Musical Cues

Dan Hollis
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Dan Hollis
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Joined: 3:03 AM - Sep 28, 2004

8:23 PM - Jan 04, 2008 #1

As recommended by Matt in coordination with my own ideas, I'm starting this thread to list all of the cues as they appear in each episode. This is part of the Episode of the Week project, so I don't expect to add more than one of these per week. The plan, as last I heard, is for Matt to provide a link to the appropriate cue list in the initial post of the corresponding episode thread. That way it will be available up front instead of buried amidst other discussion. I welcome corrections and additions from anyone who has such information. For now I'm going to provide only starting points of the cues, but I'll probably insert ending points if and when I have some more time to do so.

I'm indebted to Paul Giammarco for providing scans of the cue sheets and Cadwallader for examination of manuscript scores at UCLA that has provided additional information. The cue sheets include technical numbers that I don't think are of sufficient interest to the general Cafe membership to warrant inclusion here. I'll stick to cue names, composers, sources, and time stamps.

I'm using the pre-Definitive Edition DVDs for the time stamps. I'll include information on how to adjust for other versions.
Thanks to Dr. Moreau for surprising me with this signature. It beats peach brandy!

"We're sober men and true!" -- "You had to go have him!"
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Dan Hollis
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Dan Hollis
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Joined: 3:03 AM - Sep 28, 2004

8:58 PM - Jan 04, 2008 #2

Musical cues for "Where Is Everybody?"

Original score composed and conducted by BERNARD HERRMANN

Broadcast version
(using starting time stamps from Image Entertainment pre-Definitive Edition)

Episode starts at :00

:37 The Man
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Dissolve to pan across treetops. Pan continues to Mike Ferris, wearing an Air Force jump suit and unaware of even his own name, walking along a dirt road. Rod does his intro, uniquely generic for the series. Ferris starts to hear music in the distance.

:54 Turkish Delight
Eric Cook
Ferris keeps walking as he listens to the distant music. Cut to a cafe that he approaches and enters. He notices the jukebox that's the source of the music. He walks up to the counter and calls into the kitchen.
Ferris: "Say, I noticed there's a town just up the road. What's the name of it? (climbs over counter and heads into kitchen) Customer out -- (walks through empty kitchen and opens back door) Hey, ya got a customer out front! Customer! (closes the door and notices steaming percolator on stove) Ham and eggs." He knocks over an alarm clock whose glass cracks. He picks it up and studies it.
Note: There is a slight overlap with "The Man."

3:09 The Station
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris: "I'm gonna wake up in a minute. I know it. I'm gonna wake up." Lead into commercial.
Note: The pilot doesn't have this cue here. It was apparently copied from a later point in the episode for which Herrmann composed it. As such it provides exit music into the first commercial, much as it would accompany the bumper "The Twilight Zone, brought to you by ..." throughout the series.
Note: Some sources name this "The Station House."

3:17 The Door
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris walks out through the cafe door and down a road. Dissolve to later as he stops when he hears a church bell. Cut to church.

4:12 The Truck
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris walks along the empty streets of Oakwood. He looks into a few empty stores.
Ferris: " Anybody here? Hey! Hey! (sees truck across the street with a woman apparently sitting inside) Hey, Miss? Miss, over here! (starts to cross street) Look, I wonder if you could do me a favor. It's the craziest thing, but I've looked, and I haven't seen anybody around. Maybe they're all asleep or somethin', but, well literally, there hasn't been a soul. (approaches truck) Look, I don't want you to think I'm nuts or anything. It's nothing like that, it's just that, well, it's just that I don't seem to remember who I am. Well, it's a real oddball thing, but when I woke up this morning, and -- well, I didn't exactly wake up. I just ... I just found myself out on that road, walking. Amnesia, isn't that what they call it? Well, that must be what I got, 'cause I just don't remember a thing, and I can't seem to find anybody to ask. You're the first person I've seen. Look, I really don't want you to be frightened or anything, but I was wondering if there's a doctor or --" He opens the passenger side of the truck and the woman -- who turns out to be a mannequin -- falls out. He stares at it.

6:49 The Telephone
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris looks around in puzzlement. He notices that the truck has no ignition key.
Ferris: "You haven't got the ignition key, have you, doll?" He hears the telephone ring in a booth across the street.

8:30 The Phone Book
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris notices the telephone book and looks through it.
Ferris: "Abel, Adams, Allen, Allen. Well, boys, where are you? Where do you boys live? Just in this book? Baker, Bartman, Block, Bellman. Well, gang, who's watching the store? Who's watching any of the stores?"
Note: Some sources name this "The Phone Booth," but I believe "The Phone Book" is the correct title based on the action it accompanies.

10:08 The Station
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris leaves the telephone booth and walks into the police station, where he looks around and sees no one else there.
Ferris: "I wish I could shake that crazy feelin' I'm being watched, listened to. (picks up microphone and speaks into it) Calling all cars! Calling all cars! Unknown man walking around police station. Suspicious looking character. Probably wanted by the F --" He stops when he notices smoke.

11:58 The Cell
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris: "... Time to wake up now!" Noticing that the cell door is closing behind him, he gets out just in time and runs out into the street.
Ferris: "Hey! Hey! Where is everybody?" Lead into commercial.

12:28 The Sun
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Coming out of commercial, Ferris approaches a drugstore and tries to hide when he hears the church bell.
Note: The cue title makes more sense in the pilot version, where the cue runs about a minute longer. See below.

12:49 The Mirror
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris goes into the drugstore and looks around in vain for someone else.
Ferris: "Anybody want a sundae?" He starts to fix himself some ice cream and then notices his mirror image.

14:26 The Book Rack
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris: "... like to wake up now. If I can't wake up, at least I'd like to find somebody to talk to. (looks at basketball schedule) Well, I must be a very imaginative guy. Nobody in the whole bloody world could have a dream as complete as mine. Right down to the last detail." He spins the book racks, noticing one that contains nothing but copies of The Last Man on Earth. Dissolve to him playing tic-tac-toe in the dirt.
Note: The two chords heard as the book rack with The Last Man on Earth stops spinning accompany the mid-episode bumper used in most episodes of the first two seasons and slightly beyond.

15:48 The Lights
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
The outside of the movie theater lights up, and Ferris checks it out. He notices a poster with a man in Air Force fatigues.
Ferris: "Air Force. (notices his own outfit) Air Force. (starts to smile with recognition) Air Force. I'm Air Force! Air Force! I'm in the Air Force! (runs into theater) I'm in the Air Force! --"

17:12 The Film
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris sees that a movie has begun.
Ferris: "Hey! Who's up there? Who's running the pictures? (runs upstairs) Who's up there? Who's running the picture? Hey! Who's up there? Can't you see me? Who's in here?" Looking inside the projection room, he sees no one in there. He runs downstairs and crashes into a mirror.

18:07 The Bicycle
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris comes out of the theater, runs away from it, and eventually trips over a bicycle.

18:33 The Breakdown
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Lying on the ground in agony, Ferris turns face up and sees a large eye staring at him. He screams and runs away, not noticing the eye is merely a sign in an optometrist's shop. He reaches a pole and desperately keeps pressing the traffic control button on it.
Ferris: "Please, somebody help me! Help me! Please, somebody help me! Help me! Help me! Help me! Please, help me! Help me! (traffic signals keep changing) Help me! Please, somebody help me! Help me! Please, somebody help me! Please, somebody help me! (cut to an attentive audience of Air Force officers) Help me! Please, somebody help me! Somebody's looking at me! --"

19:42 The Button
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Cut to Ferris in isolation chamber, pressing a literal panic button and banging his fist against a clock now with broken glass, looking very much like the alarm clock in the cafe. A sergeant and colonel enter.
Sergeant: "Be careful, Colonel! Don't cut his hand. The glass on the clock is broken."
Colonel: "I can see that, Sergeant." He examines Ferris and leaves.
Sergeant: "Sergeant!" Another sergeant enters and helps remove the wires attached to Ferris. Cut to outside chamber as a general arrives.
General: "All right, Colonel. Go!"

22:57 Finale
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris is carried out on a stretcher.
Ferris: "Hey, don't go away up there. (cut to moon) Next time it won't be a dream or a nightmare. Next time it'll be for real. So don't go away. We'll be up there in a little while." Rod does his outro.

* * * * * * * * * * *

Pilot version
(using starting time stamps from Image Entertainment pre-Definitive Edition, preceded in blue with time stamps calculated to begin at :00)

Episode starts at :00/7:37

:33/8:10 The Man
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Dissolve to pan across treetops.
Westbrook Van Voorhis (voice over): "The place is here. The time is now. And the journey into the shadows that we are about to watch could be our journey." Pan continues to Mike Ferris, wearing an Air Force jump suit and unaware of even his own name, walking along a dirt road. He starts to hear music in the distance.

:50/8:27 Turkish Delight
Eric Cook
Ferris keeps walking as he listens to the distant music. Cut to a cafe that he approaches and enters. He notices the jukebox that's the source of the music. He walks up to the counter and calls into the kitchen.
Ferris: "Thing loud enough for ya out here? Think ya can hear it all right? (walks over to jukebox) [unintelligible] for this kind of music, isn't it? (turns down volume) Say, I noticed there's a town just up the road. What's the name of it? (sits and reads menu) Hey, I asked ya a question in there. What's the name of the town? (calls into kitchen) Hey, ya got a customer out front! (climbs over counter and heads into kitchen) Customer out -- (walks through empty kitchen and opens back door) Hey, ya got a customer out front! Customer! (closes the door and notices steaming percolator on stove) Ham and eggs." He knocks over an alarm clock whose glass cracks. He picks it up and studies it.
Note: "The Man" continues for about seven seconds through this cue.

3:58/11:35 Comin' Thro' the Rye
Robert Burns (lyrics; composer is in doubt)
Ferris sings in hope of waking himself up.
Ferris (singing): "If a body greet a body
Comin' thro' the rye.
If a body meet a body
Need a body cry?
Every laddie has --"

4:21/11:58 The Door
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris walks out through the cafe door and down a road. Dissolve to later as he stops when he hears a church bell. Cut to church.

5:21/12:58 The Truck
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris walks along the empty streets of Oakwood. He looks into a few empty stores.
Ferris: " Anybody here? Hey! Hey! (sees truck across the street with a woman apparently sitting inside) Hey, Miss? Miss, over here! (starts to cross street) Look, I wonder if you could do me a favor. It's the craziest thing, but I've looked, and I haven't seen anybody around. Maybe they're all asleep or somethin', but, well literally, there hasn't been a soul. (approaches truck) Look, I don't want you to think I'm nuts or anything. It's nothing like that, it's just that, well, it's just that I don't seem to remember who I am. Well, it's a real oddball thing, but when I woke up this morning, and -- well, I didn't exactly wake up. I just ... I just found myself out on that road, walking. Amnesia, isn't that what they call it? Well, that must be what I got, 'cause I just don't remember a thing, and I can't seem to find anybody to ask. You're the first person I've seen. Look, I really don't want you to be frightened or anything, but I was wondering if there's a doctor or --" He opens the passenger side of the truck and the woman -- who turns out to be a mannequin -- falls out. He stares at it.

7:58/15:35 The Telephone
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris looks around in puzzlement. He notices that the truck has no ignition key.
Ferris: "You haven't got the ignition key, have you, doll?" He hears the telephone ring in a booth across the street.

9:40/17:17 The Phone Book
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris notices the telephone book and looks through it.
Ferris: "Abel, Adams, Allen, Allen. Well, boys, where are you? Where do you boys live? Just in this book? Baker, Bartman, Block, Bellman. Well, gang, who's watching the store? Who's watching any of the stores?"

11:18/18:55 The Station
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris leaves the telephone booth and walks into the police station, where he looks around and sees no one else there.
Ferris: "I wish I could shake that crazy feelin' I'm being watched, listened to. (picks up microphone and speaks into it) Calling all cars! Calling all cars! Unknown man walking around police station. Suspicious looking character. Probably wanted by the F --" He stops when he notices smoke.

13:08/20:45 The Cell
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris: "... Time to wake up now!" Noticing that the cell door is closing behind him, he gets out just in time and runs out into the street.
Ferris: "Hey! Hey! Where is everybody?" Lead into commercial.

13:39/21:16 The Sun
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Coming out of commercial, Ferris walks along a sunlit sidewalk smoking a cigarette and looking around in vain for other signs of life. He stands by a real estate office for a few seconds and throws the cigarette away. He approaches a drugstore and tries to hide when he hears the church bell.

14:58/22:35 The Mirror
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris goes into the drugstore and looks around in vain for someone else.
Ferris: "Anybody want a sundae?" He starts to fix himself some ice cream and then notices his mirror image.

16:34/24:11 The Book Rack
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris: "... like to wake up now. If I can't wake up, at least I'd like to find somebody to talk to. (looks at basketball schedule) Well, I must be a very imaginative guy. Nobody in the whole bloody world could have a dream as complete as mine. Right down to the last detail." He spins the book racks, noticing one that contains nothing but copies of The Last Man on Earth. He walks out into the street toward the police station.
Ferris: "Hey! Hey, anybody? Anybody hear me? Anybody hear me?"
Note: Even though more of this cue is heard here than in the broadcast version, it's still not complete. The full version ends with a three-note bass clarinet phrase that can be heard in "The Howling Man" the first two times Ellington approaches the cell containing the title character.

18:18/25:55 The Lights
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
The outside of the movie theater lights up, and Ferris checks it out. He notices a poster with a man in Air Force fatigues.
Ferris: "Air Force. (notices his own outfit) Air Force. (starts to smile with recognition) Air Force. I'm Air Force! Air Force! I'm in the Air Force! (runs into theater) I'm in the Air Force! --"

19:43/27:20 The Film
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris sees that a movie has begun.
Ferris: "Hey! Who's up there? Who's running the pictures? (runs upstairs) Who's up there? Who's running the picture? Hey! Who's up there? Can't you see me? Who's in here?" Looking inside the projection room, he sees no one in there. He runs downstairs and crashes into a mirror.

20;38/28:15 The Bicycle
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris comes out of the theater, runs away from it, and eventually trips over a bicycle.

21:04/28:41 The Breakdown
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Lying on the ground in agony, Ferris turns face up and sees a large eye staring at him. He screams and runs away, not noticing the eye is merely a sign in an optometrist's shop. He reaches a pole and desperately keeps pressing the traffic control button on it.
Ferris: "Please, somebody help me! Help me! Please, somebody help me! Help me! Help me! Help me! Please, help me! Help me! (traffic signals keep changing) Help me! Please, somebody help me! Help me! Please, somebody help me! Please, somebody help me! (cut to an attentive audience of Air Force officers) Help me! Please, somebody help me! Somebody's looking at me! --"

22:13/29:50 The Button
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Cut to Ferris in isolation chamber, pressing a literal panic button and banging his fist against a clock now with broken glass, looking very much like the alarm clock in the cafe. A sergeant and colonel enter.
Sergeant: "Be careful, Colonel! Don't cut his hand. The glass on the clock is broken."
Colonel: "I can see that, Sergeant." He examines Ferris and leaves.
Sergeant: "Sergeant!" Another sergeant enters and helps remove the wires attached to Ferris. Cut to outside chamber as a general arrives.
General: "All right, Colonel. Go!"

25:28/33:05 Finale
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Ferris is carried out on a stretcher.
Ferris: "Hey, don't go away up there. (cut to moon) Next time it won't be a dream or a nightmare. Next time it'll be for real. So don't go away. We'll be up there in a little while."
Westbrook Van Voorhis (voice over): "The barrier of loneliness. The palpable, desperate need of the human animal to be with his fellow man. Up there, up there in the vastness of space, in the void that is sky, up there is an enemy known as isolation. It sits there in the stars waiting, waiting with the patience of eons, forever waiting in the Twilight Zone."

The episode score is available on the 40th Anniversary CD set (Disc 1, Track 3) in suite form, with the cues arranged as follows:

The Film (:00-:45)
The Man (:45-1:25)
The Mirror (1:25-2:40)
The Truck (2:40-4:16)
The Breakdown (4:16-4:58)
The Bicycle (4:58-5:27)
The Book Rack (5:27-6:56)
The Lights (6:56-7:50)
The Phone Book (7:50-8:27)
The Sun (8:27-9:43)
The Button (9:43-10:28)
The Station House (10:28-11:23)

Although "Finale" isn't part of this suite, it can be heard on the same CD (Disc 1, Track 22), where it's called "Alternate End Title #3" on the jewel case and "Alternate End Title #2" in the booklet. There is doubt as to whether Herrmann wrote the cue for WIE? and then had it established as an alternate end credit theme, or vice versa.

Thanks to Paul G. for the following:

"Where Is Everybody?" is composed for the following instruments:

6 Violins
4 Horns
2 Violas
2 Celli
2 Clarinets
2 Harps
2 Basses
Flute
Oboe
English Horn
Bass Clarinet
Vibe
Last edited by Dan Hollis on 4:07 PM - Jan 05, 2016, edited 5 times in total.
Thanks to Dr. Moreau for surprising me with this signature. It beats peach brandy!

"We're sober men and true!" -- "You had to go have him!"
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cadwallader
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Joined: 8:10 PM - Oct 10, 2004

10:33 PM - Jan 05, 2008 #3

Thanks, Dan

"The Man", "Turkish Delight" and "The Door" are also longer in the pilot version than in the standard version.

The cues from "Where is Everybody" were re-used in 12 later TZ episodes, which ties it for the most with "King Nine Will Not Return" and "Back There".
Here's a list:

The Man – “The Mind and the Matter”; “On Thursday We Leave For Home”
The Door – “The Mind and the Matter”; “On Thursday We Leave For Home”; “I Am the Night-Color Me Black”
The Truck – “The Last Flight”; “The After Hours”
The Telephone – “The After Hours”; “The Howling Man”; “The Mind and the Matter”; “In His Image”; “On Thursday We Leave For Home”
The Phone Booth – “On Thursday We Leave For Home”; “I Am the Night-Color Me Black”
The Station – “The New Exhibit”; “On Thursday We Leave For Home”; “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet”; “I Am the Night-Color Me Black”
The Sun – “The After Hours”; “The Howling Man”; “On Thursday We Leave For Home”; “Nightmare at 20,000 Feet”; “I Am the Night-Color Me Black”
The Cell – “The Last Flight”; “Execution”
The Mirror – “Mr. Denton on Doomsday”; “The Last Flight”; “The After Hours”
The Book Rack - “The Last Flight”; “The Howling Man”; “On Thursday We Leave For Home”
The Lights - “The Last Flight”; “The Rip Van Winkle Caper”
The Film – none
The Bicycle – “The Last Flight”; “The Mind and the Matter”
The Breakdown – “On Thursday We Leave For Home”
The Button – “Mr. Denton on Doomsday”; “The After Hours”
Finale – none

This list only includes cues written specifically for this episode. However, "Turkish Delight" can also be heard in "Execution", and Howard Duff whistles "Comin' Thru the Rye" in "A World of Difference"

There is also some question about the actual titles; The cue sheet lists "The Phone Booth", "The Station House", and "The Book Rack", while some cue sheets for later episodes list the same cues as "The Phone Book", "The Station" or "The Stationhouse", and "The Bookrack". The original score is apparently lost so we may never know what Herrmann's actual titles were.
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Dan Hollis
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Dan Hollis
Zone Legend
Joined: 3:03 AM - Sep 28, 2004

11:57 PM - Jan 07, 2008 #4

Musical cues for "One for the Angels"
(using starting time stamps from Image Entertainment pre-Definitive Edition)

Score assembled from stock library

Episode starts at :00

:42 Middletown (Average Size City Music)
Willis Schaefer
Pan down to miniature version of Robby the Robot, grabbed by the hand of sidewalk pitchman Lew Bookman.
Lew: "Right here, ladies and gentlemen. Special July cleanup sale. Lovely things. Calamine lotion, good for sunburns and dysentery. How about binoculars?" As he delivers his pitch, a man in a black suit stands behind him, taking notes.
Rod: "Street scene: summer, the present. Man on a sidewalk named Lew Bookman, age sixtyish. Occupation: pitchman. Lew Bookman, a fixture of the summer, a rather minor component to a hot July. (begin slow zoom into note taker) A nondescript, commonplace little man whose life is a treadmill built out of sidewalks. But in just a moment, Lew Bookman will have to concern himself with survival. Because as of three o'clock this hot July afternoon, he'll be stalked by --"
Note: The parenthetical "Average Size City Music" is written that way on its score. The composer signed his named "Willie Schafer" here, and it appears that way on the cue sheet, but for consistency I plan to use one version of any composer's name throughout the series.

1:46 Fade-In
Bernard Herrmann, from The House on K-Street
The note taker, just identified by Rod as Mr. Death, quickly looks into the camera. Lead into commercial.
Note: The House on K-Street was an unsold 1959 pilot for a proposed TV series, with a score composed by Herrmann. The pilot itself faded into oblivion long ago, but it lives forever in TZ lore as the source of the ominous "Mr. Death Chord."

1:53 Middletown (Average Size City Music)
Willis Schaefer
Coming out of commercial, Lew packs up his case and leaves. Dissolve to him walking with neighborhood children.
Lew: "Heh, heh, heh!"
Several Children: "Hi, Lew!"
Lew: "Hello, darling. Oh, here, here, have some candy --"

2:47 Improvised Humming
Ed Wynn
Dissolve to Lew as he enters his apartment. Humming all the time, he hangs up his hat, puts down his case, and waters some plants. Zoom into him as he suddenly stops.

3:15 Fade-In
Bernard Herrmann, from The House on K-Street
Cut to Death sitting in a chair.
Lew: "Hey, you ... you're the man I saw on the sidewalk today. You ... you were writing in a book."

3:21 Rain Clouds
Bernard Herrmann, from "Western Suite" (Part 10)
Death: "You are Lew Bookman, aren't you?"
Lew: "That's right, Lewis J. Bookman. Is there something I can show you? Maybe something in collar stays? I'll get them."
Death: "No, no, Mr. Bookman. I'm not here to buy anything."
Lew: "Oh."
Death: "Now let's get to business, shall we? Lewis J. Bookman, age sixty-nine, right?"
Lew: "I'll be seventy in September."
Death: "Occupation: pitchman. Right?"
Lew: "Yeah, that's right. Are you a census taker?"
Death: "Born: New York City, 1890."
Lew: "That's right, 1890."
Death: "Father: Jacob Bookman. Mother: Flora Bookman. Father's place of birth: Detroit, Michigan. Mother's place of birth: Syracuse, New York. Right?"
Lew: "That's right. My goodness, you ... you got it all down in that book there."
Death: "Yes, we have to keep these things efficient. Now today is the nineteenth of July, and your departure is at midnight tonight."
Lew: "My departure? (knock at the door) Oh, excuse me. (answers the door) Hi, Maggie!"

4:57 Piano Sweetener
Unknown
Lew (pointing): "That gentleman." Cut to empty chair.
Maggie: "What gentleman?"
Death (off camera): "Mr. Bookman --"

5:42 Night Suspense
Bernard Herrmann, from "Western Suite" (Part 1)
Lew closes the door behind Maggie and thinks.
Lew: "Hmm. I can see you, yet she can't."
Death: "Only those who are to accompany me can see me. Understand, Mr. Bookman? Mr. Bookman? Only those who are to accompany me can see me. Now don't you think you'd better start making your arrangements?"
Lew: "Arrangements for what?"
Death: "For your departure."
Lew: "My departure where?"
Death: "You still don't get it. I just never will understand you people. You get the idiotic notion that life goes on forever, and of course it doesn't. Everyone has to go sometime."
Lew: "Go? You mean --"
Death: "That's right. And what I further don't understand is how little you appreciate the nature of your departure. Think of all the poor souls who go in violent accidents. These are the nonprecognition victims. We're not permitted to forewarn them. You, Mr. Bookman, fall into the category of natural causes."
Lew: "Natural causes? Number one, I find you a very devious sort. Number two, I think that you're dishonest. Number three, why don't you say what you mean?"
Death: "Mr. Bookman, I've done everything but phone your own undertaker. How much clearer do you want it? If you still don't know who I am, then you're the most dense man I've come up against." After thinking a few seconds, he touches a flower.

7:08 Fade-In
Bernard Herrmann, from The House on K-Street
The flower wilts and dies.
Lew: "You're ... you're Death?"
Death: "Exactly --"

8:55 Prelude
Bernard Herrmann, from "Outer Space Suite" (Part 1)
Lew: "... That's it, you see, I -- yes. Yes, I ... I have some unfinished business. Unfinished business, yes. (thinks, then spots toy helicopter) I've never flown in a helicopter. That's it. I've never flown in --"
Death (off camera): "Insufficient, Mr. Bookman. Anything else?" Lew looks for Death but has to turn around to see him.
Lew: "Now you look here. I've lived in this room --"

10:46 Prelude
Bernard Herrmann, from "Outer Space Suite" (Part 1)
Lew: "That's right. One for the angels."
Death: "I'm terribly sorry, Mr. Bookman, but no. Well, you see, these ... these categories are fairly specific, and when reference is made to unfinished business of a major nature, well, the only interpretation to be made here is simply that -- Well, what I mean is that, uh, unfortunately, Mr. Bookman, an ability to ... to succeed in a given professional venture is really hardly of a major -- (sees how depressed Lew is) Mean a great deal to you, does it?"
Lew: "A great deal." Death thinks hard.
Death: "All right, Mr. Bookman. Under the circumstances I believe I can grant you a delay."
Lew: "Until?"
Death: "What do you mean, until? Until you've made this ... this pitch you're talking about."
Lew: "I can live till then?"
Death: "That's the agreement."
Lew: "Oh, well, I think that's a fine bargain. --"

12:29 Spoutnik #2
Guy Luypaertz
Death: "Really, Mr. Bookman. This is much more serious than you imagine. (Lew grabs his hat and leaves, but Death is waiting for him by the staircase) It's much more complex than you realize what you've just done. (Lew trots downstairs, only to see that Death has beaten him there) Here I've gone out of my way to help you, and this is the way you repay me. (Lew goes all the way down to front door, but Death is already there) Mr. Bookman --"

14:41 Fade-In
Bernard Herrmann, from The House on K-Street
A dark shadow is cast over Maggie.
Maggie: "Lew?"
Lew: "Yes?"
Maggie: "Lew, who's that man?" Lew looks back.

14:49 Rain Clouds
Bernard Herrmann, from "Western Suite" (Part 10)
Cut to Death taking notes.
Lew: "Do you see him?"
Maggie: "Yes, Lew." Lew goes over to Death.
Lew: "Hey, wait a minute. You can't take her. No, sirree. You can't take her. (follows Death, who completely ignores him) Now listen, I'll go. Never mind the pitch. I don't even want to wait. I'll go right now. You can't take her. I'll go with you and --" He gives up.

15:21 Bad Man
Bernard Herrmann, from "Western Suite" (Part 2)
Lew looks around in disgust. Lead into commercial.

15:35 Rain Clouds
Bernard Herrmann, from "Western Suite" (Part 10)
Come out of commercial to Maggie lying in bed. Dissolve to doctor by bedroom window as he turns out the light and leaves as a group of neighbors surround him.
Neighbors: "Doc? Hey, Doc? How's Maggie? --"
Doctor: "I can't make out. I can't tell." He leaves the apartment building and meets Lew sitting on the steps.
Lew: "Doctor?"
Doctor: "It's hard to tell. She's a very sick little girl, but we'll know soon. She should hit a crisis by midnight."
Lew: "By midnight?"
Doctor: "I think by then." He leaves.

16:16 Prelude
Bernard Herrmann, from "Outer Space Suite" (Part 1)
Dissolve to Maggie's alarm clock reading 11:40, with a toy spaceman next to it. Pan over to Maggie lying in bed. Dissolve to Lew anxiously waiting on the steps.

16:35 Fade-In
Bernard Herrmann, from The House on K-Street
A dark shadow is cast over Lew. He turns around to see Death coming down the sidewalk.
Death: "Good evening, Mr. Bookman."
Lew: "You've got business in there?"
Death: "I most certainly do. --"

16:46 Rain Clouds
Bernard Herrmann, from "Western Suite" (Part 10)
Death: "... It's quarter to twelve. In fifteen minutes, midnight. That's my appointment." He sits next to Lew.
Lew: "Mr. Death, that ... that little girl's only eight years old. I'm ready now."
Death: "I'm sorry, Mr. Bookman, but I had to make other arrangements. It's impossible to change them now. She's to come with me at midnight --"

18:19 Time Suspense
Bernard Herrmann, from "Outer Space Suite" (Part 6)
Lew (holding necktie): "... if you will feast your eyes on probably the most exciting invention since atomic energy a simulated silk, so fabulously conceived as to mystify even the ancient Chinese silk manufacturers. An almost unbelievable attention to detail. A piquant interweaving of gossamer softness. (superimposed closeups of Maggie, Lew, and Death) Witness, if you will, a demonstration of tensile strength. (unravels spool of thread) Feel that if you will, sir. Unbelievable, isn't it? As strong as steel, yet as fragile and delicate as Shantung silk. (clock reads 11:49) Picture, if you will, three hundred years of backbreaking research and labor to develop this: the absolute ultimate in thread. And what would you expect to pay for this fabulous, I say fabulous, incredible amazing development of the tailor's art? Would you pay thirty dollars a spool? Twenty-five? Twenty? Ten? Or -- (Death nods) Well, very well you might, sir, if you were trying to purchase this in stores. But this fantastic thread is not available in stores. It is smuggled in by Oriental birds especially trained for ocean travel, each carrying a minute quantity in a small satchel underneath their ruby throats. It takes eight hundred and thirty-two crossings to supply enough thread to go around one spool. And tonight, at my special get-acquainted introductory mid-July hot summer sale, I offer you this fabulous thread, not at twenty dollars a spool, not at ten, not at five, but at the ridiculously low price of twenty-five cents a spool!"
Death: "I'll take all you have!" He reaches into his pocket. Dissolve to Maggie. Pan over to clock reading 11:55.
Lew: "Sewing needles! Yarn! Odd lots of leather! Marvellous plastic shoelaces! Genuine static eradicators -- will fit any standard radio! Suntan oil! Eczema powder! Razors! Athlete's feet destroyer! How about some nice simulated cashmere socks?"
Death: "All right, all right, all right, I'll take it all. All of it. (holds out bag) Right here." Dissolve to clock reading 11:58.
Lew: "And now for the piece de resistance. An item never before offered in this or any other country. One guaranteed live human manservant."
Death: "How's that?"
Lew: "For what I ask, you shall receive a willing, capable, worldly, highly sophisticated, wonderfully loyal right-hand man to use in any capacity you see fit."
Death: "How's that?"
Lew: "Me! Lewis J. Bookman, the first model of his kind. He comes to you with an absolute guarantee. All parts interchangeable, with a certificate of four years serviceability. He eats little. He sleeps little. He rests only occasionally. And there he is at your elbow, at your beck and call whenever needed."
Death: "Mr. Bookman, you are a persuasive man."
Lew: "I challenge any other store, wholesale house, or industry to even come close to matching what I offer you here. Because my dear man, I offer you, I offer you --" A clock starts to chime midnight in the distance. Cut to alarm clock reading 12:00 as toy spaceman starts moving. Cut to Maggie, who starts to awaken.

22:54 Starlight
Bernard Herrmann, from "Outer Space Suite" (Part 7)
Lew: "... Well, I ... I guess it's time for me now."
Death: "As per our agreement."
Lew: "Well, I'm ready."
Death: "After you, Mr. Bookman." They start to leave.
Lew: "Oh, excuse me. I forgot something. I'll be back in a minute. (gets his case) You never know who might need something up there. (hopefully points upward) Up there?"
Death: "Up there, Mr. Bookman. You made it." Lew smiles and heads down the sidewalk with Death. Rod does his outro. Dissolve from street lamp (minus Hermy Brandt) to stars.

24:03 Police Force Opening
Bernard Herrmann, from "Police Force Suite" (Part 1)
24:03 The Ambush
Bernard Herrmann, from "Western Suite" (Part 3)
Final sting.
Note: These two cues are concurrent.
Note from Bill Wrobel: "It is unknown why this title (Police Force) was given. Two logical assumptions: (1) The cues were meant for a proposed new series (but never produced); (2) more likely, the cues were written as 'mood music' based on the police/detective theme."

Note: "Outer Space Suite" was composed by Bernard Herrmann for stock use and appears on the 40th Anniversary CD set (Disc 1, Tracks 5-15):
Part 1: Prelude (Track 5)
Part 2: Time Passage (omitted; can be heard in "Third from the Sun")
Part 3: Signals (Track 6)
Part 4: Space Drift (Track 7)
Part 5: Space Stations (Track 8)
Part 6: Time Suspense (Track 9)
Part 7: Starlight (Track 10)
Part 8: Danger (Track 11)
Part 9: Moonscape (Track 12)
Part 10: The Airlock (Track 13)
Part 11: Tycho (Track 14)
Part 12: The Earth (Track 15)

All of these cues except "The Earth" are used at least once each on TZ.
Last edited by Dan Hollis on 2:28 AM - Mar 17, 2015, edited 2 times in total.
Thanks to Dr. Moreau for surprising me with this signature. It beats peach brandy!

"We're sober men and true!" -- "You had to go have him!"
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12:47 AM - Jan 08, 2008 #5

Doing only one a week, I feel I have the time and ambition to make these lists a little more informative. So for each cue I'm going to give a brief description of what's happening in the episode. I've just added descriptions for "Where Is Everybody?" and "One for the Angels," and I plan to include similar descriptions as I add episodes.
Thanks to Dr. Moreau for surprising me with this signature. It beats peach brandy!

"We're sober men and true!" -- "You had to go have him!"
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5:38 PM - Jan 14, 2008 #6

Musical cues for "Mr. Denton on Doomsday"
(using starting time stamps from Image Entertainment pre-Definitive Edition, preceded in blue with time stamps calculated to begin at :00)

Score assembled from stock library

Episode starts at :00/:11

:31/:42 Stenka Razin (See Note 1)
Dmitri Sadovnikov (lyrics; composer is in doubt)
Pan down to Old West setting as Bob McCord drives a wagon into town with electrical power lines anachronistically visible in the distance. A drunken Al Denton tumbles out of the saloon. Peddler Henry J. Fate watches. Dan Hotaling comes out of the saloon and motions to others to join him.

1:30/1:41 How Dry I Am
Unknown
Hotaling gives a three-note sample of what he wants Denton to sing.
Hotaling: "How dry I --"

1:51/2:02 How Dry I Am
Unknown
Denton (singing): "How dry I am,
How dry I am --"
Liz: "Charlie, can't you break that up?"
Denton (singing): "... Nobody knows --"
Charlie: "I don't like it any more than you do, the misery they give that guy out there."
Denton (singing): "How dry I am!
How dry I am,
Nobody cares
How dry I am!"

2:48/2:59 Stenka Razin (See Note 1)
Dmitri Sadovnikov (lyrics; composer is in doubt)
Rod does his intro.

3:32/3:43 Chime Note
Unknown
A gun materializes next to Denton's hand.
Note: "Stenka Razin" continues through this cue and beyond.

3:40/3:51 Zither Diminished Chords
Unknown
Lead into commercial.
Note: "Stenka Razin" continues through the end of this cue.

3:45/3:56 Stenka Razin (See Note 1)
Dmitri Sadovnikov (lyrics; composer is in doubt)
Coming out of commercial, Denton picks up broken bottle and is almost run over.

4:12/4:23 Zither Diminished Chords
Unknown
Denton examines gun he just picked up. Fate watches him with a smile.

6:26/6:37 How Dry I Am
Unknown
Denton (singing): "How dry I am (Liz sadly closes her eyes while Hotaling smiles wickedly),
How dry I am,
Nobody knows
How dry I --"

9:41/9:52 Reflection #4
Lucien Moraweck
Everyone stares at each other in shock after Denton's second miracle shot except for Fate, who smiles from outside and walks away.
Man: "Mr. Denton, maybe you'd let us buy you a drink."
Denton: "What'd you call me?"
Man: "I ... I didn't mean no offense."
Denton: "I just asked you what you called me."
Man: "Nothin'. Nothin, Mr. Denton. I didn't call you anything."
Denton: "That's what you called me. 'Mister' Denton. He called me 'Mister,' Charlie."
Charlie: "Here you are, Al." He pours a drink for Denton.

11:00/11:11 Stenka Razin (See Note 1)
Dmitri Sadovnikov (lyrics; composer is in doubt)
Denton leaves the saloon. Liz follows.
Liz: "Al! I think everything's gonna be all right now, understand? Charlie says you're as good with a gun now as you ever were."
Denton: "That's what Charlie says, huh? I was good. I was real good. I was so good that once a day someone would ride into town to make me prove it. And every morning I'd start my drinkin' a few minutes earlier, until one morning the guy who asked me to prove it turned out to be sixteen years old. I left him there on his face, right there in front of the saloon. I left him there bleedin' to death with my bullet in him. I guess it'll start all over again now. Every fast and fancy man who owns a gun will come ridin' in down that street. Only this time it'll be me face down, bleedin' to death. I think I'll go in and get a shave. I want to look proper on the day I die." He walks into a barbershop.

12:40/12:51 Zither Diminished Chords
Unknown
Fate's reflection is seen in barbershop window. Zoom into Fate. Lead into commercial.
Note: There is a slight overlap with "Stenka Razin."

12:49/13:00 Night in the Desert (See Note 2)
Dimitri Tiomkin, arranged by René Garriguenc
Coming out of commercial, Denton feels his shaven face. Two men arrive and enter.
Messenger: "Tall man. --"

13:11/13:22 Albany
Bernard Herrmann, from The Ethan Allen Story
Messenger: "... Doesn't usually wear his gun. Blonde hair."
Denton: "Who does that describe?"
Messenger: "Describes a man named Al Denton. Supposed to be top gun here. Would that be you?"
Denton: "That'd be me."
Messenger: "I got a message for you, Denton. Comes from Pete Grant."
Denton: "Well, let's hear the message."
Messenger: "Pete'll be in town tomorrow night at ten. He'll meet you over in the saloon."
Denton: "Look, you tell him ... you tell him there's no call -- (after a long pause) Tell Mr. Grant I'll be there tomorrow night. I'll wait for his pleasure."
Messenger: "That's just what it'll be." They leave. Denton puts on his hat and reaches for his gun.
Denton: "Didn't take any time at all. Just time enough for one shave." Fade to black.
Note: The Ethan Allen Story was an unsold 1956 pilot for a proposed TV series, with a score composed by Herrmann. If I interpret IMDb correctly, it was televised on May 15, 1957, as part of the series Hawkeye and the Last of the Mohicans.

14:36/14:47 Night in the Desert (See Note 2)
Dimitri Tiomkin, arranged by René Garriguenc
Fade into Denton as he practices shooting at a can but is unable to hit it.

14:54/15:05 The Button
Bernard Herrmann, from TZ episode "Where Is Everybody?"
Dissolve to Denton packing. Hearing noise outside, he look out the window and sees Fate down below.

15:28/15:39 The Mirror
Bernard Herrmann, from TZ episode "Where Is Everybody?"
Denton heads to his door and goes down to meet Fate.
Fate: "Evenin', Mr. Denton."
Denton: "I can't use anything."
Fate: "How's that?"

17:14/17:25 Reflection #4
Lucien Moraweck
Denton takes the potion bottle.
Fate: "I call that my fast gun developer. Man who drinks that becomes the fastest of the fast. He'll be able to shoot a hole through a silver dollar in mid-air at a hundred feet or better without even aiming. It's guaranteed to last for ten seconds."
Denton: "Ten seconds? And after that?"
Fate: "Well, after that the user's on his own. Here. Try it. Well, test the merchandise, so to speak. Go ahead. Proof of the pudding. Go ahead. (sternly) Drink it!" Denton lifts bottle to his mouth.

18:59/19:10 Zither Diminished Chords
Unknown
Fate climbs into his wagon. Denton stares at the bottle. Dissolve to clock reading 9:58.

19:37/19:48 Albany
Bernard Herrmann, from The Ethan Allen Story
19:37/19:48 Tympani Beat
Unknown
Grant and his cronies ride into town.
Charlie: "That'd be Grant." Closeups of Denton, Fate, and Liz as they await Grant.
Note: These two cues are concurrent.

20:15/20:26 Fear #2
Lucien Moraweck
Grant reaches the saloon doors and enters.
Grant: "You Denton?"
Denton: "That's right."
Grant: "I hear you're supposed to be fast."
Denton: "You got a good chance to find out."
Grant: "I aim to. Step away from the bar please, Mr. Denton (patron moves out of the way) and draw."
Note: "Albany" and "Tympani Beat" continue through this cue and into the next one.

21:06/21:17 Night in the Desert (See Note 2)
Dimitri Tiomkin, arranged by René Garriguenc
Denton drinks his potion, turns around, and sees that Grant is drinking from an identical bottle. They stare at each other in amazement.
Note: "Albany" and "Tympani Beat" continue for about seven seconds through this cue.

22:51/23:02 Stenka Razin (See Note 1)
Dmitri Sadovnikov (lyrics; composer is in doubt)
Grant and his cronies depart, followed by Fate, who exchanges knowing smiles with Denton. Rod does his outro.

Note 1: Although the cue title is only "Russian Folk Song #1," Cadwallader provided the actual name for it: "Stenka Razin" ("Стенька Разин"). Wikipedia gives more information about it here, including the name of the lyricist.

Note 2: The composer of "Night in the Desert" is in question. The cue sheet gives Tiomkin and Garriguenc the first two times but only Garriguenc the third. Meanwhile, an analysis by Bill Wrobel lists only Tiomkin. Cadwallader believes that Tiomkin is the composer and Garriguenc the arranger, which makes enough sense for me to list them as such.
Last edited by Dan Hollis on 4:31 AM - Feb 08, 2014, edited 1 time in total.
Thanks to Dr. Moreau for surprising me with this signature. It beats peach brandy!

"We're sober men and true!" -- "You had to go have him!"
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5:51 AM - Jan 21, 2008 #7

Musical cues for "The Sixteen-Millimeter Shrine"
(using starting time stamps from Image Entertainment pre-Definitive Edition, preceded in blue with time stamps calculated to begin at :00)

Original score composed and conducted by FRANZ WAXMAN

Note: Although Waxman receives sole composition credit on screen, several cues were arranged by Leon Raab and are indicated here as such.

Note: The cue sheet says only "Sixteen Millimeter Suite" besides the Herrmann framing music. Individual cue names come courtesy of Cadwallader's research.

Episode starts at :00/:12

:40/:52 Prologue
Franz Waxman, arranged by Leon Raab, from the episode score
Pan down to vintage motion picture (probably A Night in Paris) starring Barbara Jean Trenton and Jerry Hearndan. A musical soundtrack provides background.
Jerry: "Oh, my darling!"
Barbara: "Tell me. Now you are going, and I shall have a memory of you for my eyes, thoughts of you for my mind, and a touch of you for all of me. I'll never forget you." She kisses him. Cut to older version of Barbara sitting next to a projector in a darkened room, where she watches herself from years ago. Rod does his intro. Lead into commercial.

2:00/2:12 Alone
Franz Waxman, from the episode score
Soundtrack of movie that's running when Sally enters projection room with tray.
Sally: "Miss Trenton? (cut to empty chair) Miss Trenton!" Cut to younger Barbara on screen.

2:17/2:29 Twilight Shimmer
Franz Waxman, from the episode score
Older Barbara emerges from behind screen.
Barbara: "What is it, Sally?" Sally shudders.
Sally: "I ... I brought you ... I brought you a snack, Miss Trenton."
Barbara: "Thank you. Just put it down there."
Sally: "Yes, ma'am." She puts down the tray and leaves.
Note: "Alone" continues through the end of this cue.

3:30/3:42 The End
Franz Waxman, arranged by Leon Raab, from the episode score
Soundtrack of movie that's winding up when Danny Weiss enters projection room and sees "THE END" on screen.

6:16/6:28 This Is 1959
Franz Waxman, arranged by Leon Raab, from the episode score
Barbara: "Go to the Devil!"
Danny: "Now, Barbara, honey. This is 1959. It's twenty-five years from A Night in Paris and twenty-six years since you made Farewell Without Tears. That room across the hall is dark, it's damp, it's full of cobwebs. Now come on, snap out of it. Snap out of this kick. You get your war paint on, and I'll meet you over at Sall's office at three o'clock, OK?"
Barbara: "OK, Danny." Danny kisses her cheek and starts to leave. Begin dissolve to Marty Sall in his office.
Note: The cue as composed includes a fanfare at the end which is not heard in the episode but is part of the 40th Anniversary suite. Paul Giammarco created this video of how "This Is 1959" would sound had the full version been included in the episode.

9:13/9:25 The Producer
Franz Waxman, arranged by Leon Raab, from the episode score
Barbara walks out of Sall's office.
Danny: "Sall, remind me someday when you've gone over the hill and you're down on your hands and knees, remind me to give you a swift kick in the teeth so that you know exactly how it feels!" He leaves. Dissolve to Barbara returning home with Danny.
Danny: "Barbie?"
Barbara: "What?"
Danny: "You were right about him. He's a petty little man. Mean temper and a dirty mouth. You shouldn't pay any attention to him."

10:46/10:58 The Past
Franz Waxman, arranged by Leon Raab, from the episode score
Barbara: "... right now, Danny, these are the 1930s again, with all the charm and romance, all the gaiety. That was a carefree world, Danny, and I'm gonna make it that way again."
Danny: "You can't! It's nostalgic, it's nice, but it's not true. It's phony!"
Barbara: "It doesn't have to be phony. If I wish hard enough, it doesn't have to be phony. Darling, we'll give a party. We'll invite all my friends. You tell 'em I'm still here, or what it's like here. Tell Jerry Hearndan, Steve Black, Paul Nader. Tell them, Danny!"
Danny: "Barbara, this is ridiculous! Have you forgotten? Paul Nader's been dead for five years. Jerry Hearndan lives in Chicago. Steve Black hasn't been around for fifteen years. And if I could get them, what kind of a party do you think I'd invite them here? Don't you understand what you're doing? You've built yourself a graveyard here. You keep wishing for things that are dead!" He leaves. Troubled, Barbara locks the door behind him. Lead into commercial.

12:10/12:22 The Penthouse
Franz Waxman, arranged by Leon Raab, from the episode score
Coming out of commercial, soundtrack of movie Barbara is happily watching with herself and Jerry on a penthouse roof.
Younger Barbara (off camera): "I shan't tell a soul."
Jerry: "All for you, with love from me." He kisses Barbara's hand, then slowly backs up and leaves. Barbara tousles her hair. The older Barbara does likewise and laughs from her chair.

13:24/13:36 The Penthouse (Continued)
Franz Waxman, arranged by Leon Raab, from the episode score
Cut back to movie and its soundtrack, where Jerry is sipping champagne. Danny knocks on door.
Danny (off camera): "Barbara, it's me, