A touching message from Pfizer's CEO Jeff Kindler

A touching message from Pfizer's CEO Jeff Kindler

Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

December 15th, 2009, 6:11 pm #1


http://behavioralhealthcentral.com/inde ... -conn.html
Pfizer's Kindler warns against fueling public's anger: Citizens are fed up with corporate, government ethics lapses, CEO says [The Day, New London, Conn.] <img border="0" alt="" src="http://cmsmarketingexperts.com/www/imag ... 6cb5a7.jpg" width="175" height="175"> <img alt="" src="http://cmsmarketingexperts.com/www/deli ... 8d637d6cce" width="0" height="0">
Dec. 2--BOSTON -- Three months after his company paid the largest criminal fine in U.S. history, Pfizer Inc. chief executive Jeffrey B. Kindler called on government and <span class="kLink">business</span> leaders Tuesday to face up to the "real and legitimate anger" of citizens fed up with ethics breaches.

"If we fail to change, the future will not be pretty -- for business or for society as a whole," Kindler said in a keynote address to the Boston College Chief Executives' Club at the Boston Harbor Hotel. "People have had enough, and the backlash is real."

Kindler told the luncheon <span class="kLink">meeting</span> of about 250 chief executives in the Boston area that a recent survey found two-thirds of the American people now have less trust in <span class="kLink">corporations</span> than they did a year ago -- and the decline in their faith in government and public officials has been even more drastic.

"<strong>When the majority don't trust you, they will find a way to force you to change</strong>," he said. These changes, he added, could include limits on businesses' licenses to operate and might affect private-sector innovation.

Pfizer, he acknowledged, has had ethical lapses as well, capped by the $2.3 billion in fines imposed in September for the company's<strong> illegal </strong><span class="kLink"><strong>marketing</strong></span><strong> of various drugs</strong>. <strong>The company's $1.2 billion criminal fine was the largest corporate penalty in U.S. history</strong>.

"It was a real blow to our employees," Kindler said. "It did not reflect the company we all knew."

The government of Switzerland also fined Pfizer and two other firms a total of $5.7 million Tuesday for alleged price-fixing of erectile dysfunction drugs.

Kindler said he understood those in the audience who might wonder, in the wake of Pfizer's own ethical problems, "<strong>Who are you to talk about trust</strong>?"

But he said Pfizer has changed. Golf trips, fancy dinners and tchotchkes left for doctors are now out, and there are fewer company sales representatives in the waiting rooms. Results of clinical trials are now posted for all to see.

Kindler also said Pfizer has been pushing for a stronger Food and Drug Administration, the federal agency that regulates pharmaceutical companies and approves new medicines. Regulators that are not affected by political considerations, he said, will help restore trust in the drug-approval process.

"How many businesses do you know that want a stronger regulator? We do," he said.

Kindler said Pfizer also has been pushing for health care reform. He called the current health care system in the United States unsustainable.

"In the long run, I'm a big believer we must improve the system," he said. "It's ultimately good for our business."

Kindler said in answer to a question from the audience that he could not predict the direction of employment at Pfizer's Massachusetts research sites in Cambridge and Andover, but he pointed out that drug companies have cut between 130,000 and 140,000 jobs in the past year. Some of those cuts have come with three major pharmaceutical mergers announced this year, including Pfizer's $67 billion buyout of Wyeth Pharmaceuticals.

Reductions announced this year hit local Pfizer R&D campuses in New London and Groton hard, with at least 500 losing their jobs. Pfizer just last month announced it will be vacating its former world research-and-development headquarters in New London within two years, but promised that its local work force of about 4,900 would survive largely intact.

"It's a very, very challenging time for our industry," Kindler said. "R&D has gotten very expensive and very challenging."

In fact, he said, new drugs that make it to market often take 10 years and cost more than $1 billion to develop. For every remedy that makes it to market, 10,000 other drugs are tested and fail, he said.

