'Children should NOT be given the anti-viral drug Tamiflu...'

'Children should NOT be given the anti-viral drug Tamiflu...'

Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 11th, 2009, 12:36 am #1


http://groups.google.com/group/misc.act ... 6423b5da6d

ALLIANCE FOR HUMAN RESEARCH PROTECTION
Promoting Openness, Full Disclosure, and Accountability
http://www.ahrp.org


FYI


<strong>An Oxford University study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ),
led by David Mant, analyzed four studies involving children aged one to 12
who were prescribed Tamiflu. They found that the risks associated with
Tamiflu are not outweighed by the insignificant benefits:
</strong>

"<strong>The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in symptomatic
benefits</strong>."


The researchers reviewed four earlier clinical trials -- two with Relenza
and two with Tamiflu -- for influenza treatment covering 1,766 children 12
or younger. More half had confirmed cases of type A flu. They also reviewed
three other trials in which the drugs were given to children who had been
exposed to the virus but showed no symptoms.


The BMJ report comes 10 days after Britain's Health Protection Agency (HPA)
reported that <strong>more than half of 248 students given Tamiflu after a classmate
fell ill with swine flu suffered adverse side-effects such as nausea,
insomnia and nightmares.</strong> Most of the students did not have the flu when they
were given the drug. Thus, it <strong>cannot be argued--as the manufacturer of
Tamiflu does</strong>--that the symptoms were illness-related.


The UK Independent reports (below) that "the researchers found that using
anti-virals preventatively had little effect - reducing transmission of flu
by 8 per cent.
This means 13 children would have to be treated to prevent one additional
case of the flu."


Given the minimal benefit--reduction of flu symptoms by half a day (at most
one day), they conclude that a "more conservative strategy" is probably in
order.


Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at Oxford University, who was
also involved in the study, said the current policy of giving Tamiflu for
mild illness was an "inappropriate strategy:"


The study authors noted that the children were being treated for normal
seasonal flu but Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and senior clinical scientist at
Oxford University, said the findings would extend to the current swine flu
pandemic. "I don't think we have got any reason to think our results would
be any different," he said.
"The current swine flu is generally a mild flu illness...it does not seem
that different from current seasonal flu. We would be happy to say our
results apply to the current swine flu strain."


However, the UK Department of Health spokesman dismissed the Oxford
researchers' claims that their findings would also apply to swine flu.
"The BMJ review is based on seasonal flu and not swine flu," he said. "As
the authors note, the extent to which the findings can be applied to the
current pandemic is questionable - after all, we already know that swine flu
behaves differently to seasonal flu, and past pandemics have hit younger
people hardest."


"Whilst there is doubt about how swine flu affects children, we believe a
safety-first approach of offering anti-virals to everyone remains a sensible
and responsible way forward."


<strong>An investigation is in order to find what, if any, hidden persuaders
(undisclosed stakes) are at work influencing public health policy--in the
UK, the US, and the UN.
</strong>

Why are public officials promoting the premature, medically unsupportable
use of (1) an inadequately tested vaccine, H1N1, and (2) the use of
anti-viral drugs whose "benefit" vis-`-vis the flu, is merely reduced mild
symptoms by between half a day and one day?


See: Matthew Shun-Shin, Matthew Thompson, Carl Heneghan, Rafael Perera,
Anthony Harnden, David Mant. Neuraminidase inhibitors for treatment and
prophylaxis of influenza in children: systematic review and meta-analysis of
randomised controlled trials, BMJ, Aug 10, 2009 Available free at:
http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/339 ... ndemic_flu


See: http://anthraxvaccine.blogspot.com
See also,  http://www.ahrp.org/cms/content/view/619/9/ and
http://www.ahrp.org/cms/content/view/626/9/


Contact: Vera Hassner Sharav
verac...@ahrp.org
212-595-8974


http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style ... /health-ne...
-give-tamiflu-to-children-1770154.html
THE INDEPENDENT
'Don't give Tamiflu to children'
By Jane Kirby, Press Association
Monday, <strong>10 August 2009 </strong>


"There is a lot of concern amongst health authorities that people might buy
counterfeit drugs"


<strong>Children should not be given the anti-viral drug Tamiflu to combat swine
flu, Oxford University researchers said today.
</strong>They urged the Department of Health to <strong>urgently rethink </strong>its policy on giving
the drugs to youngsters affected by the current flu pandemic.


Some 300,000 people in England, including children and adults, have received
courses of Tamiflu through the Government's National Pandemic Flu Service
for England.


Today's study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), warned that
Tamiflu can cause vomiting in some children, which can lead to dehydration
and the need for hospital treatment.


The researchers said children should not be given the drug if they have a
mild form of the illness although they urged parents and GPs to remain
vigilant for signs of complications. Parents of children with a compromised
immune system or a condition like cystic fibrosis should discuss the harms
and benefits with their GP, they said.


But overall, the researchers said, children who were otherwise healthy could
suffer more harm than benefit from taking Tamiflu or another anti-viral,
Relenza.
They found the drugs had little or no effect on asthma flare-ups, ear
infections or the likelihood of a youngster needing antibiotics.


The researchers also found that using anti-virals preventatively had little
effect - reducing transmission of flu by 8 per cent.
This means 13 children would have to be treated to prevent one additional
case of the flu.
However, anti-virals could reduce symptoms by between half a day and one
day.


Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at Oxford University, said the
current policy of giving Tamiflu for mild illness was an "inappropriate
strategy".
He added: "The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in
symptomatic benefits."
He and Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and senior clinical scientist at Oxford
University, analysed four studies involving children aged one to 12.


The children were being treated for normal seasonal flu but Dr Thompson said
the findings would extend to the current swine flu pandemic.
"I don't think we have got any reason to think our results would be any
different," he said.
"<strong>The current swine flu is generally a mild flu illness...it does not seem
that different from current seasonal flu</strong>.
"We would be happy to say our results apply to the current swine flu
strain."


He said children with mild symptoms should be treated in the same way as if
they had any other mild flu - with drinks to cool high temperatures and
rest.


Dr Heneghan said the <strong>only</strong> benefit found in the study was that children were
back to normal half a day to one day earlier if taking Tamiflu or Relenza.
He said his advice to GPs was "not to rely on Tamiflu as a treatment to
reduce complications" or to think of it as a "magic bullet".
And he warned that widespread use of Tamiflu could result in the flu
becoming resistant to the drug.


"What is a problem going forward - like with antibiotics - is you run into a
resistance issue.
"Going forward we have a treatment which is ineffective because we've given
it to everybody."


Both researchers called on the Department of Health to review its current
policy.


Dr Thompson said: "It's possible a more conservative strategy (such as)
reserving these anti-viral drugs for people, for children who are more
likely to have complications of the illness might be a more sensible
strategy." Dr Heneghan added: "I think the Government should be looking at
this urgently, this week."


The experts said the studies had been publicly available to the Government
before it formulated its current strategy with regard to Tamiflu.
And they said the Government should have demanded more data from the
pharmaceutical companies which manufacture the drugs - Roche, which makes
Tamiflu, and GlaxoSmithKline, which makes Relenza.


Today's research was published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) and
follows two recent studies which found that more than half of children
taking Tamiflu suffered side-effects such as nausea, insomnia and
nightmares.


Experts from the Health Protection Agency (HPA) found a high proportion of
British schoolchildren reporting problems after taking the anti-viral
preventatively.


The experts behind one of the studies said that although children may have
attributed symptoms which were due to other illnesses to the use of Tamiflu,
that was "unlikely to account for all the symptoms experienced".


That study was carried out in April and May - before the Government decided
to stop using Tamiflu preventatively.


Only those with suspected or confirmed swine flu are now getting the drug
and are being urged to get access to Tamiflu through the Pandemic Flu
Service, which is accessed online or via a telephone helpline.


Children are known to be at high risk of catching the flu, with more than
40% of pre-school children getting the virus and 30% of school-age children
doing so, the researchers said.


A Department of Health spokesman dismissed the researchers' claims that
their findings would also apply to swine flu.
"The BMJ review is based on seasonal flu and not swine flu," he said. "As
the authors note, the extent to which the findings can be applied to the
current pandemic is questionable - after all, we already know that swine flu
behaves differently to seasonal flu, and past pandemics have hit younger
people hardest.


"Whilst there is doubt about how swine flu affects children, we believe a
safety-first approach of offering anti-virals to everyone remains a sensible
and responsible way forward."


He said the policy would be kept under review and people with mild symptoms
"may find bed rest and over-the-counter flu remedies work for them.
"But for those who experience severe symptoms, the best scientific advice
tells us that Tamiflu should still be taken as soon as possible - and to
suggest otherwise is potentially dangerous. "If people are in any doubt
about whether to take Tamiflu, they should contact their GP."


Liberal Democrat health spokesman Norman Lamb said: "This analysis needs to
be taken extremely seriously and demands an immediate response from the
Government. "An urgent review must be carried out into whether the benefits
of prescribing certain anti-viral drugs are worth the risks when it comes to
our children's health."


A total of 36 people in England have died after getting swine flu.


FAIR USE NOTICE: This may contain copyrighted () ) material the use of which
has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such
material is made available for educational purposes, to advance
understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and
social justice issues, etc. It is believed that this constitutes a 'fair
use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C.
section 107 of the US Copyright Law. This material is distributed without
profit. "
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 11th, 2009, 12:38 am #2


Tamiflu is NOT effective against flue and it DOES have serious adverse effects including in some cases DEATH.

 
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Joined: April 1st, 2004, 4:56 pm

August 11th, 2009, 9:17 am #3

http://groups.google.com/group/misc.act ... 6423b5da6d

ALLIANCE FOR HUMAN RESEARCH PROTECTION
Promoting Openness, Full Disclosure, and Accountability
http://www.ahrp.org


FYI


<strong>An Oxford University study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ),
led by David Mant, analyzed four studies involving children aged one to 12
who were prescribed Tamiflu. They found that the risks associated with
Tamiflu are not outweighed by the insignificant benefits:
</strong>

"<strong>The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in symptomatic
benefits</strong>."


The researchers reviewed four earlier clinical trials -- two with Relenza
and two with Tamiflu -- for influenza treatment covering 1,766 children 12
or younger. More half had confirmed cases of type A flu. They also reviewed
three other trials in which the drugs were given to children who had been
exposed to the virus but showed no symptoms.


The BMJ report comes 10 days after Britain's Health Protection Agency (HPA)
reported that <strong>more than half of 248 students given Tamiflu after a classmate
fell ill with swine flu suffered adverse side-effects such as nausea,
insomnia and nightmares.</strong> Most of the students did not have the flu when they
were given the drug. Thus, it <strong>cannot be argued--as the manufacturer of
Tamiflu does</strong>--that the symptoms were illness-related.


The UK Independent reports (below) that "the researchers found that using
anti-virals preventatively had little effect - reducing transmission of flu
by 8 per cent.
This means 13 children would have to be treated to prevent one additional
case of the flu."


Given the minimal benefit--reduction of flu symptoms by half a day (at most
one day), they conclude that a "more conservative strategy" is probably in
order.


Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at Oxford University, who was
also involved in the study, said the current policy of giving Tamiflu for
mild illness was an "inappropriate strategy:"


The study authors noted that the children were being treated for normal
seasonal flu but Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and senior clinical scientist at
Oxford University, said the findings would extend to the current swine flu
pandemic. "I don't think we have got any reason to think our results would
be any different," he said.
"The current swine flu is generally a mild flu illness...it does not seem
that different from current seasonal flu. We would be happy to say our
results apply to the current swine flu strain."


