG><FONT size=4>2002, </FONT><FONT size=5><FONT size=4>Hightower published a study of 123 patients in a journal called Environmental Health Perspectives</FONT>. </FONT></STRONG>She found 89% of the subjects had blood mercury levels above the EPA reference dose. <FONT size=4><STRONG>In April of 2004, she published “Mercury and Human Health: A Case Study in Science and Politics” with the San Francisco Medical Society</STRONG></FONT>.

Dr. Eliseo Guallar, an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins University in the Bloomberg School of Public Health, is looking at the effects of high levels of mercury exposure on the adult population. <FONT size=4><STRONG>In 2002, Guallar published "Mercury, Fish Oils, And the Risk of Myocardial Infraction" in the New England Journal of Medicine. His research found that higher levels of mercury correlated to a higher likelihood of heart attack and he says confirmed the results of a study published in Finland 10 years prior</STRONG></FONT><FONT size=3>..."</FONT>

&nbsp;

http://www.agiweb.org/gap/legis109/mercury.html

"...Methylmercury is the most toxic form of mercury. It both bioaccumulates (absorbed more quickly than eliminated) and biomagnifies (concentration increases up the food chain). <STRONG><FONT size=4>Methylmercury can cause brain damage, nervous disorders, tremors, vision, and memory loss. Some evidence also links methylmercury to cardiovascular, thyroid, and digestive problems. Methylmercury is most commonly ingested by humans through fish consumption. </FONT></STRONG>Inorganic mercury is less efficiently absorbed by the body than methylmercury, and thus does not tend to cause serious health problems..."

"...On August, <STRONG><FONT size=4>2004,</FONT></STRONG> EPA officials released a major announcement that <STRONG><FONT size=4>mercury contamination in the nation's waters have reached an all-time high</FONT></STRONG>..."

&nbsp;

http://www.flcv.com/amalg6.html

"...While there have been large increases of most neurological and immune conditions among adults over the last 2 decades(574), the incidence of neurotoxic or immune reactive conditions in infants such as autism, schizophrenia, ADD, dyslexia, learning disabilities, etc. have been increasing especially rapidly in recent years (2,409,441,476). A recent report by the

<FONT size=4><STRONG>National Research Council found that 50% of all pregnancies in the U.S. are now resulting in prenatal or postnatal mortality, significant birth defects, developmental neurological or immune conditions, or otherwise chronically unhealthy babies(441). </STRONG></FONT>

<FONT size=4><FONT size=3>Exposure to toxic chemicals or environmental factors appear to be a factor in as much as 28 percent of the 4 million children born each year(441,160), with 1 in 6 having one of the neurological conditions previously listed.&nbsp; </FONT></FONT><FONT size=4><FONT size=3>EPA estimates that over 3 million of these are related to lead or mercury toxicity (2,125,276,409), <STRONG>with approximately 25% of U.S. infants receiving dangerous levels of mercury exposure(276). </STRONG></FONT></FONT>

A recent study found that <STRONG>prenatal Hg</STRONG><EM> [mercury]</EM><STRONG> exposure is correlated with lower scores in neurodevelopmental screening, but more so in the linguistic pathway(32c)</STRONG>. A study at the U.S. <STRONG>CDC found "statistically significant associations" between certain neurologic developmental disorders such as attention deficit disorder(ADD) and autism with exposure to mercury from thimerosal-containing vaccines before the age of 6 months</STRONG>(476), and a <STRONG>followon study using federal vaccine data bases confirmed that autism, speaking disorders, and heart arrest have increased exponentially with increasing exposures to mercury thimerosal-containing vaccines</STRONG>(476b). Thimerosal has also been found to cause hormonal effects(555,413). Prenatal exposure to mercury has also been found to predispose animals <STRONG>and infants to seizures and epilepsy</STRONG>(5,52)..."

<A href="http://www.agiweb.org/gap/legis109/merc ... ></A>&nbsp;

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/artic ... -2,00.html

"...In addition, there's a growing body of research that reveals the extent to which <STRONG><FONT size=4>medium to high levels of exposure to the metal can harm adults as well as children, causing a wide range of ills--including fatigue, tremors, vision disorders and brain, kidney and circulatory damage. All told, "the breadth of the problem has expanded greatly," says biologist David Evers of the BioDiversity Research Institute in Gorham, Maine. "It's far more prevalent and at higher levels than considered even a couple years ago...</FONT></STRONG>"

"...On the ground or especially in the low-oxygen environment of the oceans, mercury is consumed by bacteria that add a bit of carbon to convert it to methylmercury, a metabolically stickier form that stays in the body a long time. That is bad news for the food chain, since every time a bigger animal eats a smaller animal, it consumes a heavy dose of its prey's mercury load. <STRONG><FONT size=4>That's why such large predatory fish as shark, swordfish, mackerel, tilefish and albacore tuna are so heavily contaminated. </FONT></STRONG>Less publicized but still problematic is toxic mercury vapor, which can be odorlessly emitted from factories and dumps where batteries, fluorescent lamps, jewelry, paints, electrical switches and other mercury-containing products are manufactured or discarded....

,,,All that has been known for a while, but the game changer was the recent study of Northeastern songbirds. A group headed by Evers had been worried for some time that mercury's reach was greater than it seemed, <STRONG><FONT size=4>particularly in the Northeast, which is downwind from the power plants of the Midwest and Canada. </FONT></STRONG>Mercury from those plants' smokestacks could find plenty of bacteria in water, leaves and sod <STRONG><FONT size=4>to make the toxic conversion to methylmercury. Netting 178 species of songbirds and testing their blood and feathers, Evers found that all of them were indeed contaminated, some in concentrations exceeding 0.1 parts per million. That doesn't sound like much, but it's a lot higher than it ought to be, and it's surely on the rise. So far, the toxin hasn't disrupted the birds' reproductive cycle, but researchers fear that it will before long. </FONT></STRONG>What's more, if the birds are contaminated, so are other animals that eat the same diet--not to mention predators that eat the birds. Says Evers: "<FONT size=4><STRONG>It creeps up the food chain and continues to biomagnify as it goes."</STRONG>...</FONT>

<FONT size=4>...<FONT size=3>This fall the National Wildlife Federation will release a survey of more than </FONT><STRONG>65 recently published studies showing elevated mercury in more than 40 species</STRONG>, <FONT size=3>many of which had been thought to be in little danger. Some, including common </FONT><STRONG>loons and bald eagles, are already showing signs of behavioral and reproductive changes associated with mercury poisoning.</STRONG></FONT>

<FONT size=4><FONT size=3>Cleaning up the mess is the responsibility of the species that made it, and that job starts with coal.</FONT> <STRONG>The 440 coal-fired power plants in the U.S. produce about 48 tons of mercury a year--40% of the nation's total output, by some estimates</STRONG><FONT size=3>...</FONT></FONT>

<FONT size=4><STRONG>...&nbsp;</STRONG><FONT size=3>But while much of the environmental mercury in the U.S. comes from power plants,</FONT> <STRONG>the other dominant source is chlor-alkali plants, which manufacture chemicals used in soaps, detergents and other products. </STRONG></FONT><FONT size=3>More than 25% of the U.S. total blows in from overseas, particularly from coal-gobbling countries like China. Illinois Senator Barack Obama has proposed two bills to address those problems. One requires the eight chlor-alkali plants in the U.S. that still use mercury to convert to a less toxic alternative by 2012. The other calls for a ban on U.S. exports of mercury starting in 2010--a significant move, since the U.S. sells as much as 300 tons of the metal a year, or 8% of the world's total. More than a dozen state governments across the U.S. are getting ahead of Washington with mercury controls of their own. Foreign governments have also acted.<STRONG><FONT size=4> "Europe, Canada, Australia and Japan have been reducing their use of mercury for five to 10 years,</FONT></STRONG>" says Linda Greer, a member of the EPA's science advisory board..."</FONT>

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http://www.flcv.com/amalg6.html

"...2. Mercury is the most toxic of the toxic metals. Mercury (vapor) is carried by the blood to cells in all organs of the body where it:

(a) is cytotoxic(kills cells) (2,21,27,36,56,147,148,150,160,210,259,295,333/333)

(b) penetrates and damages the blood brain barrier(311), resulting in accumulation of mercury and other toxic substances in the brain(14,20,21b,25,85,99,175,273,301,305,/149,262,274); also accumulates in the motor function areas of the brain and CNS(48,175,291,327,329).

© is neurotoxic(kills brain and nerve cells): damages brain cells and nerve cells (19,27,34,36, 43, 69,70, 147,148,175,207,211,258,273,291,295,327,329,301,303,305,395/39,262,274,303); generates high levels of reactive oxygen species(ROS) and oxidative stress, depletes glutathione and thiols causing increased neurotoxicity from interactions of ROS, glutamate, and dopamine (13,56,98,102, 145,169,170, 184,213,219,250,257,259,286,288,290,291,302,324,326,329,416,424, 442, 496,564,565); kills or inhibits production of brain tubulin cells (66,67,161,166, 207,258,300); inhibits production of neurotransmitters by inhibiting: calcium-dependent neurotransmitter release(372,432), dihydroteridine reductase (27,122,257,333), nitric oxide synthase(259), blocking neurotransmitter amino acids (412), and effecting phenylalanine, serotonin, tyrosine and tryptophan transport to neurons (34,122,126,257,285,288,333,372,374,412/333)

(d) is immunotoxic(damages and inhibits immune T-cells, B-cells, neutrophil function, etc.) (17,27,31,38,44,45,46,60,127,128,129,130,152,155,165,181,226,252,270,285,316,343,355,425,467/272) and induces ANA antibodies and autoimmune disease (38,43,45,59,60,118,181, 234,269,270,313,314,334, 342,343,425, 405)

(e) is nepthrotoxic(toxic to kidneys) (14,20,203,209c,223,254,260,268,334,438)

(f) is endocrine system-disrupting chemical(accumulates in pituitary gland and damages or inhibits pituitary glands hormonal functions at very low levels (9,19,20,25,85,99,105,273,312,327, 348,369/274), adrenal gland function(84,369,381), thyroid gland function (50,212,369,382,459,508-511,35), thymus gland function(513), and disrupts enzyme production processes at very low levels of exposure (9,13,33,35,56,111,194,258,348,355,410-412)

(g) exposure to mercury vapor (or methyl mercury) causes rapid transmittal through the placenta to the fetus (20,22-24,27,38,39,61,112,186,281,287,304,311,338,339,348,361,366,20/ 4,22,37,39, 41,42) and significant developmental effects-much more damage to the fetus than for maternal exposure to inorganic mercury and at lower exposure levels than for organic mercury(287,304,276e,etc.).

(h) reproductive and developmental toxin (2,4,9,10,22,23,24,31,37,38,41,61,105,125, 160,175,275, 281,305, 338,361,367,381,20/4,39,55,149,162,255,308,339,357,540); damages DNA (296,327,272,392,142,38,41,42,35) and inhibits DNA & RNA synthesis (114,175,35/149); damages sperm, lowers sperm counts and reduces motility. (4,37,104.105,159,160,433,35/4,55,162); causes menstrual disturbances (9,27,146); reduces bloods ability to transport oxygen to fetus and transport of essential nutrients including amino acids, glucose, magnesium, zinc and Vit B12 (43,96,198,260d,264,338,339,347,427); depresses enzyme isocitric dehydrogenase (ICD) in fetus, causes reduced iodine uptake & hypothyroidism (50,91,212,222,369,382,390,459,35ab) ; causes learning disabilities and impairment, and reduction in IQ (1,3,38,110,160,285c,264,338,509/39), causes infertility (4,9,10,24,38,121,146,357, 365, 367,511 /4,10,55, 162), causes birth defects (23,35ab,37,38,50,110,142,241,338c,509,511/241).

(i) prenatal/early postnatal exposure affects level of nerve growth factor in the brain, impairs astrocyte function, and causes imbalances in development of brain (38,119,131,161,175,194,305,458/149,255,39)

(j) causes cardiovascular damage and disease: including damage to vascular endothelial cells, damage to sarcoplasmic reticula, sarcolemma, and contractile proteins, increased white cell count, decreased oxyhemoglobin level, high blood pressure, tachycardia, inhibits cytochrome P450/heme synthesis(84,35,201,539), and increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (35,59,201,202,205,212,232,306,310,351,510,50/201,308).

(k) causes immune system damage resulting in allergies, asthma, lupus(234),schleraderma(468),chronic fatigue syndrome(CFS),and multiple sensitivities(MCS) (8,17,26,35,45,46,60,75,86,87,90,95,97,101,128,129,131,132,154,156,168,181,212, 226,228,230,234,265,267,296,313,342,375,388,445,446/272) and neutrophil functional impairment (285,404,467/59,etc.).

(l) causes interruption of the cytochromeC oxidase system/ATP energy function (43,84,232,338c,35) and blocks enzymes needed to convert porphyrins to adenosine tri phosphate(ATP) causing progressive porphyrinuria, resulting in low energy, digestive problems, and porphyrins in urine (34,35,69,70,73,210,212,226,232,258,260)

(m) inhibition of immune system facilitates increased damage by bacterial, viral, and fungal infections (17,45,59,129,131,251,296,350,40),and increased antibiotic resistance (116,117,161,389,53,79).

(n) mercury causes significant destruction of stomach and intestine epithelial cells, resulting in damage to stomach lining which along with mercury's ability to bind to SH hydroxyl radical in cell membranes alters permeability(338,405,35,21c) and adversely alters bacterial populations in the intestines causing leaky gut syndrome with toxic, incompletely digested complexes in the blood(222,228b,35) and accumulation of heliobacter pylori, a suspected major factor in stomach ulcers and stomach cancer(256) and candida albicans, as well as poor nutrient absorption.

(o) forming strong bonds with and modification of the-SH groups of proteins causes mitochondrial release of calcium (1,21,35,38,43,329,333,432),as well as altering molecular function of amino acids and damaging enzymatic process(33,96,111,194,252,338,405,410-412) resulting in improper cysteine regulation(194), inhibited glucose transfer and uptake(338,254), damaged sulfur oxidation processes(33,194,338), and reduced glutathione availability (necessary for detoxification)(13,126,54).

(p) HgCl2 inhibits aquaporin-mediated water transport in red blood cells(479).

<BR WP="BR1"><BR WP="BR2">&nbsp;

3. Mercury has been well documented to be an endocrine system disrupting chemical in animals and people, disrupting function of the pituitary gland, thyroid gland, reproduction processes, and many hormonal functions at very low levels of exposure . Mercury (especially mercury vapor) rapidly crosses the blood brain barrier and is stored preferentially in the pituitary gland, thyroid gland, hypothalamus, and occipital cortex in direct proportion to the number and extent of dental amalgam surfaces (1,14,16,19,20,25,34,38,50,61,85,99,162,211,273,274,287, 327,348,360,366, 369) Thus mercury has a greater effect on the functions of these areas. Studies have documented that mercury causes hypothyroidism(50,390,35), damage of thyroid RNA(458), autoimmune thyroiditis (369,382,91) and impairment of conversion of thyroid T4 hormone to the active T3 form(369,382,459,35,50d,91). An overactive thyroid gland, or hyperthyroidism, can trigger restlessness, hyperactivity, insomnia and irritability - symptoms that could be mistaken for mania(560). On the other hand, a thyroid gland that responds sluggishly in a hypothyroid state may result in feelings of coldness, depression, pain, and low energy. Overt autoimmune thyroiditis is preceded by a rise in levels of thyroid peroxidase antibodies. "Collectively, reports show that 30-60% of women positive for TPO antibodies in pregnancy develop postpartum thyroiditis," the researchers point out(561), calling it "a strong association." Without treatment, many of the women with thyroiditis go on to develop overt clinical hypothyroidism as they age and, eventually, associated complications such as cardiovascular disease. About 5% of pregnant women develop thyroiditis after birth.

According to survey tests, 8 to 10 % of untreated women were found to have thyroid imbalances so the actual level of hypothyroidism is higher commonly recognized(508). Even larger percentages of women had elevated levels of antithyroglobulin(anti-TG) or antithyroid peroxidase antibody(anti-TP). Studies indicate that slight imbalances of thyroid hormones in expectant mothers can cause permanent neuropsychiatric damage in the developing fetus(509). Low first trimester levels of free T4 and positive levels of anti-TP antibodies in the mother during pregnancy have been found to result significantly reduces IQs(509). Hypothyroidism is a well documented cause of mental retardation(509). Women with the highest levels of thyroid-stimulating-hormone(TSH) and lowest free levels of thyroxine 17 weeks into their pregnancies were significantly more likely to have children who tested at least one standard deviation below normal on an IQ test taken at age 8. Based on study findings, maternal hypothyroidism appears to play a role in at least 15% of children whose IQs are more than 1 standard deviation below the mean, millions of children. Studies have also established a "clear association" between the presence of thyroid antibodies and spontaneous abortions(511), as well as a connection between maternal thyroid disease and babies born with heart, brain, and kidney defects(509c). Levels of recurrent abortions in a population with positive levels of thyroid antibodies in one study were 40%, 5 times the normal rate(511). Hypothyroidism is a well documented risk factor in spontaneous abortions and infertility(9). Another study of pregnant women who suffer from hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) found a four-times greater risk for miscarriage during the second trimester than those who don't, and women with untreated thyroid deficiency were four-times more likely to have a child with a developmental disabilities and lower I.Q. (509). The American Assoc. of Clinical Endocrinologists advises that all women considering becoming pregnant should get a serum thyrotropin test so that hypothyroidism can be diagnosed and treated early(558).

Mercury blocks thyroid hormone production by occupying iodine binding sites and inhibiting hormone action even when the measured thyroid level appears to be in proper range(390,35ab). The thyroid and hypothalamus regulate body temperature and many metabolic processes including enzymatic processes that when inhibited result in higher dental decay(35) . Mercury damage thus commonly results in poor bodily temperature control, in addition to many problems caused by hormonal imbalances such as depression. Such hormonal secretions are affected at levels of mercury exposure much lower than the acute toxicity effects normally tested(390,50,84), as previously confirmed by hormonal/reproductive problems in animal populations(104,381c,50d). Mercury also damages the blood brain barrier and facilitates penetration of the brain by other toxic metals and substances(311). Thyroid imbalances, which are documented to be commonly caused by mercury (369,382,459,35,50,91), have been found to play a major role in chronic heart conditions such as clogged arteries, mycardial infarction, and chronic heart failure(510).

Mercury can have significant effects on thyroid function even though the main hormone levels remain in the normal range, so the usual thyroid tests are not adequate in such cases. Prenatal methylmercury exposure severely affects the activity of selenoenzymes, including glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and 5-iodothyronine deiodinases(5-Di and 5'-DI) in the fetal brain, even though thyroxine(T4) levels are normal(390e). Gpx activity is severely inhibited, while 5-DI levels are decreased and 5'-DI increased in the fetal brain, similar to hypothyroidism. Thus normal thyroid tests will not pick up this condition.

The pituitary gland controls many of the body's endocrine system functions and secretes hormones that control most bodily processes, including the immune system and reproductive systems. One study found mercury levels in the pituitary gland ranged from 6.3 to 77 ppb(85), while another(348) found the mean level to be 30ppb- levels found to be neurotoxic and cytotoxic in animal studies. Some of the effect on depression is related to mercury's effect of reducing the level of posterior pituitary hormone(oxytocin). Low levels of pituitary function are associated with depression and suicidal thoughts, and appear to be a major factor in suicide of teenagers and other vulnerable groups. The pituitary glands of a group of dentists had 800 times more mercury than controls(99). This may explain why dentists have much higher levels of emotional problems, depression, suicide,etc(Section VIII.). Amalgam fillings, nickel and gold crowns are major factors in reducing pituitary function(35,50,369,etc.). Supplementary oxytocin extract has been found to alleviate many of these mood problems(35), along with replacement of metals in the mouth(Section VI.). The normalization of pituitary function also often normalizes menstrual cycle problems, endometriosis, and increases fertility(9,35).

The thymus gland plays a significant part in the establishment of the immune system and lymphatic system from the 12th week of gestation until puberty. Inhibition of thymus function can thus affect proper development of the immune and lymphatic systems. Lymphocyte differentiation, maturation and peripheral functions are affected by the thymic protein hormone thymulin. Mercury at very low concentrations has been seen to impair some lymphocytic functions causing subclinical manifestations in exposed workers. Animal studies have shown mercury significantly inhibits thymulin production at very low micromolar levels of exposure(513a). The metal allergens mercuric chloride and nickel sulfate were found to stimulate DNA synthesis of both immature and mature thymocytes at low levels of exposure, so chronic exposure can have long term effects(513b). Also, micromolar levels of mercuric ions specifically blocked synthesis of ribosomal RNA, causing fibrillarin relocation from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm in epithelial cells as a consequence of the blockade of ribosomal RNA synthesis. This appears to be a factor in deregulation of basic cellular events and in autoimmunity caused by mercury. There were specific immunotoxic and biochemical alterations in lymphoid organs of mice treated at the lower doses of mercury. The immunological defects were consistent with altered T-cell function as evidenced by decreases in both T-cell mitogen and mixed leukocyte responses. There was a particular association between the T-cell defects and inhibition of thymic pyruvate kinase, the rate-limiting enzyme for glycolysis(513c). Pyruvate and glycolysis problems are often seen in mercury toxic children being treated for autism(409).

4. Mercury's biochemical damage at the cellular level include DNA damage, inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis(4,38,41,42,114,142,175,197,272,296,305,392/149); alteration of protein structure (33,111,114,194,252/114); alteration of the transport of calcium(333,43,96,254,329,432); inhibition of glucose transport(338,254), and of enzyme function and other essential nutrient transport (96,198,254,258,263,264,338,339,347,410-412); induction of free radical formation(13,54,496), depletion of cellular glutathione(necessary for detoxification processes) (111,126), inhibition of glutathione peroxidase enzyme(13,258,496), endothelial cell damage(202), abnormal migration of neurons in the cerebral cortex(149), and immune system damage (34,38,111,194, 226,252,272,316,325,355).

Part of the toxic effects of mercury,cadmium, lead, etc. are through their replacing essential minerals such as zinc at their sites in enzymes, disabling the necessary enzymatic processes.

There has been a huge increase in the incidence of degenerative neurological conditions in virtually all Western countries over the last 2 decades(574). The increase in Alzheimer's has been over 300% while the increase in Parkinson's and other motor neuron disease has been over 50%. The primary cause appears to be increased exposures to toxic pollutants(574).

Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species(ROS) have been implicated as major factors in neurological disorders including stroke, PD, MS, Alzheimer's, ALS, MND,FM,CFS, etc. (13,35c,56,84,98,145,169,207b,258,424,442-444,453,462,496). Mercury induced lipid peroxidation has been found to be a major factor in mercury's neurotoxicity, along with leading to decreased levels of glutathione peroxidation and superoxide dismustase(SOD)(13,254,489,494-496). Metalloprotein(MT) are involved in metals transport and detoxification(442,464). Mercury inhibits sulfur ligands in MT and in the case of intestinal cell membranes inactivates MT that normally bind cuprous ions(477), thus allowing buildup of copper to toxic levels in many and malfunction of the Zn/Cu SOD function. Exposure to mercury results in changes in metalloprotein compounds that have genetic effects, having both structural and catalytic effects on gene expression(114,241,296,442,464,477,495). Some of the processes affected by such MT control of genes include cellular respiration, metabolism, enzymatic processes, metal-specific homeostasis, and adrenal stress response systems. Significant physiological changes occur when metal ion concentrations exceed threshold levels. Such MT formation also appears to have a relation to autoimmune reactions in significant numbers of people (114,60,313,342,369,442,464). Of a population of over 3000 tested by the immune lymphocyte reactivity test(MELISA,60,275), 22% tested positive for inorganic mercury and 8% for methyl mercury .

Programmed cell death(apoptosis) is documented to the a major factor in degenerative

neurological conditions like ALS, Alzheimer's, MS, Parkinson's, etc. Some of the factors documented to be involved in apoptosis of neurons and immune cells include inducement of the inflamatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha(TNFa) (126), reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress(13,43b,56a,296b), reduced glutathione levels(56,126a,111a), inhibition of protein kinase C(43), nitric oxide and peroxynitrite toxicity(43a), excitotoxicity and idation(490,496,521,524), excess free cysteine levels(56d,111a),excess glutamate toxicity(13b, 416e), excess dopamine toxicity (56d,13a), beta-amyloid generation(462), increased calcium influx toxicity (416e,296b,333,432,462c,507)and DNA fragmentation(296) and mitochondrial membrane dysfunction(56d,416e,51a).

TNFa(tumor necrosis factor-alpha) is a cytokine that controls a wide range of immune

cell response in mammals, including cell death(apoptosis). This process is involved in inflamatory and degenerative neurological conditions like ALS, MS, Parkinson's, rheumatoid arthritis, etc. Cell signaling mechanisms like sphingolipids are part of the control mechansim for the TNFa apoptosis mechanism(126a). Gluthathione is an amino acid that is a normal cellular mechanism for controlling apoptosis. When glutathione is depleted in the brain, reactive oxidative species increased, and CNS and cell signaling mechinsisms are disrupted by toxic exposures such as mercury, neuronal cell apoptosis results and neurological damage.<STRONG> Mercury has been shown to induce TNFa and deplete glutathione</STRONG><STRONG>, causing inflamatory effects and cellular apoptosis in neuronal and immune cells</STRONG>(126b,126c).

Another neurological effect of mercury that occurs at very low levels is inhibition of nerve growth factors, for which deficiencies result in nerve degeneration. Mercury vapor is lipid soluble and has an affinity for red blood cells and CNS cells(21a). Only a few micrograms of mercury severely disturb cellular function and inhibits nerve growth (175,147,226,255,305,149). Prenatal or neonatal exposures have been found to have life long effects on nerve function and susceptibility to toxic effects. Prenatal mercury vapor exposure that results in levels of only 4 parts per billion in newborn rat brains was found to cause decreases in nerve growth factor and other effects(305). This is a level that is common in the population with several amalgam fillings or other exposures(500). Insulin-like-growth factor I (IGF-I) are positively correlated with growth hormone levels and have been found to be the best easily measured marker for levels of growth hormone, but males have been found more responsive to this factor than women(497). IGF-I controls the survival of spinal motor neurons affected in ALS during development as well as later in life(497,498). IGF-I and insulin levels have been found to be reduced in ALS patients with evidence this is a factor in ALS(497,498). Several clinical trials have found IGF-I treatment is effective at reducing the damage and slowing the progression of ALS and Alzheimer's with no medically important adverse effects(498). It has also been found that in chronically ill patients the levels of pituitary and thyroid hormones that control many bodily processes are low, and that supplementing both thyrotropin-releasing hormone and growth control hormone is more effective at increasing all of these hormone levels in the patient(499).

(11) A direct mechanism involving mercury's inhibition of cellular enzymatic processes by binding with the hydroxyl radical(SH) in amino acids appears to be a major part of the connection to allergic/immune reactive conditions such as autism(408-414,439,464,468,476,33,160,251c), schizophrenia(409,410), lupus (234,330,331,468), Scleroderma(468), eczema and psoriasis (323,375,385,419,455,33), and allergies (26,46,60,95,132,152,156,271,313,330,331, 445,446,468). For example mercury has been found to strongly inhibit the activity of dipeptyl peptidase (DPP IV) which is required in the digestion of the milk protein casein(411,412) as well as of xanthine oxidase(439). Studies involving a large sample of autistic and schizophrenic patients found that over 90 % of those tested had high levels of the milk protein beta-casomorphin-7 in their blood and urine and defective enzymatic processes for digesting milk protein(410). Elimination of milk products from the diet has been found to improve the condition. Such populations have also been found to have high levels of mercury and to recover after mercury detox(413,60,313). As mercury levels are reduced the protein binding is reduced and improvement in the enzymatic process occurs. Additional cellular level enzymatic effects of mercury's binding with proteins include blockage of sulfur oxidation processes(33,114,194,412), enzymatic processes involving vitamins B6 and B12(418), effects on the cytochrome-C energy processes (43,84,232,338c,35), along with mercury's adverse effects on cellular mineral levels of calcium, magnesium, zinc, and lithium (43,96,119,198,333, 386,427,432,38). And along with these blockages of cellular enzymatic processes, mercury has been found to cause additional neurological and immune system effects in many through immune/autoimmune reactions (60,203d,313,314,21). Most doctors treating such conditions also usually recommend supplementing the deficient essential minerals previously noted that mercury affects, often obtaining a hair element test to determine imbalances and needs(386,484).

But the effect on the immune system of exposure to various toxic substances such as toxic metals and environmental pollutants has also been found to have additive or synergistic effects and to be a factor in increasing eczema, allergies, asthma, and sensitivity to other lesser allergens. Most of the children tested for toxic exposures have found high or reactive levels of other toxic metals, and organochlorine compounds (413,313,415). Much mercury in saliva and the brain is also organic (220,272,506), since mouth bacteria and other organisms in the body methylate inorganic mercury to organic mercury(51,81,225,503b,506,512). Studies and clinical tests have found amalgam to be the largest source of methyl mercury in most people(506,220,79,386,etc.). Bacteria also oxidize mercury vapor to the water soluble, ionic form Hg(II) (431). A clinical study found that methyl mercury in saliva is significantly higher in those with amalgam fillings than those without, and correlated with the number of amalgam fillings(506). The average level of methyl mercury in the blood of a group with amalgam was more than 4 times that of groups without amalgam or that had amalgam replced. Total mercury in those with amalgams was over 10 times that of those without amalgam. Other studies have found similar results(512,79,etc.).

5. Because of the extreme toxicity of mercury, only ½ gram is required to contaminate a 10 acre lake to the extent that a health warning would be issued by the government to not eat the fish(151,160). Over half the rivers and lakes in Florida have such health warnings banning or limiting eating of fish, and most other states and 4 Canadian provinces have similar health warnings(2). Wisconsin has fish consumption warnings for over 250 lakes and rivers and Minnesota even more, as part of the total of over 50,000 such lakes with warnings(2)..."
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

January 23rd, 2007, 5:10 pm #10

<SPAN name="Konabody"><FONT size=2>&nbsp;</FONT>
<FONT size=5><FONT size=4>"Unethical lawyering combined with shoddy journalism </FONT><STRONG>threatens many sectors of the economy</STRONG>, <FONT size=4>especially those that commonly face costly lawsuits alleging torts -- the </FONT><STRONG>drug, chemical, automobile and financial sectors, among others..."</STRONG></FONT>

<STRONG><FONT size=5></FONT></STRONG>&nbsp;

<FONT size=4>As for his comments re Jim Gottstein (<FONT size=3>and I see he likes to diagnose people he doesn't like as mentally ill.- is he a psychiatrist or just suffering from grandiose ideas that he is </FONT>- </FONT><SPAN class=drop><EM>"...Al Gore appears to suffer from Narcissistic Personality Disorder, which is not treatable with medications..." <SPAN class=articlebyline>By Dr. Henry I. Miller </SPAN>http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/m ... 010833.asp&nbsp;)</EM></SPAN>

<SPAN class=drop><EM></EM></SPAN>&nbsp;

<SPAN class=drop><STRONG>I'd like to know HOW MUCH FISH from MERCURY-CONTAMINATED US LAKES does Henry Miller eat?</STRONG></SPAN>

<SPAN class=drop><STRONG>A LOT I SUSPECT.</STRONG></SPAN>
</SPAN>
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