Speaking with reporters after his address, Kindler addressed company priorities in only the broadest of terms. He did not offer specifics, for instance, on why Pfizer decided to vacate its New London site.

"We undertook a review globally of all our R&D sites around the world and decided the best of the (alternatives)," he said. "There were a host of factors ... but we made a very substantial commitment to Connecticut."

Asked whether a drug firm can ever grow too big, Kindler said, "Size can be a problem if you don't utilize it well." Concern over size, he said, is what led Pfizer to develop <span class="kLink">smaller </span><span class="kLink">business</span> units within the organization.

"The organization we've created is dedicated to the spirit of small and the power of size," he said.  "

 

Hmm.  

Zoloft suicidal and homicidal ideation coded as nausea springs to mind (amongst other things).  Waiting with baited breath to hear an open admission of miscoding from the new, improved, ethical Pfizer, and the release of Christopher Pittman and others from the jails where the miscoding artistes and their accomplices should be. 

 
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

December 15th, 2009, 6:18 pm #2


"...Citizens are fed up with corporate, government ethics lapses, CEO says..."

 

Once again, extracts of correspondence from Professor David Healy to the UK drug regulatory body, the MHRA:

http://www.socialaudit.org.uk/58096-DH%20to%20WARK.htm

"...Reports on these trials list patients who have committed suicide, and list those patients as being of a certain age and as having committed suicide at a certain point during the trial, when the patient in question has a very different age and the event in question happened at a completely different point during the trial...".

"...Miscoding of suicidal act as emotional lability..."

" ...Lilly have resorted to treatment non-response and a range of other headings to code what happened..." [re coding/mislabelling suicidal acts happening on clinical trials]

"...records on Prozac, Seroxat/Paxil and Lustral/Zoloft, you will find cases of homicidality coded as nausea for instance..."

"...Discontinuation of patients from studies for primary adverse effects such as nausea when in fact there has been a suicidal act;..."

"...But it is also worth adding specifically that this has been a feature of all trials of Zoloft/Lustral, Seroxat/Paxil and Prozac throughout, as far as I can make out... "



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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

December 15th, 2009, 6:22 pm #3


as he killed his loved grandparents after only a few weeks on Zoloft - at aged 12.  All Pfizer needs to do is admit to the world what they did and how their zoloft defense manual was full of ethic lapses, so that those in jail on zoloft-induced homicidality can be released.

http://www.socialaudit.org.uk/58096-DH%20to%20WARK.htm



"...records on Prozac, Seroxat/Paxil and Lustral/Zoloft, you will find cases of homicidality coded as nausea for instance..."

"...Discontinuation of patients from studies for primary adverse effects such as nausea when in fact there has been a suicidal act;..."

"...But it is also worth adding specifically that this has been a<strong> feature of all trials of Zoloft/</strong>Lustral, Seroxat/Paxil and Prozac throughout, as far as I can make out... "



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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

December 15th, 2009, 6:25 pm #4

So kids (and adults) like Christopher will still end up spending the latter part of their childhood and a lot of their adulthood seeing nothing but prison walls and brutality.
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

December 15th, 2009, 6:30 pm #5


Because without real Pfizer ethics their consumers will continue to die.
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

December 15th, 2009, 6:47 pm #6

"...Citizens are fed up with corporate, government ethics lapses, CEO says..."

 

Once again, extracts of correspondence from Professor David Healy to the UK drug regulatory body, the MHRA:

http://www.socialaudit.org.uk/58096-DH%20to%20WARK.htm

"...Reports on these trials list patients who have committed suicide, and list those patients as being of a certain age and as having committed suicide at a certain point during the trial, when the patient in question has a very different age and the event in question happened at a completely different point during the trial...".

"...Miscoding of suicidal act as emotional lability..."