However, the UK Department of Health spokesman dismissed the Oxford
researchers' claims that their findings would also apply to swine flu.
"The BMJ review is based on seasonal flu and not swine flu," he said. "As
the authors note, the extent to which the findings can be applied to the
current pandemic is questionable - after all, we already know that swine flu
behaves differently to seasonal flu, and past pandemics have hit younger
people hardest."


"Whilst there is doubt about how swine flu affects children, we believe a
safety-first approach of offering anti-virals to everyone remains a sensible
and responsible way forward."


<strong>An investigation is in order to find what, if any, hidden persuaders
(undisclosed stakes) are at work influencing public health policy--in the
UK, the US, and the UN.
</strong>

Why are public officials promoting the premature, medically unsupportable
use of (1) an inadequately tested vaccine, H1N1, and (2) the use of
anti-viral drugs whose "benefit" vis-`-vis the flu, is merely reduced mild
symptoms by between half a day and one day?


See: Matthew Shun-Shin, Matthew Thompson, Carl Heneghan, Rafael Perera,
Anthony Harnden, David Mant. Neuraminidase inhibitors for treatment and
prophylaxis of influenza in children: systematic review and meta-analysis of
randomised controlled trials, BMJ, Aug 10, 2009 Available free at:
http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/339 ... ndemic_flu


See: http://anthraxvaccine.blogspot.com
See also,  http://www.ahrp.org/cms/content/view/619/9/ and
http://www.ahrp.org/cms/content/view/626/9/


Contact: Vera Hassner Sharav
verac...@ahrp.org
212-595-8974


http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style ... /health-ne...
-give-tamiflu-to-children-1770154.html
THE INDEPENDENT
'Don't give Tamiflu to children'
By Jane Kirby, Press Association
Monday, <strong>10 August 2009 </strong>


"There is a lot of concern amongst health authorities that people might buy
counterfeit drugs"


<strong>Children should not be given the anti-viral drug Tamiflu to combat swine
flu, Oxford University researchers said today.
</strong>They urged the Department of Health to <strong>urgently rethink </strong>its policy on giving
the drugs to youngsters affected by the current flu pandemic.


Some 300,000 people in England, including children and adults, have received
courses of Tamiflu through the Government's National Pandemic Flu Service
for England.


Today's study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), warned that
Tamiflu can cause vomiting in some children, which can lead to dehydration
and the need for hospital treatment.


The researchers said children should not be given the drug if they have a
mild form of the illness although they urged parents and GPs to remain
vigilant for signs of complications. Parents of children with a compromised
immune system or a condition like cystic fibrosis should discuss the harms
and benefits with their GP, they said.


But overall, the researchers said, children who were otherwise healthy could
suffer more harm than benefit from taking Tamiflu or another anti-viral,
Relenza.
They found the drugs had little or no effect on asthma flare-ups, ear
infections or the likelihood of a youngster needing antibiotics.


The researchers also found that using anti-virals preventatively had little
effect - reducing transmission of flu by 8 per cent.
This means 13 children would have to be treated to prevent one additional
case of the flu.
However, anti-virals could reduce symptoms by between half a day and one
day.


Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at Oxford University, said the
current policy of giving Tamiflu for mild illness was an "inappropriate
strategy".
He added: "The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in
symptomatic benefits."
He and Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and senior clinical scientist at Oxford
University, analysed four studies involving children aged one to 12.


The children were being treated for normal seasonal flu but Dr Thompson said
the findings would extend to the current swine flu pandemic.
"I don't think we have got any reason to think our results would be any
different," he said.
"<strong>The current swine flu is generally a mild flu illness...it does not seem
that different from current seasonal flu</strong>.
"We would be happy to say our results apply to the current swine flu
strain."


He said children with mild symptoms should be treated in the same way as if
they had any other mild flu - with drinks to cool high temperatures and
rest.


Dr Heneghan said the <strong>only</strong> benefit found in the study was that children were
back to normal half a day to one day earlier if taking Tamiflu or Relenza.
He said his advice to GPs was "not to rely on Tamiflu as a treatment to
reduce complications" or to think of it as a "magic bullet".
And he warned that widespread use of Tamiflu could result in the flu
becoming resistant to the drug.


"What is a problem going forward - like with antibiotics - is you run into a
resistance issue.
"Going forward we have a treatment which is ineffective because we've given
it to everybody."


Both researchers called on the Department of Health to review its current
policy.


Dr Thompson said: "It's possible a more conservative strategy (such as)
reserving these anti-viral drugs for people, for children who are more
likely to have complications of the illness might be a more sensible
strategy." Dr Heneghan added: "I think the Government should be looking at
this urgently, this week."


The experts said the studies had been publicly available to the Government
before it formulated its current strategy with regard to Tamiflu.
And they said the Government should have demanded more data from the
pharmaceutical companies which manufacture the drugs - Roche, which makes
Tamiflu, and GlaxoSmithKline, which makes Relenza.


Today's research was published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) and
follows two recent studies which found that more than half of children
taking Tamiflu suffered side-effects such as nausea, insomnia and
nightmares.


Experts from the Health Protection Agency (HPA) found a high proportion of
British schoolchildren reporting problems after taking the anti-viral
preventatively.


The experts behind one of the studies said that although children may have
attributed symptoms which were due to other illnesses to the use of Tamiflu,
that was "unlikely to account for all the symptoms experienced".


That study was carried out in April and May - before the Government decided
to stop using Tamiflu preventatively.


Only those with suspected or confirmed swine flu are now getting the drug
and are being urged to get access to Tamiflu through the Pandemic Flu
Service, which is accessed online or via a telephone helpline.


Children are known to be at high risk of catching the flu, with more than
40% of pre-school children getting the virus and 30% of school-age children
doing so, the researchers said.


A Department of Health spokesman dismissed the researchers' claims that
their findings would also apply to swine flu.
"The BMJ review is based on seasonal flu and not swine flu," he said. "As
the authors note, the extent to which the findings can be applied to the
current pandemic is questionable - after all, we already know that swine flu
behaves differently to seasonal flu, and past pandemics have hit younger
people hardest.


"Whilst there is doubt about how swine flu affects children, we believe a
safety-first approach of offering anti-virals to everyone remains a sensible
and responsible way forward."


He said the policy would be kept under review and people with mild symptoms
"may find bed rest and over-the-counter flu remedies work for them.
"But for those who experience severe symptoms, the best scientific advice
tells us that Tamiflu should still be taken as soon as possible - and to
suggest otherwise is potentially dangerous. "If people are in any doubt
about whether to take Tamiflu, they should contact their GP."


Liberal Democrat health spokesman Norman Lamb said: "This analysis needs to
be taken extremely seriously and demands an immediate response from the
Government. "An urgent review must be carried out into whether the benefits
of prescribing certain anti-viral drugs are worth the risks when it comes to
our children's health."


A total of 36 people in England have died after getting swine flu.


FAIR USE NOTICE: This may contain copyrighted () ) material the use of which
has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such
material is made available for educational purposes, to advance
understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and
social justice issues, etc. It is believed that this constitutes a 'fair
use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C.
section 107 of the US Copyright Law. This material is distributed without
profit. "
.
Sign InRegisterGirl 'almost died' after taking Tamiflu
http://www.ryeandbattleobserver.co.uk/l ... 5541987.jp
 <a></a><a></a><a></a><a></a><a></a>
<a>« Previous</a> « Previous<a>Next »</a> Next »<a>View Gallery</a><strong>Published Date: </strong>11 August 2009   TV presenter Andrew Castle has told how his daughter "almost died" after taking Tamiflu following a swine flu outbreak at Alleyn's School in south London.Castle said his older daughter Georgina was given the anti-viral drug when five pupils were diagnosed with the illness in May.

He added that the 16-year-old, who has asthma, had a "respiratory collapse" and "suffered very heavily" after being "just handed" the drug without having been properly diagnosed.

He confronted Health Secretary Andy Burnham on GMTV after Oxford University research cast doubt that the anti-viral drug's benefits outweighed its side-effects.

Mr Burnham sympathised with Castle, saying it must have been "very worrying", but maintained that advice to parents to treat swine flu with Tamiflu remained unchanged.

He said Georgina would have been given Tamiflu during the earlier "containment" phase of swine flu.

Given that swine flu had a "disproportionate effect" on children, he maintained that Tamiflu is "our only line of defence".

Mr Burnham said the research dealt with seasonal flu, not swine flu, and added: "That's a very important distinction.

"Swine flu is a new virus, it's early days and we're adopting very much a safety-first approach to tackling the illness."



Copyright (c) Press Association Ltd. 2009, All Rights Reserved
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Joined: April 1st, 2004, 4:56 pm

August 11th, 2009, 10:16 am #4

GMTV host Andrew Castle almost lost daughter to swine flu drug after 'respiratory collapse'
By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 10:46 AM on 11th August 2009


<img alt="Tamiflu terror: Andrew Castle pictured with daughters Georgina (left) and Claudia" src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/08/ ... 33x523.jpg" width="233" height="523">
Tamiflu terror: Andrew Castle pictured with daughters Georgina (left) and Claudia

GMTV presenter Andrew Castle today revealed how his daughter almost died after taking Tamilfu following an outbreak of swine flu at her south-east London school.

The former tennis player spoke of his familys ordeal in a heated exchange with health secretary Andy Burnham who defended the decision to give the drug to children as "our only line of defence'.

Mr Castle hit back and described how his daughter, Georgina, 16, suffered a respiratory collapse and "suffered very heavily after being 'just handed" Tamiflu.

The health secretary appeared on the breakfast show today to defend the use of the drug after research cast doubts on whether its benefits outweighed the side effects.

But the 45-year-old television presenter told how Georgina was given Tamiflu when five pupils at Alleyns School in south London were diagnosed with the illness in May.

He told Mr Burnham: I can tell you that my child - who was not diagnosed at all - she had asthma, she took Tamiflu and almost died, he said.

We saw a respiratory collapse through it and it almost cost my older child her life, he said on GMTV.

Nobody checked that she had swine flu beforehand. The Health Protection Agency just handed it out at the school and a lot of kids suffered in the school very heavily.

He went on: The doctors surgery wouldnt take her. The doctor said No, we cant take her to A&E. So shes just on the floor having this nightmare of a situation. A lot of people are in this situation. They dont know what to do.

Mr Burnham told the presenter: It must have been a very worrying situation for you, but that was in a very different phase of the illness when we were seeing the scenes from Mexico and we were in what we call the containment phase, where we were trying to isolate every case and then give Tamiflu to those around those cases."


He said his message to parents was that they should not be worried if their child was taking Tamiflu for swine flu.
<img alt="Heated exchange: Health Secretary Andy Burnham and presenter Andrew Castle clash on GMTV this morning" src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/08/ ... 68x286.jpg" width="468" height="286">
Heated exchange: Health Secretary Andy Burnham and presenter Andrew Castle clash on GMTV this morning



A Department of Health spokesman said no two cases were the same and anyone with concerns should contact their GP or the National Flu Centre where staff were highly trained to deal with this.

Some 300,000 people in England have received the drug through the Governments National Pandemic Flu Service for England.

But Oxford University researchers are urging to Government to rethink its policy. Yesterday they warned that Tamiflu can cause vomiting in some children, which can lead to dehydration and the need for hospital treatment.
<span>SWINE FLY DRUG TAMIFLU SHOULD NOT BE GIVEN TO CHILDREN, EXPERT WARNS</span>
<img alt="Tamiflu warning" src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/08/ ... 33x300.jpg" width="233" height="300">
Hard choice: Anti-virals help some children

Parents were warned last night not to give Tamiflu to children with swine flu because the risks far outweigh the negligible benefits.

Scientists said the powerful anti-viral puts children at higher risk of dangerous complications but has little impact on the length of their illness.

The study for a respected medical journal is the most extensive research of its kind yet carried out.

It concluded that Tamiflu also has very little impact on the spread of swine flu, and handing it out freely could even increase the virus's resistance to the drug.

The research will spark widespread confusion as it contradicts the Department of Health, which encourages parents to ring a hotline to get Tamiflu for their children at the first sign of flu-like illness.

It comes just a fortnight after a study found half the children taking Tamiflu had side-effects such as vomiting, nausea and nightmares.

The Government's emergency flu hotline handed out no fewer than 100,000 packs of Tamiflu to children under 12 in its first two weeks.

But the research, published in the British Medical Journal, queries this strategy of giving the drug to anyone with potential symptoms over a hotline manned by staff with no medical training.

<img alt="Tamiflu" src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/08/ ... 68x316.jpg" width="468" height="316">
Tamiflu: Researchers said children should not be given the anti-viral drug

The two experts behind the study said the Government should hold an urgent review into its policy.

Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and expert from the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford, warned that Tamiflu was not a 'magic bullet'.

He and Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and researcher at Oxford University, analysed four studies of children aged one to 12 taking Tamiflu or another anti-viral, Relenza.

It found that these children were likely to get better less than a day earlier than they would with just rest and recuperation, while in two of the studies the benefit was not statistically significant.

<img alt="Side-effects panel" src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/08/ ... 68x244.jpg" width="468" height="244">
Worryingly, one out of every 20 children who took the drug vomited. Vomiting is potentially serious in children as it can cause dehydration and hospital admission.

Dr Heneghan said of Tamiflu: 'The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in symptomatic benefits.'

Dr Thompson said otherwise healthy children with mild symptoms should be treated with rest and drinks to cool high temperatures but parents should be on their guard for any signs that their child is getting worse


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... z0Nrt8B3SI
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 11th, 2009, 10:55 am #5

http://groups.google.com/group/misc.act ... 6423b5da6d

ALLIANCE FOR HUMAN RESEARCH PROTECTION
Promoting Openness, Full Disclosure, and Accountability
http://www.ahrp.org


FYI


<strong>An Oxford University study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ),
led by David Mant, analyzed four studies involving children aged one to 12
who were prescribed Tamiflu. They found that the risks associated with
Tamiflu are not outweighed by the insignificant benefits:
</strong>

"<strong>The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in symptomatic
benefits</strong>."


The researchers reviewed four earlier clinical trials -- two with Relenza
and two with Tamiflu -- for influenza treatment covering 1,766 children 12
or younger. More half had confirmed cases of type A flu. They also reviewed
three other trials in which the drugs were given to children who had been
exposed to the virus but showed no symptoms.


The BMJ report comes 10 days after Britain's Health Protection Agency (HPA)
reported that <strong>more than half of 248 students given Tamiflu after a classmate
fell ill with swine flu suffered adverse side-effects such as nausea,
insomnia and nightmares.</strong> Most of the students did not have the flu when they
were given the drug. Thus, it <strong>cannot be argued--as the manufacturer of
Tamiflu does</strong>--that the symptoms were illness-related.


The UK Independent reports (below) that "the researchers found that using
anti-virals preventatively had little effect - reducing transmission of flu
by 8 per cent.
This means 13 children would have to be treated to prevent one additional
case of the flu."


Given the minimal benefit--reduction of flu symptoms by half a day (at most
one day), they conclude that a "more conservative strategy" is probably in
order.


Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at Oxford University, who was
also involved in the study, said the current policy of giving Tamiflu for
mild illness was an "inappropriate strategy:"


The study authors noted that the children were being treated for normal
seasonal flu but Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and senior clinical scientist at
Oxford University, said the findings would extend to the current swine flu
pandemic. "I don't think we have got any reason to think our results would
be any different," he said.
"The current swine flu is generally a mild flu illness...it does not seem
that different from current seasonal flu. We would be happy to say our
results apply to the current swine flu strain."


However, the UK Department of Health spokesman dismissed the Oxford
researchers' claims that their findings would also apply to swine flu.
"The BMJ review is based on seasonal flu and not swine flu," he said. "As
the authors note, the extent to which the findings can be applied to the
current pandemic is questionable - after all, we already know that swine flu
behaves differently to seasonal flu, and past pandemics have hit younger
people hardest."


"Whilst there is doubt about how swine flu affects children, we believe a
safety-first approach of offering anti-virals to everyone remains a sensible
and responsible way forward."


<strong>An investigation is in order to find what, if any, hidden persuaders
(undisclosed stakes) are at work influencing public health policy--in the
UK, the US, and the UN.
</strong>

Why are public officials promoting the premature, medically unsupportable
use of (1) an inadequately tested vaccine, H1N1, and (2) the use of
anti-viral drugs whose "benefit" vis-`-vis the flu, is merely reduced mild
symptoms by between half a day and one day?


See: Matthew Shun-Shin, Matthew Thompson, Carl Heneghan, Rafael Perera,
Anthony Harnden, David Mant. Neuraminidase inhibitors for treatment and
prophylaxis of influenza in children: systematic review and meta-analysis of
randomised controlled trials, BMJ, Aug 10, 2009 Available free at:
http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/339 ... ndemic_flu


See: http://anthraxvaccine.blogspot.com
See also,  http://www.ahrp.org/cms/content/view/619/9/ and
http://www.ahrp.org/cms/content/view/626/9/


Contact: Vera Hassner Sharav
verac...@ahrp.org
212-595-8974


http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style ... /health-ne...
-give-tamiflu-to-children-1770154.html
THE INDEPENDENT
'Don't give Tamiflu to children'
By Jane Kirby, Press Association
Monday, <strong>10 August 2009 </strong>


"There is a lot of concern amongst health authorities that people might buy
counterfeit drugs"


<strong>Children should not be given the anti-viral drug Tamiflu to combat swine
flu, Oxford University researchers said today.
</strong>They urged the Department of Health to <strong>urgently rethink </strong>its policy on giving
the drugs to youngsters affected by the current flu pandemic.


Some 300,000 people in England, including children and adults, have received
courses of Tamiflu through the Government's National Pandemic Flu Service
for England.


Today's study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), warned that
Tamiflu can cause vomiting in some children, which can lead to dehydration
and the need for hospital treatment.


The researchers said children should not be given the drug if they have a
mild form of the illness although they urged parents and GPs to remain
vigilant for signs of complications. Parents of children with a compromised
immune system or a condition like cystic fibrosis should discuss the harms
and benefits with their GP, they said.


But overall, the researchers said, children who were otherwise healthy could
suffer more harm than benefit from taking Tamiflu or another anti-viral,
Relenza.
They found the drugs had little or no effect on asthma flare-ups, ear
infections or the likelihood of a youngster needing antibiotics.


The researchers also found that using anti-virals preventatively had little
effect - reducing transmission of flu by 8 per cent.
This means 13 children would have to be treated to prevent one additional
case of the flu.
However, anti-virals could reduce symptoms by between half a day and one
day.


Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at Oxford University, said the
current policy of giving Tamiflu for mild illness was an "inappropriate
strategy".
He added: "The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in
symptomatic benefits."
He and Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and senior clinical scientist at Oxford
University, analysed four studies involving children aged one to 12.


The children were being treated for normal seasonal flu but Dr Thompson said
the findings would extend to the current swine flu pandemic.
"I don't think we have got any reason to think our results would be any
different," he said.
"<strong>The current swine flu is generally a mild flu illness...it does not seem
that different from current seasonal flu</strong>.
"We would be happy to say our results apply to the current swine flu
strain."


He said children with mild symptoms should be treated in the same way as if
they had any other mild flu - with drinks to cool high temperatures and
rest.


Dr Heneghan said the <strong>only</strong> benefit found in the study was that children were
back to normal half a day to one day earlier if taking Tamiflu or Relenza.
He said his advice to GPs was "not to rely on Tamiflu as a treatment to
reduce complications" or to think of it as a "magic bullet".
And he warned that widespread use of Tamiflu could result in the flu
becoming resistant to the drug.


"What is a problem going forward - like with antibiotics - is you run into a
resistance issue.
"Going forward we have a treatment which is ineffective because we've given
it to everybody."


Both researchers called on the Department of Health to review its current
policy.


Dr Thompson said: "It's possible a more conservative strategy (such as)
reserving these anti-viral drugs for people, for children who are more
likely to have complications of the illness might be a more sensible
strategy." Dr Heneghan added: "I think the Government should be looking at
this urgently, this week."


The experts said the studies had been publicly available to the Government
before it formulated its current strategy with regard to Tamiflu.
And they said the Government should have demanded more data from the
pharmaceutical companies which manufacture the drugs - Roche, which makes
Tamiflu, and GlaxoSmithKline, which makes Relenza.


Today's research was published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) and
follows two recent studies which found that more than half of children
taking Tamiflu suffered side-effects such as nausea, insomnia and
nightmares.


Experts from the Health Protection Agency (HPA) found a high proportion of
British schoolchildren reporting problems after taking the anti-viral
preventatively.


The experts behind one of the studies said that although children may have
attributed symptoms which were due to other illnesses to the use of Tamiflu,
that was "unlikely to account for all the symptoms experienced".


That study was carried out in April and May - before the Government decided
to stop using Tamiflu preventatively.


Only those with suspected or confirmed swine flu are now getting the drug
and are being urged to get access to Tamiflu through the Pandemic Flu
Service, which is accessed online or via a telephone helpline.


Children are known to be at high risk of catching the flu, with more than
40% of pre-school children getting the virus and 30% of school-age children
doing so, the researchers said.


A Department of Health spokesman dismissed the researchers' claims that
their findings would also apply to swine flu.
"The BMJ review is based on seasonal flu and not swine flu," he said. "As
the authors note, the extent to which the findings can be applied to the
current pandemic is questionable - after all, we already know that swine flu
behaves differently to seasonal flu, and past pandemics have hit younger
people hardest.


"Whilst there is doubt about how swine flu affects children, we believe a
safety-first approach of offering anti-virals to everyone remains a sensible
and responsible way forward."


He said the policy would be kept under review and people with mild symptoms
"may find bed rest and over-the-counter flu remedies work for them.
"But for those who experience severe symptoms, the best scientific advice
tells us that Tamiflu should still be taken as soon as possible - and to
suggest otherwise is potentially dangerous. "If people are in any doubt
about whether to take Tamiflu, they should contact their GP."


Liberal Democrat health spokesman Norman Lamb said: "This analysis needs to
be taken extremely seriously and demands an immediate response from the
Government. "An urgent review must be carried out into whether the benefits
of prescribing certain anti-viral drugs are worth the risks when it comes to
our children's health."


A total of 36 people in England have died after getting swine flu.


FAIR USE NOTICE: This may contain copyrighted () ) material the use of which
has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such
material is made available for educational purposes, to advance
understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and
social justice issues, etc. It is believed that this constitutes a 'fair
use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C.
section 107 of the US Copyright Law. This material is distributed without
profit. "
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2009/aug/0 ... osis-death
Girl, two, dies after swine flu misdiagnosis
Child with possible meningitis was 'failed by system' say parents

<strong>Jo Adetunji</strong>   Saturday 8 August 2009 01.08 BST

</font> 

<strong></strong><strong></strong>

The parents of a two-year-old girl thought to have died from meningitis after they were told she was suffering from swine flu said yesterday that she had been "failed by the system".

