650,000 children in England ages 8 - 13 prescribed psych drugs in 2010. 7 fold increase...

650,000 children in England ages 8 - 13 prescribed psych drugs in 2010. 7 fold increase...

Joined: April 19th, 2005, 7:01 pm

February 8th, 2011, 6:14 pm #1


http://www.cypnow.co.uk/news/1053456/pills-for-problems-culture-going-rehab/
The pills-for-problems culture is going to rehab<div class="strong">
If you ever have a spare hour near London's Euston station, I'd recommend the Wellcome Collection.
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A few weeks ago I visited High Society, an exhibition on the history of psychotropic drugs and their legal and illegal use in societies across the world. It was an eye-opening experience. For example, the opium trade had been largely unknown to me, and I had not realised that the opium plantations in India were one of the Empire's most profitable assets. The questions of morals and ethics raised by the exhibition are highly relevant to the present day. With my metaphorical tongue tucked firmly into my cheek, I considered whether this ought to be part of the national curriculum.
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So it was with a new interest that I read that <strong>650,000 children in England between eight and 13 were prescribed Ritalin or similar drugs during 2010. This is a seven-fold increase since 1997 and represents almost 20 per cent of pupils in these age groups.</strong> To bring this closer to home, in a class of 25 pupils in Key Stages 2 or 3, a teacher may expect there to be five children who have been medicated with a psychotropic drug, largely prescribed to deal with ADHD.



This raises several questions. Do the teachers know which children have been medicated in this way? How are the children identified? What research is being done on effectiveness? With such a large sample, the evidence of improved behaviour should be easy to find; but there has not, I believe, been a significant trend of improving behaviour.

So it was with a sense of some relief that I discover that the government is acting against what is called the Prozac generation, and is proposing to reduce substantially the prescribing of such drugs. No doubt there is a saving to be made here - Ritalin costs upwards of £200 per pupil a year so the total annual cost is around £130m - and that will not have escaped the Department of Health. But any move to prescribe on evidence rather than fashion will get my vote.

<em>John Freeman CBE is a former director of children's services and is now a freelance consultant. Read his blog at cypnow.co.uk/freemansthinking</em>
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Joined: April 1st, 2004, 4:56 pm

February 8th, 2011, 7:41 pm #2


Official statistics show a 23-fold difference between the lowest and highest prescribing areas.

extract

 

In the Wirral, the prescribing rate of 144 prescriptions per 1,000 children under the age of 15, compares with an English primary care trust average of 43, figures highlighted by the Health Service Journal show.

Other areas with rates at least double the average included the Isle of Wight, Great Yarmouth and Waveney, County Durham and Medway in Kent, while Stoke-on-Trent had the lowest rate.

 

 

read in full - http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7509576.stm
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Joined: April 1st, 2004, 4:56 pm

February 8th, 2011, 7:55 pm #3

<span class="fieldReference">Request Reference:</span>  507446   
<span class="fieldReference">Request Date:</span>  01 Sep 2010
<span class="fieldWest">Status:</span> Complete <div class="answer">
<span class="fieldReference">Response Date:</span>  21 Sep 2010
A copy of the information is enclosed. From October 2006 PCTs were reorganised and boundaries were moved. The data provided shows the historic PCT. Items is the number of times a product appears on a prescription form. Net Ingredient Cost is the basic price of a drug as stated in Part II Clause 8 of the Drug Tariff .http://www.ppa.org.uk/ppa/edt_intro.htm). The data is based on what was prescribed in England and dispensed in either England, Wales or Scotland. Please note this means that if a prescription was written, but not presented for dispensing or was not submitted to NHS Prescription Services by the dispenser, then it is not included in the data provided The data excludes items prescribed in Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland which have been dispensed in England. The data includes all FP10 prescribing apart from items prescribed by hospitals which have been dispensed in the community. You may also find it useful to refer to the Freedom of Information Frequently Asked Questions available on our website athttp://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/2731.aspx The information supplied to you continues to be protected by the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. You are free to use it for your own purposes, including any non-commercial research you are doing and for the purposes of news reporting. Any other re-use, for example commercial publication, would require the permission of the NHS Business Services Authority (NHSBSA) as copyright holder. Information you receive which is not subject to NHSBSA Copyright continues to be protected by the copyright of the person, or organisation, from which the information originated. You must ensure that you gain their permission before reproducing any third party (non NHSBSA Copyright) information. This information provided is based on our understanding of your request and is provided solely to meet your request. The information should therefore not be regarded as suitable to be used or relied upon by any person or organisation for any purpose or in any context. Any person or organisation that obtains access to the information and chooses to rely on the information will do so at their own risk. The NHS Business Services Authority accepts no responsibility for subsequent use of the information provided.
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