" ...Lilly have resorted to treatment non-response and a range of other headings to code what happened..." [re coding/mislabelling suicidal acts happening on clinical trials]

"...records on Prozac, Seroxat/Paxil and Lustral/Zoloft, you will find cases of homicidality coded as nausea for instance..."

"...Discontinuation of patients from studies for primary adverse effects such as nausea when in fact there has been a suicidal act;..."

"...But it is also worth adding specifically that this has been a feature of all trials of Zoloft/Lustral, Seroxat/Paxil and Prozac throughout, as far as I can make out... "


understands the word 'ethics' and means for Pfizer to become a good, honest, drug company.

http://www.ssri-uksupport.com/christopherpittman.html
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

December 15th, 2009, 7:14 pm #7


He's been in juvenile and adult prisons since aged 12.

Every day that he is there and people remain free who miscoded (lied) about zoloft causing nausea rather than homidical (and suicidal) ideation is a travesty of justice and proof that Pfizer have NO ethics, no conscience, no concern for life.

The only thing that will bring trust back to Pfizer is when they admit openly what they have done, put things right for people like Chrisopher, and show us all that they have well and truly changed.

In the meantime, its up to <strong>everyone</strong> that cares to keep up the pressure, fear of which I suspect is the basis of Kindler's speech. 

In that speech he said: 

"When the majority don't trust you, <strong>they will find a way to force you to change</strong>."

(http://behavioralhealthcentral.com/inde ... -conn.html )
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

December 15th, 2009, 7:34 pm #8

http://behavioralhealthcentral.com/inde ... -conn.html
Pfizer's Kindler warns against fueling public's anger: Citizens are fed up with corporate, government ethics lapses, CEO says [The Day, New London, Conn.] <img border="0" alt="" src="http://cmsmarketingexperts.com/www/imag ... 6cb5a7.jpg" width="175" height="175"> <img alt="" src="http://cmsmarketingexperts.com/www/deli ... 8d637d6cce" width="0" height="0">
Dec. 2--BOSTON -- Three months after his company paid the largest criminal fine in U.S. history, Pfizer Inc. chief executive Jeffrey B. Kindler called on government and <span class="kLink">business</span> leaders Tuesday to face up to the "real and legitimate anger" of citizens fed up with ethics breaches.

"If we fail to change, the future will not be pretty -- for business or for society as a whole," Kindler said in a keynote address to the Boston College Chief Executives' Club at the Boston Harbor Hotel. "People have had enough, and the backlash is real."

Kindler told the luncheon <span class="kLink">meeting</span> of about 250 chief executives in the Boston area that a recent survey found two-thirds of the American people now have less trust in <span class="kLink">corporations</span> than they did a year ago -- and the decline in their faith in government and public officials has been even more drastic.

"<strong>When the majority don't trust you, they will find a way to force you to change</strong>," he said. These changes, he added, could include limits on businesses' licenses to operate and might affect private-sector innovation.

Pfizer, he acknowledged, has had ethical lapses as well, capped by the $2.3 billion in fines imposed in September for the company's<strong> illegal </strong><span class="kLink"><strong>marketing</strong></span><strong> of various drugs</strong>. <strong>The company's $1.2 billion criminal fine was the largest corporate penalty in U.S. history</strong>.

"It was a real blow to our employees," Kindler said. "It did not reflect the company we all knew."

The government of Switzerland also fined Pfizer and two other firms a total of $5.7 million Tuesday for alleged price-fixing of erectile dysfunction drugs.

Kindler said he understood those in the audience who might wonder, in the wake of Pfizer's own ethical problems, "<strong>Who are you to talk about trust</strong>?"

But he said Pfizer has changed. Golf trips, fancy dinners and tchotchkes left for doctors are now out, and there are fewer company sales representatives in the waiting rooms. Results of clinical trials are now posted for all to see.

Kindler also said Pfizer has been pushing for a stronger Food and Drug Administration, the federal agency that regulates pharmaceutical companies and approves new medicines. Regulators that are not affected by political considerations, he said, will help restore trust in the drug-approval process.

"How many businesses do you know that want a stronger regulator? We do," he said.

Kindler said Pfizer also has been pushing for health care reform. He called the current health care system in the United States unsustainable.

"In the long run, I'm a big believer we must improve the system," he said. "It's ultimately good for our business."

Kindler said in answer to a question from the audience that he could not predict the direction of employment at Pfizer's Massachusetts research sites in Cambridge and Andover, but he pointed out that drug companies have cut between 130,000 and 140,000 jobs in the past year. Some of those cuts have come with three major pharmaceutical mergers announced this year, including Pfizer's $67 billion buyout of Wyeth Pharmaceuticals.

Reductions announced this year hit local Pfizer R&D campuses in New London and Groton hard, with at least 500 losing their jobs. Pfizer just last month announced it will be vacating its former world research-and-development headquarters in New London within two years, but promised that its local work force of about 4,900 would survive largely intact.

"It's a very, very challenging time for our industry," Kindler said. "R&D has gotten very expensive and very challenging."

In fact, he said, new drugs that make it to market often take 10 years and cost more than $1 billion to develop. For every remedy that makes it to market, 10,000 other drugs are tested and fail, he said.

Speaking with reporters after his address, Kindler addressed company priorities in only the broadest of terms. He did not offer specifics, for instance, on why Pfizer decided to vacate its New London site.

"We undertook a review globally of all our R&D sites around the world and decided the best of the (alternatives)," he said. "There were a host of factors ... but we made a very substantial commitment to Connecticut."

Asked whether a drug firm can ever grow too big, Kindler said, "Size can be a problem if you don't utilize it well." Concern over size, he said, is what led Pfizer to develop <span class="kLink">smaller </span><span class="kLink">business</span> units within the organization.

"The organization we've created is dedicated to the spirit of small and the power of size," he said.  "

 

Hmm.  

Zoloft suicidal and homicidal ideation coded as nausea springs to mind (amongst other things).  Waiting with baited breath to hear an open admission of miscoding from the new, improved, ethical Pfizer, and the release of Christopher Pittman and others from the jails where the miscoding artistes and their accomplices should be. 

 
<strong>Christopher aged 12 with his much loved grandfather, not long before being given Zoloft for a few weeks during which time he became homicidal and killed both grandfather and grandmother:</strong>

<img alt="chrisbigfish.jpg" src="http://www.network54.com/Realm/peageepi ... igfish.jpg"> 

<strong>After spending 3 years of juvenile prison, here is Christopher aged 15  in an Adult Court where he was sentenced to 30 years in an adult prison for a homicide as a child that Pfizer's ethics lapses with Zoloft - Lustral in the UK - caused:</strong>

<img alt="christophertakesrap.jpg" src="http://www.network54.com/Realm/peageepi ... kesrap.jpg"> 

<strong>If that was your child, or your brother, how much trust would you have in Pfizer?</strong>
Last edited by SSRIAdmin on December 16th, 2009, 1:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

December 15th, 2009, 7:39 pm #9

http://behavioralhealthcentral.com/inde ... -conn.html
Pfizer's Kindler warns against fueling public's anger: Citizens are fed up with corporate, government ethics lapses, CEO says [The Day, New London, Conn.] <img border="0" alt="" src="http://cmsmarketingexperts.com/www/imag ... 6cb5a7.jpg" width="175" height="175"> <img alt="" src="http://cmsmarketingexperts.com/www/deli ... 8d637d6cce" width="0" height="0">
Dec. 2--BOSTON -- Three months after his company paid the largest criminal fine in U.S. history, Pfizer Inc. chief executive Jeffrey B. Kindler called on government and <span class="kLink">business</span> leaders Tuesday to face up to the "real and legitimate anger" of citizens fed up with ethics breaches.

"If we fail to change, the future will not be pretty -- for business or for society as a whole," Kindler said in a keynote address to the Boston College Chief Executives' Club at the Boston Harbor Hotel. "People have had enough, and the backlash is real."

Kindler told the luncheon <span class="kLink">meeting</span> of about 250 chief executives in the Boston area that a recent survey found two-thirds of the American people now have less trust in <span class="kLink">corporations</span> than they did a year ago -- and the decline in their faith in government and public officials has been even more drastic.

"<strong>When the majority don't trust you, they will find a way to force you to change</strong>," he said. These changes, he added, could include limits on businesses' licenses to operate and might affect private-sector innovation.

Pfizer, he acknowledged, has had ethical lapses as well, capped by the $2.3 billion in fines imposed in September for the company's<strong> illegal </strong><span class="kLink"><strong>marketing</strong></span><strong> of various drugs</strong>. <strong>The company's $1.2 billion criminal fine was the largest corporate penalty in U.S. history</strong>.

"It was a real blow to our employees," Kindler said. "It did not reflect the company we all knew."

The government of Switzerland also fined Pfizer and two other firms a total of $5.7 million Tuesday for alleged price-fixing of erectile dysfunction drugs.

Kindler said he understood those in the audience who might wonder, in the wake of Pfizer's own ethical problems, "<strong>Who are you to talk about trust</strong>?"

But he said Pfizer has changed. Golf trips, fancy dinners and tchotchkes left for doctors are now out, and there are fewer company sales representatives in the waiting rooms. Results of clinical trials are now posted for all to see.

Kindler also said Pfizer has been pushing for a stronger Food and Drug Administration, the federal agency that regulates pharmaceutical companies and approves new medicines. Regulators that are not affected by political considerations, he said, will help restore trust in the drug-approval process.

"How many businesses do you know that want a stronger regulator? We do," he said.

Kindler said Pfizer also has been pushing for health care reform. He called the current health care system in the United States unsustainable.

"In the long run, I'm a big believer we must improve the system," he said. "It's ultimately good for our business."

Kindler said in answer to a question from the audience that he could not predict the direction of employment at Pfizer's Massachusetts research sites in Cambridge and Andover, but he pointed out that drug companies have cut between 130,000 and 140,000 jobs in the past year. Some of those cuts have come with three major pharmaceutical mergers announced this year, including Pfizer's $67 billion buyout of Wyeth Pharmaceuticals.

Reductions announced this year hit local Pfizer R&D campuses in New London and Groton hard, with at least 500 losing their jobs. Pfizer just last month announced it will be vacating its former world research-and-development headquarters in New London within two years, but promised that its local work force of about 4,900 would survive largely intact.

"It's a very, very challenging time for our industry," Kindler said. "R&D has gotten very expensive and very challenging."

In fact, he said, new drugs that make it to market often take 10 years and cost more than $1 billion to develop. For every remedy that makes it to market, 10,000 other drugs are tested and fail, he said.

Speaking with reporters after his address, Kindler addressed company priorities in only the broadest of terms. He did not offer specifics, for instance, on why Pfizer decided to vacate its New London site.

"We undertook a review globally of all our R&D sites around the world and decided the best of the (alternatives)," he said. "There were a host of factors ... but we made a very substantial commitment to Connecticut."

Asked whether a drug firm can ever grow too big, Kindler said, "Size can be a problem if you don't utilize it well." Concern over size, he said, is what led Pfizer to develop <span class="kLink">smaller </span><span class="kLink">business</span> units within the organization.

"The organization we've created is dedicated to the spirit of small and the power of size," he said.  "

 

Hmm.  

Zoloft suicidal and homicidal ideation coded as nausea springs to mind (amongst other things).  Waiting with baited breath to hear an open admission of miscoding from the new, improved, ethical Pfizer, and the release of Christopher Pittman and others from the jails where the miscoding artistes and their accomplices should be. 

 
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/stor ... Id=3914957
Losing Julie: Teen's Suicide Blamed on Zoloft
by <span>Joanne Silberner</span>

September 13, 2004
<a></a> <img alt="Julie Woodward, 17, committed suicide one week after she began taking Zoloft." src="http://media.npr.org/programs/morning/f ... 630989&s=1" width="138"> <span class="creditwrap"><span class="credit">Courtesy Tom and Kathy Woodward</span></span>
Julie Woodward, 17, committed suicide one week after she began taking Zoloft.
text size<a>A</a><a>A</a><a>A</a><span class="date">September 13, 2004</span>
Doctors have written millions of prescriptions for antidepressants called SSRIs for American children. But that practice has become controversial in light of research that suggests these drugs may increase the risk of suicide attempts and suicidal thinking in children and teens.

Some parents credit those medicines with saving their children from depression, but others say the drugs have caused suicides. On Monday and Tuesday, the Food and Drug Administration holds hearings on the subject.

In the first of two reports, NPR's Joanne Silberner profiles Tom and Kathy Woodward, who blame SSRIs for the death of their 17-year-old daughter, Julie. She committed suicide seven days after she began taking Zoloft. "

 

<strong>If that was your daughter, or your sister, how much trust would you have in Pfizer?</strong>
<span class="date"></span> 
Last edited by SSRIAdmin on December 16th, 2009, 1:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

December 16th, 2009, 12:22 pm #10

Because without real Pfizer ethics their consumers will continue to die.
http://www.theday.com/article/20091204/OP01/312049946
</h1><h1>"Fear inspires Pfizer reformPublished 12/04/2009 12:00 AMUpdated 12/04/2009 02:13 AM
It is great to hear Pfizer CEO Jeffrey B. Kindler's newfound appreciation for corporate honesty. Mr. Kindler's motivations, however, appear more business-oriented than principled. In so many words, Mr. Kindler told fellow chief executives that ethical lapses are bad for business.

"When the majority don't trust you, they will find a way to force you to change," Mr. Kindler told the assembled multimillionaires at the Boston College Chief Executives' Club on Tuesday at the Boston Harbor Hotel.

Mr. Kindler understands that the image of the corporate giants has taken a hit. How could it not, given the hundreds of billions of dollars in taxpayer bailouts of financial leviathans that lavishly awarded those who pursued reckless but lucrative investment strategies, or the massive layoffs even as executives enjoy seven- and eight-figure bonuses, or the general "let them eat cake" attitude displayed toward the middle class?

In September Pfizer was hit with $2.3 billion in federal fines for the illegal marketing of various drugs, including promoting the use of drugs in ways not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. On the day of Mr. Kindler's speech, Swiss authorities fined Pfizer and two other drug manufacturers $5.7 million for the price-fixing of erectile dysfunction drugs.

Mr. Kindler, it appears, fears that if corporations don't clean up their act the public will demand onerous regulations that could hinder creativity in the private sector when it comes to developing products, improving efficiency and pursuing innovation.

New London certainly will be a hard sell for Mr. Kindler. Pfizer recently announced it will vacate by 2011 its research-and-development headquarters in the city, the year its decade of property tax breaks expires. It is a business decision, said Mr. Kindler, a way of trimming excess after the recent merger with Wyeth Pharmaceuticals. Some might argue, however, that after benefiting from $100 million in government incentives, an ethical corporation might feel an obligation to stick around.

There is the rub. Is ethical behavior simply staying within the confines of the law, or is it something more? Certainly Pfizer's donations of medicines to developing countries, its commitment to diversity in the workplace and its allowance of flex time to meet the needs of families are admirable. But its willingness to cut regulatory corners to market drugs and itss aggressive job-cutting send a different message.

But who can be against a drive for corporate honesty? Certainly not us. We welcome Mr. Kindler's call for reform and wait to see if he is as good as his word. But pardon our skepticism of CEOs bearing promises of ethical purity."
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