Georgia Keeling, from Norwich, died after being rushed to hospital on Tuesday. Her parents, Paul Sewell, 21, and Tasha Keeling, 22, said <strong>they contacted health services, including NHS Direct, the swine </strong><strong>flu</strong><strong> helpline and the emergency services, five times</strong> after their daughter first developed a temperature on Saturday.

The couple said that <strong>by Tuesday she had also developed a rash, bruising and had been sick, but their concerns that she might have meningitis were ignored.</strong>

They said that on <strong>two occasions they were told Georgia did not need to be admitted to hospital and after one 999 call, a paramedic arrived with Tamiflu and paracetamol.</strong> It was only after another 999 call an hour later, when her eyes had glazed over, that she was taken to hospital. Georgia suffered a heart attack and attempts to resuscitate her failed.

Speaking to a local paper, Sewell said: "I don't feel like the paramedics did their job properly. She wasn't given a chance, they had <strong>diagnosed her before even looking at her </strong>and came out ready to give her Tamiflu. She was failed by the system big time. I just want to know how come they didn't take her into hospital straight away.

"<strong>You trust them because they are qualified professionals, you don't really think to question what they say</strong>. I'm not a doctor, but you could see she was really ill."

The child's death comes just a few weeks after a warning from The Meningitis Trust against <strong>mistaking the symptoms of meningitis for swine flu.</strong> Several, including fever, muscle pain and headaches, are common to both conditions and several health charities have expressed concern that doctors and health professionals could miss them.

A recent poll in GP Newspaper revealed that in a survey of 251 GPs, almost 90% believed that diagnosing swine flu over the phone could mean that other diseases, such as <strong>meningitis and bronchitis,</strong> were missed.

Georgia's family say that <strong>although she was eventually seen, they were still told she had swine flu.</strong>

Health officials said yesterday that they were launching an investigation into how the child died and would be looking into the possibility that she may have been wrongly diagnosed with swine flu.

NHS Norfolk, which manages GP services in the area, said it was working with other agencies to ensure that there was a "thorough investigation of the circumstances."

The East of England Ambulance Service said they had not received a complaint from Georgia's family but would be conducting a full investigation.

"We extend our sincere condolences to the family at this sad time. The ambulance service is committed to providing the highest standards of patient care and we will be conducting a full investigation into this serious incident to find out exactly what happened. We won't be in a position to comment further until the findings of that investigation are known," a spokeswoman said."

<strong></strong> 

http://www.people.co.uk/news/tm_headlin ... _page.html
9 August 2009<font size="5"><strong>Dying of meningitis but tot got Tamiflu </strong>
Andy Young
A two-year-old girl has died of meningitis after TWICE being wrongly diagnosed with swine flu.

The grieving father of toddler Georgia Keeling said: "If medics didn't jump to conclusions she might still be alive."

Paul Sewell hit out after <strong>NHS DIRECT dismissed the family's fears that Georgia had deadly meningitis</strong>.



And PARAMEDICS answering the family's 999 call also claimed she had swine flu and should take Tamiflu.



<strong>Paul, 21, a salesman, added: "Her death shows how wrongly diagnosing swine flu can have catastrophic effects.</strong>



"Everyone was too quick to suggest she had it.



"I don't feel the paramedics did their job properly. They diagnosed her before even looking at her and came out ready to give her Tamiflu."



"She was not given a chance. I want to know why she wasn't taken to hospital straight away. You could see she was really ill."



Georgia fell ill at home in Norwich on Monday with a cough and high temperature. They next day, she was also drowsy and had a rash. The family rang the swine flu helpline and were told the child had only one symptom of the illness.



Her mum, Tasha Keeling, 22, suspected meningitis. She grew even more worried after the rash failed to disappear when she pressed it with a glass.



However, an NHS Direct operator dismissed those fears and told the family to call 999 only if her temperature hit 40°C. Within an hour, the family were so worried they did just that. Two paramedics arrived. Mum-of-three Tasha said: "One said it definitely was not meningitis.



"<strong>They just gave us Tamiflu and told us she needed plenty of peace and quiet. A proper ambulance was on its way, but they said it was not needed and they went away</strong>."



Soon afterwards, Georgia's eyes glazed over and she stopped breathing. Tasha dialled 999 again but Georgia was declared dead in hospital.



Tests are being done to confirm meningitis. East Anglia Ambulance Service said: "We are committed to providing the highest standards of patient care.



"We will conduct a full investigation. We won't be in a position to comment further until the findings are known."
Quote
Like
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 11th, 2009, 11:07 am #6

http://groups.google.com/group/misc.act ... 6423b5da6d

ALLIANCE FOR HUMAN RESEARCH PROTECTION
Promoting Openness, Full Disclosure, and Accountability
http://www.ahrp.org


FYI


<strong>An Oxford University study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ),
led by David Mant, analyzed four studies involving children aged one to 12
who were prescribed Tamiflu. They found that the risks associated with
Tamiflu are not outweighed by the insignificant benefits:
</strong>

"<strong>The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in symptomatic
benefits</strong>."


The researchers reviewed four earlier clinical trials -- two with Relenza
and two with Tamiflu -- for influenza treatment covering 1,766 children 12
or younger. More half had confirmed cases of type A flu. They also reviewed
three other trials in which the drugs were given to children who had been
exposed to the virus but showed no symptoms.


The BMJ report comes 10 days after Britain's Health Protection Agency (HPA)
reported that <strong>more than half of 248 students given Tamiflu after a classmate
fell ill with swine flu suffered adverse side-effects such as nausea,
insomnia and nightmares.</strong> Most of the students did not have the flu when they
were given the drug. Thus, it <strong>cannot be argued--as the manufacturer of
Tamiflu does</strong>--that the symptoms were illness-related.


The UK Independent reports (below) that "the researchers found that using
anti-virals preventatively had little effect - reducing transmission of flu
by 8 per cent.
This means 13 children would have to be treated to prevent one additional
case of the flu."


Given the minimal benefit--reduction of flu symptoms by half a day (at most
one day), they conclude that a "more conservative strategy" is probably in
order.


Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at Oxford University, who was
also involved in the study, said the current policy of giving Tamiflu for
mild illness was an "inappropriate strategy:"


The study authors noted that the children were being treated for normal
seasonal flu but Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and senior clinical scientist at
Oxford University, said the findings would extend to the current swine flu
pandemic. "I don't think we have got any reason to think our results would
be any different," he said.
"The current swine flu is generally a mild flu illness...it does not seem
that different from current seasonal flu. We would be happy to say our
results apply to the current swine flu strain."


However, the UK Department of Health spokesman dismissed the Oxford
researchers' claims that their findings would also apply to swine flu.
"The BMJ review is based on seasonal flu and not swine flu," he said. "As
the authors note, the extent to which the findings can be applied to the
current pandemic is questionable - after all, we already know that swine flu
behaves differently to seasonal flu, and past pandemics have hit younger
people hardest."


"Whilst there is doubt about how swine flu affects children, we believe a
safety-first approach of offering anti-virals to everyone remains a sensible
and responsible way forward."


<strong>An investigation is in order to find what, if any, hidden persuaders
(undisclosed stakes) are at work influencing public health policy--in the
UK, the US, and the UN.
</strong>

Why are public officials promoting the premature, medically unsupportable
use of (1) an inadequately tested vaccine, H1N1, and (2) the use of
anti-viral drugs whose "benefit" vis-`-vis the flu, is merely reduced mild
symptoms by between half a day and one day?


See: Matthew Shun-Shin, Matthew Thompson, Carl Heneghan, Rafael Perera,
Anthony Harnden, David Mant. Neuraminidase inhibitors for treatment and
prophylaxis of influenza in children: systematic review and meta-analysis of
randomised controlled trials, BMJ, Aug 10, 2009 Available free at:
http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/339 ... ndemic_flu


See: http://anthraxvaccine.blogspot.com
See also,  http://www.ahrp.org/cms/content/view/619/9/ and
http://www.ahrp.org/cms/content/view/626/9/


Contact: Vera Hassner Sharav
verac...@ahrp.org
212-595-8974


http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style ... /health-ne...
-give-tamiflu-to-children-1770154.html
THE INDEPENDENT
'Don't give Tamiflu to children'
By Jane Kirby, Press Association
Monday, <strong>10 August 2009 </strong>


"There is a lot of concern amongst health authorities that people might buy
counterfeit drugs"


<strong>Children should not be given the anti-viral drug Tamiflu to combat swine
flu, Oxford University researchers said today.
</strong>They urged the Department of Health to <strong>urgently rethink </strong>its policy on giving
the drugs to youngsters affected by the current flu pandemic.


Some 300,000 people in England, including children and adults, have received
courses of Tamiflu through the Government's National Pandemic Flu Service
for England.


Today's study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), warned that
Tamiflu can cause vomiting in some children, which can lead to dehydration
and the need for hospital treatment.


The researchers said children should not be given the drug if they have a
mild form of the illness although they urged parents and GPs to remain
vigilant for signs of complications. Parents of children with a compromised
immune system or a condition like cystic fibrosis should discuss the harms
and benefits with their GP, they said.


But overall, the researchers said, children who were otherwise healthy could
suffer more harm than benefit from taking Tamiflu or another anti-viral,
Relenza.
They found the drugs had little or no effect on asthma flare-ups, ear
infections or the likelihood of a youngster needing antibiotics.


The researchers also found that using anti-virals preventatively had little
effect - reducing transmission of flu by 8 per cent.
This means 13 children would have to be treated to prevent one additional
case of the flu.
However, anti-virals could reduce symptoms by between half a day and one
day.


Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at Oxford University, said the
current policy of giving Tamiflu for mild illness was an "inappropriate
strategy".
He added: "The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in
symptomatic benefits."
He and Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and senior clinical scientist at Oxford
University, analysed four studies involving children aged one to 12.


The children were being treated for normal seasonal flu but Dr Thompson said
the findings would extend to the current swine flu pandemic.
"I don't think we have got any reason to think our results would be any
different," he said.
"<strong>The current swine flu is generally a mild flu illness...it does not seem
that different from current seasonal flu</strong>.
"We would be happy to say our results apply to the current swine flu
strain."


He said children with mild symptoms should be treated in the same way as if
they had any other mild flu - with drinks to cool high temperatures and
rest.


Dr Heneghan said the <strong>only</strong> benefit found in the study was that children were
back to normal half a day to one day earlier if taking Tamiflu or Relenza.
He said his advice to GPs was "not to rely on Tamiflu as a treatment to
reduce complications" or to think of it as a "magic bullet".
And he warned that widespread use of Tamiflu could result in the flu
becoming resistant to the drug.


"What is a problem going forward - like with antibiotics - is you run into a
resistance issue.
"Going forward we have a treatment which is ineffective because we've given
it to everybody."


Both researchers called on the Department of Health to review its current
policy.


Dr Thompson said: "It's possible a more conservative strategy (such as)
reserving these anti-viral drugs for people, for children who are more
likely to have complications of the illness might be a more sensible
strategy." Dr Heneghan added: "I think the Government should be looking at
this urgently, this week."


The experts said the studies had been publicly available to the Government
before it formulated its current strategy with regard to Tamiflu.
And they said the Government should have demanded more data from the
pharmaceutical companies which manufacture the drugs - Roche, which makes
Tamiflu, and GlaxoSmithKline, which makes Relenza.


Today's research was published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) and
follows two recent studies which found that more than half of children
taking Tamiflu suffered side-effects such as nausea, insomnia and
nightmares.


Experts from the Health Protection Agency (HPA) found a high proportion of
British schoolchildren reporting problems after taking the anti-viral
preventatively.


The experts behind one of the studies said that although children may have
attributed symptoms which were due to other illnesses to the use of Tamiflu,
that was "unlikely to account for all the symptoms experienced".


That study was carried out in April and May - before the Government decided
to stop using Tamiflu preventatively.


Only those with suspected or confirmed swine flu are now getting the drug
and are being urged to get access to Tamiflu through the Pandemic Flu
Service, which is accessed online or via a telephone helpline.


Children are known to be at high risk of catching the flu, with more than
40% of pre-school children getting the virus and 30% of school-age children
doing so, the researchers said.


A Department of Health spokesman dismissed the researchers' claims that
their findings would also apply to swine flu.
"The BMJ review is based on seasonal flu and not swine flu," he said. "As
the authors note, the extent to which the findings can be applied to the
current pandemic is questionable - after all, we already know that swine flu
behaves differently to seasonal flu, and past pandemics have hit younger
people hardest.


"Whilst there is doubt about how swine flu affects children, we believe a
safety-first approach of offering anti-virals to everyone remains a sensible
and responsible way forward."


He said the policy would be kept under review and people with mild symptoms
"may find bed rest and over-the-counter flu remedies work for them.
"But for those who experience severe symptoms, the best scientific advice
tells us that Tamiflu should still be taken as soon as possible - and to
suggest otherwise is potentially dangerous. "If people are in any doubt
about whether to take Tamiflu, they should contact their GP."


Liberal Democrat health spokesman Norman Lamb said: "This analysis needs to
be taken extremely seriously and demands an immediate response from the
Government. "An urgent review must be carried out into whether the benefits
of prescribing certain anti-viral drugs are worth the risks when it comes to
our children's health."


A total of 36 people in England have died after getting swine flu.


FAIR USE NOTICE: This may contain copyrighted () ) material the use of which
has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such
material is made available for educational purposes, to advance
understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and
social justice issues, etc. It is believed that this constitutes a 'fair
use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C.
section 107 of the US Copyright Law. This material is distributed without
profit. "
<em>"Despite treatment, his condition continued to worsen, which led to multiple organ failure, the sources said." </em>

http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/00 ... 101140.htm

<strong>[color=#0000ff" size="4]Child dies of swine flu, first victim in Chennai[/color]</strong>
<p style="margin-left:2pt;">Dinesh Verma and Ramya Kannan
<p style="margin-left:2pt;">CHENNAI: Swine flu has claimed its first victim in Tamil Nadu with the death on of a 4-year-old boy at a private hospital in Chennai on Monday.
<p style="margin-left:2pt;">
<p style="margin-left:2pt;">Hospital authorities said, the boy, who had tested positive for A (H1N1) virus, died due to mulitple organ failure at 8.35 a.m.
<p style="margin-left:2pt;">Three other persons who were in contact with the child, including his brother have tested positive, according to health department officials. They were already started on Tamiflu on Sunday.
<p style="margin-left:2pt;">PTI adds:
<p style="margin-left:2pt;"><strong>The boy, who was prone to asthma attacks and had breathing difficulties, was put on ventilator support after he turned critical on Sunday, official sources said</strong>.
<p style="margin-left:2pt;"><strong>Initially admitted to the hospital for kidney failure, the victim was also being treated for swine flu after the swab samples tested positive to the H1N1 virus, they said</strong>.
<p style="margin-left:2pt;"><strong>Despite treatment, his condition continued to worsen, which led to multiple organ failure, the sources said. </strong>
<p style="margin-left:2pt;">The Tamil Nadu government had said on Sunday that it wanted to "re-validate" swab tests done on the boy, <strong>since only gastric-related samples were sent for tests and not the usual nose and throat samples. </strong>
<p style="margin-left:2pt;">S Ilango, Director of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, said that it "was not a typical case" since the boy had not travelled to any country though his father had recently gone to Singapore.
<p style="margin-left:2pt;">The boy was referred to the hospital from another private hospital for dialysis, Ilango said, adding that he had earlier undergone treatment for fever. "
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 11th, 2009, 11:40 am #7

http://groups.google.com/group/misc.act ... 6423b5da6d

ALLIANCE FOR HUMAN RESEARCH PROTECTION
Promoting Openness, Full Disclosure, and Accountability
http://www.ahrp.org


FYI


<strong>An Oxford University study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ),
led by David Mant, analyzed four studies involving children aged one to 12
who were prescribed Tamiflu. They found that the risks associated with
Tamiflu are not outweighed by the insignificant benefits:
</strong>

"<strong>The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in symptomatic
benefits</strong>."


The researchers reviewed four earlier clinical trials -- two with Relenza
and two with Tamiflu -- for influenza treatment covering 1,766 children 12
or younger. More half had confirmed cases of type A flu. They also reviewed
three other trials in which the drugs were given to children who had been
exposed to the virus but showed no symptoms.


The BMJ report comes 10 days after Britain's Health Protection Agency (HPA)
reported that <strong>more than half of 248 students given Tamiflu after a classmate
fell ill with swine flu suffered adverse side-effects such as nausea,
insomnia and nightmares.</strong> Most of the students did not have the flu when they
were given the drug. Thus, it <strong>cannot be argued--as the manufacturer of
Tamiflu does</strong>--that the symptoms were illness-related.


The UK Independent reports (below) that "the researchers found that using
anti-virals preventatively had little effect - reducing transmission of flu
by 8 per cent.
This means 13 children would have to be treated to prevent one additional
case of the flu."


Given the minimal benefit--reduction of flu symptoms by half a day (at most
one day), they conclude that a "more conservative strategy" is probably in
order.


Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at Oxford University, who was
also involved in the study, said the current policy of giving Tamiflu for
mild illness was an "inappropriate strategy:"


The study authors noted that the children were being treated for normal
seasonal flu but Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and senior clinical scientist at
Oxford University, said the findings would extend to the current swine flu
pandemic. "I don't think we have got any reason to think our results would
be any different," he said.
"The current swine flu is generally a mild flu illness...it does not seem
that different from current seasonal flu. We would be happy to say our
results apply to the current swine flu strain."


However, the UK Department of Health spokesman dismissed the Oxford
researchers' claims that their findings would also apply to swine flu.
"The BMJ review is based on seasonal flu and not swine flu," he said. "As
the authors note, the extent to which the findings can be applied to the
current pandemic is questionable - after all, we already know that swine flu
behaves differently to seasonal flu, and past pandemics have hit younger
people hardest."


"Whilst there is doubt about how swine flu affects children, we believe a
safety-first approach of offering anti-virals to everyone remains a sensible
and responsible way forward."


<strong>An investigation is in order to find what, if any, hidden persuaders
(undisclosed stakes) are at work influencing public health policy--in the
UK, the US, and the UN.
</strong>

Why are public officials promoting the premature, medically unsupportable
use of (1) an inadequately tested vaccine, H1N1, and (2) the use of
anti-viral drugs whose "benefit" vis-`-vis the flu, is merely reduced mild
symptoms by between half a day and one day?


See: Matthew Shun-Shin, Matthew Thompson, Carl Heneghan, Rafael Perera,
Anthony Harnden, David Mant. Neuraminidase inhibitors for treatment and
prophylaxis of influenza in children: systematic review and meta-analysis of
randomised controlled trials, BMJ, Aug 10, 2009 Available free at:
http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/339 ... ndemic_flu


See: http://anthraxvaccine.blogspot.com
See also,  http://www.ahrp.org/cms/content/view/619/9/ and
http://www.ahrp.org/cms/content/view/626/9/


Contact: Vera Hassner Sharav
verac...@ahrp.org
212-595-8974


http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style ... /health-ne...
-give-tamiflu-to-children-1770154.html
THE INDEPENDENT
'Don't give Tamiflu to children'
By Jane Kirby, Press Association
Monday, <strong>10 August 2009 </strong>


"There is a lot of concern amongst health authorities that people might buy
counterfeit drugs"


<strong>Children should not be given the anti-viral drug Tamiflu to combat swine
flu, Oxford University researchers said today.
</strong>They urged the Department of Health to <strong>urgently rethink </strong>its policy on giving
the drugs to youngsters affected by the current flu pandemic.


Some 300,000 people in England, including children and adults, have received
courses of Tamiflu through the Government's National Pandemic Flu Service
for England.


Today's study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), warned that
Tamiflu can cause vomiting in some children, which can lead to dehydration
and the need for hospital treatment.


The researchers said children should not be given the drug if they have a
mild form of the illness although they urged parents and GPs to remain
vigilant for signs of complications. Parents of children with a compromised
immune system or a condition like cystic fibrosis should discuss the harms
and benefits with their GP, they said.


But overall, the researchers said, children who were otherwise healthy could
suffer more harm than benefit from taking Tamiflu or another anti-viral,
Relenza.
They found the drugs had little or no effect on asthma flare-ups, ear
infections or the likelihood of a youngster needing antibiotics.


The researchers also found that using anti-virals preventatively had little
effect - reducing transmission of flu by 8 per cent.
This means 13 children would have to be treated to prevent one additional
case of the flu.
However, anti-virals could reduce symptoms by between half a day and one
day.


Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at Oxford University, said the
current policy of giving Tamiflu for mild illness was an "inappropriate
strategy".
He added: "The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in
symptomatic benefits."
He and Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and senior clinical scientist at Oxford
University, analysed four studies involving children aged one to 12.


The children were being treated for normal seasonal flu but Dr Thompson said
the findings would extend to the current swine flu pandemic.
"I don't think we have got any reason to think our results would be any
different," he said.
"<strong>The current swine flu is generally a mild flu illness...it does not seem
that different from current seasonal flu</strong>.
"We would be happy to say our results apply to the current swine flu
strain."


He said children with mild symptoms should be treated in the same way as if
they had any other mild flu - with drinks to cool high temperatures and
rest.


Dr Heneghan said the <strong>only</strong> benefit found in the study was that children were
back to normal half a day to one day earlier if taking Tamiflu or Relenza.
He said his advice to GPs was "not to rely on Tamiflu as a treatment to
reduce complications" or to think of it as a "magic bullet".
And he warned that widespread use of Tamiflu could result in the flu
becoming resistant to the drug.


"What is a problem going forward - like with antibiotics - is you run into a
resistance issue.
"Going forward we have a treatment which is ineffective because we've given
it to everybody."


Both researchers called on the Department of Health to review its current
policy.


Dr Thompson said: "It's possible a more conservative strategy (such as)
reserving these anti-viral drugs for people, for children who are more
likely to have complications of the illness might be a more sensible
strategy." Dr Heneghan added: "I think the Government should be looking at
this urgently, this week."


The experts said the studies had been publicly available to the Government
before it formulated its current strategy with regard to Tamiflu.
And they said the Government should have demanded more data from the
pharmaceutical companies which manufacture the drugs - Roche, which makes
Tamiflu, and GlaxoSmithKline, which makes Relenza.


Today's research was published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) and
follows two recent studies which found that more than half of children
taking Tamiflu suffered side-effects such as nausea, insomnia and
nightmares.


Experts from the Health Protection Agency (HPA) found a high proportion of
British schoolchildren reporting problems after taking the anti-viral
preventatively.


The experts behind one of the studies said that although children may have
attributed symptoms which were due to other illnesses to the use of Tamiflu,
that was "unlikely to account for all the symptoms experienced".


That study was carried out in April and May - before the Government decided
to stop using Tamiflu preventatively.


Only those with suspected or confirmed swine flu are now getting the drug
and are being urged to get access to Tamiflu through the Pandemic Flu
Service, which is accessed online or via a telephone helpline.


Children are known to be at high risk of catching the flu, with more than
40% of pre-school children getting the virus and 30% of school-age children
doing so, the researchers said.


A Department of Health spokesman dismissed the researchers' claims that
their findings would also apply to swine flu.
"The BMJ review is based on seasonal flu and not swine flu," he said. "As
the authors note, the extent to which the findings can be applied to the
current pandemic is questionable - after all, we already know that swine flu
behaves differently to seasonal flu, and past pandemics have hit younger
people hardest.


"Whilst there is doubt about how swine flu affects children, we believe a
safety-first approach of offering anti-virals to everyone remains a sensible
and responsible way forward."


He said the policy would be kept under review and people with mild symptoms
"may find bed rest and over-the-counter flu remedies work for them.
"But for those who experience severe symptoms, the best scientific advice
tells us that Tamiflu should still be taken as soon as possible - and to
suggest otherwise is potentially dangerous. "If people are in any doubt
about whether to take Tamiflu, they should contact their GP."


Liberal Democrat health spokesman Norman Lamb said: "This analysis needs to
be taken extremely seriously and demands an immediate response from the
Government. "An urgent review must be carried out into whether the benefits
of prescribing certain anti-viral drugs are worth the risks when it comes to
our children's health."


A total of 36 people in England have died after getting swine flu.


FAIR USE NOTICE: This may contain copyrighted () ) material the use of which
has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such
material is made available for educational purposes, to advance
understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and
social justice issues, etc. It is believed that this constitutes a 'fair
use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C.
section 107 of the US Copyright Law. This material is distributed without
profit. "
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... liday.html
A-level girl planning to be doctor dies from swine flu after coming back from holiday

By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 11:37 AM on 10th August 2009


 
<img height="449" alt="Madelynne Butcher: Died from swine flu after returning from a holiiday in Tenerife" src="http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/08/ ... 33x449.jpg" width="233">
Madelynne Butcher: Died from swine flu after returning from Tenerife

A teenager who hoped to become a doctor has died after getting swine flu, it emerged today.

Madelynne Butcher, 18, fell ill after returning from a holiday in Tenerife to celebrate finishing her exams.

The student became sick and short of breath and was eventually taken to Southampton General Hospital.

<strong>She was given Tamiflu and medics had to sedate her.</strong>

<strong>But her condition deteriorated and after two weeks she was transferred to Glenfield Hospital in Leicester for specialist treatment.</strong>

<strong>She died a week later.</strong>

Her mother Beverley and father Alan went to visit her in Leicester last Thursday, but were told their daughter had died..

<strong>A post-mortem examination has yet to establish the exact cause of death</strong>, but Miss Butcher had been diagnosed as having swine flu by doctors in Southampton.

The schoolgirl from Sholing, Southampton, had been due to study biology at the University of East Anglia.

Mrs Butcher said: She loved every minute of life. Madelynne was so adorable, everyone who met her thought so and thats what all her friends have been saying.

She was a very outgoing, easygoing and thoughtful, always thoughtful to her friends and family.

A total of 36 people in the UK have died after getting swine flu, according to the latest Department of Health figures."
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 11th, 2009, 11:48 am #8

http://groups.google.com/group/misc.act ... 6423b5da6d

ALLIANCE FOR HUMAN RESEARCH PROTECTION
Promoting Openness, Full Disclosure, and Accountability
http://www.ahrp.org


FYI


<strong>An Oxford University study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ),
led by David Mant, analyzed four studies involving children aged one to 12
who were prescribed Tamiflu. They found that the risks associated with
Tamiflu are not outweighed by the insignificant benefits:
</strong>

"<strong>The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in symptomatic
benefits</strong>."


The researchers reviewed four earlier clinical trials -- two with Relenza
and two with Tamiflu -- for influenza treatment covering 1,766 children 12
or younger. More half had confirmed cases of type A flu. They also reviewed
three other trials in which the drugs were given to children who had been
exposed to the virus but showed no symptoms.


The BMJ report comes 10 days after Britain's Health Protection Agency (HPA)
reported that <strong>more than half of 248 students given Tamiflu after a classmate
fell ill with swine flu suffered adverse side-effects such as nausea,
insomnia and nightmares.</strong> Most of the students did not have the flu when they
were given the drug. Thus, it <strong>cannot be argued--as the manufacturer of
Tamiflu does</strong>--that the symptoms were illness-related.


The UK Independent reports (below) that "the researchers found that using
anti-virals preventatively had little effect - reducing transmission of flu
by 8 per cent.
This means 13 children would have to be treated to prevent one additional
case of the flu."


Given the minimal benefit--reduction of flu symptoms by half a day (at most
one day), they conclude that a "more conservative strategy" is probably in
order.


Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at Oxford University, who was
also involved in the study, said the current policy of giving Tamiflu for
mild illness was an "inappropriate strategy:"


The study authors noted that the children were being treated for normal
seasonal flu but Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and senior clinical scientist at
Oxford University, said the findings would extend to the current swine flu
pandemic. "I don't think we have got any reason to think our results would
be any different," he said.
"The current swine flu is generally a mild flu illness...it does not seem
that different from current seasonal flu. We would be happy to say our
results apply to the current swine flu strain."


However, the UK Department of Health spokesman dismissed the Oxford
researchers' claims that their findings would also apply to swine flu.
"The BMJ review is based on seasonal flu and not swine flu," he said. "As
the authors note, the extent to which the findings can be applied to the
current pandemic is questionable - after all, we already know that swine flu
behaves differently to seasonal flu, and past pandemics have hit younger
people hardest."


"Whilst there is doubt about how swine flu affects children, we believe a
safety-first approach of offering anti-virals to everyone remains a sensible
and responsible way forward."


<strong>An investigation is in order to find what, if any, hidden persuaders
(undisclosed stakes) are at work influencing public health policy--in the
UK, the US, and the UN.
</strong>

Why are public officials promoting the premature, medically unsupportable
use of (1) an inadequately tested vaccine, H1N1, and (2) the use of
anti-viral drugs whose "benefit" vis-`-vis the flu, is merely reduced mild
symptoms by between half a day and one day?


See: Matthew Shun-Shin, Matthew Thompson, Carl Heneghan, Rafael Perera,
Anthony Harnden, David Mant. Neuraminidase inhibitors for treatment and
prophylaxis of influenza in children: systematic review and meta-analysis of
randomised controlled trials, BMJ, Aug 10, 2009 Available free at:
http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/339 ... ndemic_flu


See: http://anthraxvaccine.blogspot.com
See also,  http://www.ahrp.org/cms/content/view/619/9/ and
http://www.ahrp.org/cms/content/view/626/9/


Contact: Vera Hassner Sharav
verac...@ahrp.org
212-595-8974


http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style ... /health-ne...
-give-tamiflu-to-children-1770154.html
THE INDEPENDENT
'Don't give Tamiflu to children'
By Jane Kirby, Press Association
Monday, <strong>10 August 2009 </strong>


"There is a lot of concern amongst health authorities that people might buy
counterfeit drugs"


<strong>Children should not be given the anti-viral drug Tamiflu to combat swine
flu, Oxford University researchers said today.
</strong>They urged the Department of Health to <strong>urgently rethink </strong>its policy on giving
the drugs to youngsters affected by the current flu pandemic.


Some 300,000 people in England, including children and adults, have received
courses of Tamiflu through the Government's National Pandemic Flu Service
for England.


Today's study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), warned that
Tamiflu can cause vomiting in some children, which can lead to dehydration
and the need for hospital treatment.


The researchers said children should not be given the drug if they have a
mild form of the illness although they urged parents and GPs to remain
vigilant for signs of complications. Parents of children with a compromised
immune system or a condition like cystic fibrosis should discuss the harms
and benefits with their GP, they said.


But overall, the researchers said, children who were otherwise healthy could
suffer more harm than benefit from taking Tamiflu or another anti-viral,
Relenza.
They found the drugs had little or no effect on asthma flare-ups, ear
infections or the likelihood of a youngster needing antibiotics.


The researchers also found that using anti-virals preventatively had little
effect - reducing transmission of flu by 8 per cent.
This means 13 children would have to be treated to prevent one additional
case of the flu.
However, anti-virals could reduce symptoms by between half a day and one
day.


Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at Oxford University, said the
current policy of giving Tamiflu for mild illness was an "inappropriate
strategy".
He added: "The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in
symptomatic benefits."
He and Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and senior clinical scientist at Oxford
University, analysed four studies involving children aged one to 12.


The children were being treated for normal seasonal flu but Dr Thompson said
the findings would extend to the current swine flu pandemic.
"I don't think we have got any reason to think our results would be any
different," he said.
"<strong>The current swine flu is generally a mild flu illness...it does not seem
that different from current seasonal flu</strong>.
"We would be happy to say our results apply to the current swine flu
strain."


He said children with mild symptoms should be treated in the same way as if
they had any other mild flu - with drinks to cool high temperatures and
rest.


Dr Heneghan said the <strong>only</strong> benefit found in the study was that children were
back to normal half a day to one day earlier if taking Tamiflu or Relenza.
He said his advice to GPs was "not to rely on Tamiflu as a treatment to
reduce complications" or to think of it as a "magic bullet".
And he warned that widespread use of Tamiflu could result in the flu
becoming resistant to the drug.


"What is a problem going forward - like with antibiotics - is you run into a
resistance issue.
"Going forward we have a treatment which is ineffective because we've given
it to everybody."


Both researchers called on the Department of Health to review its current
policy.


Dr Thompson said: "It's possible a more conservative strategy (such as)
reserving these anti-viral drugs for people, for children who are more
likely to have complications of the illness might be a more sensible
strategy." Dr Heneghan added: "I think the Government should be looking at
this urgently, this week."


The experts said the studies had been publicly available to the Government
before it formulated its current strategy with regard to Tamiflu.
And they said the Government should have demanded more data from the
pharmaceutical companies which manufacture the drugs - Roche, which makes
Tamiflu, and GlaxoSmithKline, which makes Relenza.


Today's research was published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) and
follows two recent studies which found that more than half of children
taking Tamiflu suffered side-effects such as nausea, insomnia and
nightmares.


Experts from the Health Protection Agency (HPA) found a high proportion of
British schoolchildren reporting problems after taking the anti-viral
preventatively.


The experts behind one of the studies said that although children may have
attributed symptoms which were due to other illnesses to the use of Tamiflu,
that was "unlikely to account for all the symptoms experienced".


That study was carried out in April and May - before the Government decided
to stop using Tamiflu preventatively.


Only those with suspected or confirmed swine flu are now getting the drug
and are being urged to get access to Tamiflu through the Pandemic Flu
Service, which is accessed online or via a telephone helpline.


Children are known to be at high risk of catching the flu, with more than
40% of pre-school children getting the virus and 30% of school-age children
doing so, the researchers said.


A Department of Health spokesman dismissed the researchers' claims that
their findings would also apply to swine flu.
"The BMJ review is based on seasonal flu and not swine flu," he said. "As
the authors note, the extent to which the findings can be applied to the
current pandemic is questionable - after all, we already know that swine flu
behaves differently to seasonal flu, and past pandemics have hit younger
people hardest.


"Whilst there is doubt about how swine flu affects children, we believe a
safety-first approach of offering anti-virals to everyone remains a sensible
and responsible way forward."


He said the policy would be kept under review and people with mild symptoms
"may find bed rest and over-the-counter flu remedies work for them.
"But for those who experience severe symptoms, the best scientific advice
tells us that Tamiflu should still be taken as soon as possible - and to
suggest otherwise is potentially dangerous. "If people are in any doubt
about whether to take Tamiflu, they should contact their GP."


Liberal Democrat health spokesman Norman Lamb said: "This analysis needs to
be taken extremely seriously and demands an immediate response from the
Government. "An urgent review must be carried out into whether the benefits
of prescribing certain anti-viral drugs are worth the risks when it comes to
our children's health."


A total of 36 people in England have died after getting swine flu.


FAIR USE NOTICE: This may contain copyrighted () ) material the use of which
has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such
material is made available for educational purposes, to advance
understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and
social justice issues, etc. It is believed that this constitutes a 'fair
use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C.
section 107 of the US Copyright Law. This material is distributed without
profit. "
http://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/view/93 ... -say-docs/
SWINE FLU CURE A DANGER TO KIDS, SAY DOCSimages.dailystar-uk.co.uk/dynamic/1/281x351/93330_1.jpg) no-repeat; FLOAT: left; WIDTH: 281px; HEIGHT: 351px">ABOVE: Tamiflu shouldn't be given to children suffering swine flu, doctors claim 11th August 2009 By <span class="bold">Steve Hughes</span>
Your Shout ( <span class="bigCommentsNum">0</span> )

TAMIFLU is so dangerous it is worse for children than swine flu, say medical experts.






The drug should not be given to youngsters suffering from the virus, they claim.




Scientists at Oxford University issued the warning about the drug, which is being dished out by the NHS to anyone who thinks they have the bug.




It comes after a study published in the British Medical Journal warned Tamiflu causes vomiting and dehydration and can land children in hospital.




The report concludes that overall they will suffer more harm than benefit from taking the drug.




It says they should be left to get over mild cases of the illness by getting plenty of fluids and rest.




Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at the university, said the current policy of giving Tamiflu to everyone was an inappropriate strategy.




He added: The downside outweighs the one-day reduction in symptoms.




The news comes as the dad of a teenager who died after being wrongly diagnosed with swine flu said prescribing Tamiflu over the phone was a dangerous game.




<strong>Charlotte Hartey, 16, from Oswestry, Shrops, was diagnosed over the phone by a local GP and prescribed the drug. </strong>

<strong></strong>

<strong>
</strong>

<strong>But her condition worsened and she was admitted to Royal Shrewsbury Hospital, where she died two days later. </strong>




Dad Karl said: Charlotte was misdiagnosed. She was treated for something she didnt have.




<strong>She actually had tonsillitis </strong>and that led to her developing abscesses in her lungs and blood poisoning as the bacteria spread, which ultimately killed her.




This was a death that shouldnt have happened. No-one should die from tonsillitis in 2009.




He added: Clearly this call centre approach to diagnosing swine flu doesnt work.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 11th, 2009, 12:05 pm #9

http://groups.google.com/group/misc.act ... 6423b5da6d

ALLIANCE FOR HUMAN RESEARCH PROTECTION
Promoting Openness, Full Disclosure, and Accountability
http://www.ahrp.org


FYI


<strong>An Oxford University study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ),
led by David Mant, analyzed four studies involving children aged one to 12
who were prescribed Tamiflu. They found that the risks associated with
Tamiflu are not outweighed by the insignificant benefits:
</strong>

"<strong>The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in symptomatic
benefits</strong>."


The researchers reviewed four earlier clinical trials -- two with Relenza
and two with Tamiflu -- for influenza treatment covering 1,766 children 12
or younger. More half had confirmed cases of type A flu. They also reviewed
three other trials in which the drugs were given to children who had been
exposed to the virus but showed no symptoms.


The BMJ report comes 10 days after Britain's Health Protection Agency (HPA)
reported that <strong>more than half of 248 students given Tamiflu after a classmate
fell ill with swine flu suffered adverse side-effects such as nausea,
insomnia and nightmares.</strong> Most of the students did not have the flu when they
were given the drug. Thus, it <strong>cannot be argued--as the manufacturer of
Tamiflu does</strong>--that the symptoms were illness-related.


The UK Independent reports (below) that "the researchers found that using
anti-virals preventatively had little effect - reducing transmission of flu
by 8 per cent.
This means 13 children would have to be treated to prevent one additional
case of the flu."


Given the minimal benefit--reduction of flu symptoms by half a day (at most
one day), they conclude that a "more conservative strategy" is probably in
order.


Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at Oxford University, who was
also involved in the study, said the current policy of giving Tamiflu for
mild illness was an "inappropriate strategy:"


The study authors noted that the children were being treated for normal
seasonal flu but Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and senior clinical scientist at
Oxford University, said the findings would extend to the current swine flu
pandemic. "I don't think we have got any reason to think our results would
be any different," he said.
"The current swine flu is generally a mild flu illness...it does not seem
that different from current seasonal flu. We would be happy to say our
results apply to the current swine flu strain."


However, the UK Department of Health spokesman dismissed the Oxford
researchers' claims that their findings would also apply to swine flu.
"The BMJ review is based on seasonal flu and not swine flu," he said. "As
the authors note, the extent to which the findings can be applied to the
current pandemic is questionable - after all, we already know that swine flu
behaves differently to seasonal flu, and past pandemics have hit younger
people hardest."


"Whilst there is doubt about how swine flu affects children, we believe a
safety-first approach of offering anti-virals to everyone remains a sensible
and responsible way forward."


<strong>An investigation is in order to find what, if any, hidden persuaders
(undisclosed stakes) are at work influencing public health policy--in the
UK, the US, and the UN.
</strong>

Why are public officials promoting the premature, medically unsupportable
use of (1) an inadequately tested vaccine, H1N1, and (2) the use of
anti-viral drugs whose "benefit" vis-`-vis the flu, is merely reduced mild
symptoms by between half a day and one day?


See: Matthew Shun-Shin, Matthew Thompson, Carl Heneghan, Rafael Perera,
Anthony Harnden, David Mant. Neuraminidase inhibitors for treatment and
prophylaxis of influenza in children: systematic review and meta-analysis of
randomised controlled trials, BMJ, Aug 10, 2009 Available free at:
http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/339 ... ndemic_flu


See: http://anthraxvaccine.blogspot.com
See also,  http://www.ahrp.org/cms/content/view/619/9/ and
http://www.ahrp.org/cms/content/view/626/9/


Contact: Vera Hassner Sharav
verac...@ahrp.org
212-595-8974


http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style ... /health-ne...
-give-tamiflu-to-children-1770154.html
THE INDEPENDENT
'Don't give Tamiflu to children'
By Jane Kirby, Press Association
Monday, <strong>10 August 2009 </strong>


"There is a lot of concern amongst health authorities that people might buy
counterfeit drugs"


<strong>Children should not be given the anti-viral drug Tamiflu to combat swine
flu, Oxford University researchers said today.
</strong>They urged the Department of Health to <strong>urgently rethink </strong>its policy on giving
the drugs to youngsters affected by the current flu pandemic.


Some 300,000 people in England, including children and adults, have received
courses of Tamiflu through the Government's National Pandemic Flu Service
for England.


Today's study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), warned that
Tamiflu can cause vomiting in some children, which can lead to dehydration
and the need for hospital treatment.


The researchers said children should not be given the drug if they have a
mild form of the illness although they urged parents and GPs to remain
vigilant for signs of complications. Parents of children with a compromised
immune system or a condition like cystic fibrosis should discuss the harms
and benefits with their GP, they said.


But overall, the researchers said, children who were otherwise healthy could
suffer more harm than benefit from taking Tamiflu or another anti-viral,
Relenza.
They found the drugs had little or no effect on asthma flare-ups, ear
infections or the likelihood of a youngster needing antibiotics.


The researchers also found that using anti-virals preventatively had little
effect - reducing transmission of flu by 8 per cent.
This means 13 children would have to be treated to prevent one additional
case of the flu.
However, anti-virals could reduce symptoms by between half a day and one
day.


Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at Oxford University, said the
current policy of giving Tamiflu for mild illness was an "inappropriate
strategy".
He added: "The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in
symptomatic benefits."
He and Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and senior clinical scientist at Oxford
University, analysed four studies involving children aged one to 12.


The children were being treated for normal seasonal flu but Dr Thompson said
the findings would extend to the current swine flu pandemic.
"I don't think we have got any reason to think our results would be any
different," he said.
"<strong>The current swine flu is generally a mild flu illness...it does not seem
that different from current seasonal flu</strong>.
"We would be happy to say our results apply to the current swine flu
strain."


He said children with mild symptoms should be treated in the same way as if
they had any other mild flu - with drinks to cool high temperatures and
rest.


Dr Heneghan said the <strong>only</strong> benefit found in the study was that children were
back to normal half a day to one day earlier if taking Tamiflu or Relenza.
He said his advice to GPs was "not to rely on Tamiflu as a treatment to
reduce complications" or to think of it as a "magic bullet".
And he warned that widespread use of Tamiflu could result in the flu
becoming resistant to the drug.


"What is a problem going forward - like with antibiotics - is you run into a
resistance issue.
"Going forward we have a treatment which is ineffective because we've given
it to everybody."


Both researchers called on the Department of Health to review its current
policy.


Dr Thompson said: "It's possible a more conservative strategy (such as)
reserving these anti-viral drugs for people, for children who are more
likely to have complications of the illness might be a more sensible
strategy." Dr Heneghan added: "I think the Government should be looking at
this urgently, this week."


The experts said the studies had been publicly available to the Government
before it formulated its current strategy with regard to Tamiflu.
And they said the Government should have demanded more data from the
pharmaceutical companies which manufacture the drugs - Roche, which makes
Tamiflu, and GlaxoSmithKline, which makes Relenza.


Today's research was published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) and
follows two recent studies which found that more than half of children
taking Tamiflu suffered side-effects such as nausea, insomnia and
nightmares.


Experts from the Health Protection Agency (HPA) found a high proportion of
British schoolchildren reporting problems after taking the anti-viral
preventatively.


The experts behind one of the studies said that although children may have
attributed symptoms which were due to other illnesses to the use of Tamiflu,
that was "unlikely to account for all the symptoms experienced".


That study was carried out in April and May - before the Government decided
to stop using Tamiflu preventatively.


Only those with suspected or confirmed swine flu are now getting the drug
and are being urged to get access to Tamiflu through the Pandemic Flu
Service, which is accessed online or via a telephone helpline.


Children are known to be at high risk of catching the flu, with more than
40% of pre-school children getting the virus and 30% of school-age children
doing so, the researchers said.


A Department of Health spokesman dismissed the researchers' claims that
their findings would also apply to swine flu.
"The BMJ review is based on seasonal flu and not swine flu," he said. "As
the authors note, the extent to which the findings can be applied to the
current pandemic is questionable - after all, we already know that swine flu
behaves differently to seasonal flu, and past pandemics have hit younger
people hardest.


"Whilst there is doubt about how swine flu affects children, we believe a
safety-first approach of offering anti-virals to everyone remains a sensible
and responsible way forward."


He said the policy would be kept under review and people with mild symptoms
"may find bed rest and over-the-counter flu remedies work for them.
"But for those who experience severe symptoms, the best scientific advice
tells us that Tamiflu should still be taken as soon as possible - and to
suggest otherwise is potentially dangerous. "If people are in any doubt
about whether to take Tamiflu, they should contact their GP."


Liberal Democrat health spokesman Norman Lamb said: "This analysis needs to
be taken extremely seriously and demands an immediate response from the
Government. "An urgent review must be carried out into whether the benefits
of prescribing certain anti-viral drugs are worth the risks when it comes to
our children's health."


A total of 36 people in England have died after getting swine flu.


FAIR USE NOTICE: This may contain copyrighted () ) material the use of which
has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such
material is made available for educational purposes, to advance
understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and
social justice issues, etc. It is believed that this constitutes a 'fair
use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C.
section 107 of the US Copyright Law. This material is distributed without
profit. "
Don't they always warn that medicines that are out of date should not be used?  Tamiflu is bad enough as it is, ineffective and with some serious adverse effects.  How much worse will this get as the drugs spend 2 years chemically deteriorating?

 

<strong>http://www.askdocweb.com/tamiflu.html</strong>

<font size="3">"...<strong>Update 5/16/2009</strong> The shelf-life of Tamiflu may be extended. <strong>Europe's London-based drug watchdog has recommended that the shelf life of Roche's Tamiflu should be extended to seven years from five years due to the outbreak of the new H1N1 virus. </strong>Once formally approved by the European Commission, <strong>the new guidelines from the European Medicines Agency </strong>would apply to all newly manufactured Tamiflu capsules, it said. <strong>The watchdog also called for tablets already on the market to be used for up to two more years after their current five-year expiry date during a declared pandemic.</strong> "Patients who have Tamiflu capsules that have recently expired should not dispose of them because they might be needed during a novel influenza A/H1N1 pandemic," the London-based agency said."
</font>
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

August 11th, 2009, 12:21 pm #10

http://groups.google.com/group/misc.act ... 6423b5da6d

ALLIANCE FOR HUMAN RESEARCH PROTECTION
Promoting Openness, Full Disclosure, and Accountability
http://www.ahrp.org


FYI


<strong>An Oxford University study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ),
led by David Mant, analyzed four studies involving children aged one to 12
who were prescribed Tamiflu. They found that the risks associated with
Tamiflu are not outweighed by the insignificant benefits:
</strong>

"<strong>The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in symptomatic
benefits</strong>."


The researchers reviewed four earlier clinical trials -- two with Relenza
and two with Tamiflu -- for influenza treatment covering 1,766 children 12
or younger. More half had confirmed cases of type A flu. They also reviewed
three other trials in which the drugs were given to children who had been
exposed to the virus but showed no symptoms.


The BMJ report comes 10 days after Britain's Health Protection Agency (HPA)
reported that <strong>more than half of 248 students given Tamiflu after a classmate
fell ill with swine flu suffered adverse side-effects such as nausea,
insomnia and nightmares.</strong> Most of the students did not have the flu when they
were given the drug. Thus, it <strong>cannot be argued--as the manufacturer of
Tamiflu does</strong>--that the symptoms were illness-related.


The UK Independent reports (below) that "the researchers found that using
anti-virals preventatively had little effect - reducing transmission of flu
by 8 per cent.
This means 13 children would have to be treated to prevent one additional
case of the flu."


Given the minimal benefit--reduction of flu symptoms by half a day (at most
one day), they conclude that a "more conservative strategy" is probably in
order.


Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at Oxford University, who was
also involved in the study, said the current policy of giving Tamiflu for
mild illness was an "inappropriate strategy:"


The study authors noted that the children were being treated for normal
seasonal flu but Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and senior clinical scientist at
Oxford University, said the findings would extend to the current swine flu
pandemic. "I don't think we have got any reason to think our results would
be any different," he said.
"The current swine flu is generally a mild flu illness...it does not seem
that different from current seasonal flu. We would be happy to say our
results apply to the current swine flu strain."


However, the UK Department of Health spokesman dismissed the Oxford
researchers' claims that their findings would also apply to swine flu.
"The BMJ review is based on seasonal flu and not swine flu," he said. "As
the authors note, the extent to which the findings can be applied to the
current pandemic is questionable - after all, we already know that swine flu
behaves differently to seasonal flu, and past pandemics have hit younger
people hardest."


"Whilst there is doubt about how swine flu affects children, we believe a
safety-first approach of offering anti-virals to everyone remains a sensible
and responsible way forward."


<strong>An investigation is in order to find what, if any, hidden persuaders
(undisclosed stakes) are at work influencing public health policy--in the
UK, the US, and the UN.
</strong>

Why are public officials promoting the premature, medically unsupportable
use of (1) an inadequately tested vaccine, H1N1, and (2) the use of
anti-viral drugs whose "benefit" vis-`-vis the flu, is merely reduced mild
symptoms by between half a day and one day?


See: Matthew Shun-Shin, Matthew Thompson, Carl Heneghan, Rafael Perera,
Anthony Harnden, David Mant. Neuraminidase inhibitors for treatment and
prophylaxis of influenza in children: systematic review and meta-analysis of
randomised controlled trials, BMJ, Aug 10, 2009 Available free at:
http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/339 ... ndemic_flu


See: http://anthraxvaccine.blogspot.com
See also,  http://www.ahrp.org/cms/content/view/619/9/ and
http://www.ahrp.org/cms/content/view/626/9/


Contact: Vera Hassner Sharav
verac...@ahrp.org
212-595-8974


http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style ... /health-ne...
-give-tamiflu-to-children-1770154.html
THE INDEPENDENT
'Don't give Tamiflu to children'
By Jane Kirby, Press Association
Monday, <strong>10 August 2009 </strong>


"There is a lot of concern amongst health authorities that people might buy
counterfeit drugs"


<strong>Children should not be given the anti-viral drug Tamiflu to combat swine
flu, Oxford University researchers said today.
</strong>They urged the Department of Health to <strong>urgently rethink </strong>its policy on giving
the drugs to youngsters affected by the current flu pandemic.


Some 300,000 people in England, including children and adults, have received
courses of Tamiflu through the Government's National Pandemic Flu Service
for England.


Today's study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ), warned that
Tamiflu can cause vomiting in some children, which can lead to dehydration
and the need for hospital treatment.


The researchers said children should not be given the drug if they have a
mild form of the illness although they urged parents and GPs to remain
vigilant for signs of complications. Parents of children with a compromised
immune system or a condition like cystic fibrosis should discuss the harms
and benefits with their GP, they said.


But overall, the researchers said, children who were otherwise healthy could
suffer more harm than benefit from taking Tamiflu or another anti-viral,
Relenza.
They found the drugs had little or no effect on asthma flare-ups, ear
infections or the likelihood of a youngster needing antibiotics.


The researchers also found that using anti-virals preventatively had little
effect - reducing transmission of flu by 8 per cent.
This means 13 children would have to be treated to prevent one additional
case of the flu.
However, anti-virals could reduce symptoms by between half a day and one
day.


Dr Carl Heneghan, a GP and clinical lecturer at Oxford University, said the
current policy of giving Tamiflu for mild illness was an "inappropriate
strategy".
He added: "The downside of the harms outweigh the one-day reduction in
symptomatic benefits."
He and Dr Matthew Thompson, a GP and senior clinical scientist at Oxford
University, analysed four studies involving children aged one to 12.


The children were being treated for normal seasonal flu but Dr Thompson said
the findings would extend to the current swine flu pandemic.
"I don't think we have got any reason to think our results would be any
different," he said.
"<strong>The current swine flu is generally a mild flu illness...it does not seem
that different from current seasonal flu</strong>.
"We would be happy to say our results apply to the current swine flu
strain."


He said children with mild symptoms should be treated in the same way as if
they had any other mild flu - with drinks to cool high temperatures and
rest.


Dr Heneghan said the <strong>only</strong> benefit found in the study was that children were
back to normal half a day to one day earlier if taking Tamiflu or Relenza.
He said his advice to GPs was "not to rely on Tamiflu as a treatment to
reduce complications" or to think of it as a "magic bullet".
And he warned that widespread use of Tamiflu could result in the flu
becoming resistant to the drug.


"What is a problem going forward - like with antibiotics - is you run into a
resistance issue.
"Going forward we have a treatment which is ineffective because we've given
it to everybody."


Both researchers called on the Department of Health to review its current
policy.


Dr Thompson said: "It's possible a more conservative strategy (such as)
reserving these anti-viral drugs for people, for children who are more
likely to have complications of the illness might be a more sensible
strategy." Dr Heneghan added: "I think the Government should be looking at
this urgently, this week."


The experts said the studies had been publicly available to the Government
before it formulated its current strategy with regard to Tamiflu.
And they said the Government should have demanded more data from the
pharmaceutical companies which manufacture the drugs - Roche, which makes
Tamiflu, and GlaxoSmithKline, which makes Relenza.


Today's research was published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) and
follows two recent studies which found that more than half of children
taking Tamiflu suffered side-effects such as nausea, insomnia and
nightmares.


Experts from the Health Protection Agency (HPA) found a high proportion of
British schoolchildren reporting problems after taking the anti-viral
preventatively.


The experts behind one of the studies said that although children may have
attributed symptoms which were due to other illnesses to the use of Tamiflu,
that was "unlikely to account for all the symptoms experienced".


That study was carried out in April and May - before the Government decided
to stop using Tamiflu preventatively.


Only those with suspected or confirmed swine flu are now getting the drug
and are being urged to get access to Tamiflu through the Pandemic Flu
Service, which is accessed online or via a telephone helpline.


Children are known to be at high risk of catching the flu, with more than
40% of pre-school children getting the virus and 30% of school-age children
doing so, the researchers said.


A Department of Health spokesman dismissed the researchers' claims that
their findings would also apply to swine flu.
"The BMJ review is based on seasonal flu and not swine flu," he said. "As
the authors note, the extent to which the findings can be applied to the
current pandemic is questionable - after all, we already know that swine flu
behaves differently to seasonal flu, and past pandemics have hit younger
people hardest.


"Whilst there is doubt about how swine flu affects children, we believe a
safety-first approach of offering anti-virals to everyone remains a sensible
and responsible way forward."


He said the policy would be kept under review and people with mild symptoms
"may find bed rest and over-the-counter flu remedies work for them.
"But for those who experience severe symptoms, the best scientific advice
tells us that Tamiflu should still be taken as soon as possible - and to
suggest otherwise is potentially dangerous. "If people are in any doubt
about whether to take Tamiflu, they should contact their GP."


Liberal Democrat health spokesman Norman Lamb said: "This analysis needs to
be taken extremely seriously and demands an immediate response from the
Government. "An urgent review must be carried out into whether the benefits
of prescribing certain anti-viral drugs are worth the risks when it comes to
our children's health."


A total of 36 people in England have died after getting swine flu.


FAIR USE NOTICE: This may contain copyrighted () ) material the use of which
has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such
material is made available for educational purposes, to advance
understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and
social justice issues, etc. It is believed that this constitutes a 'fair
use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C.
section 107 of the US Copyright Law. This material is distributed without
profit. "

http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Pharmacy/Pag ... tions.aspx<a href="http://www.nhs.uk/NHSChoices/shared/RSS ... cines"></a>
<img alt="" src="http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Pharmacy/Pub ... 77x171.jpg">
"<strong>To get the most from medicines, its important to use them properly. Pharmacist Sunita Behl answers questions about medicines youre likely to have at home.</strong>

If they're used wrongly many medicines can do more harm than good. In extreme cases, overdoses of some household medicines can kill...."

"...Its best to keep medicines in their original packaging, with the instruction leaflet still inside the packet. <strong>Be aware that medicines, like food, have an expiry date.</strong> <strong>You should never take medicine after it has expired.</strong> Do not put it in the bin or flush it down the toilet, either. Instead, take it to your pharmacist who can dispose of it...."
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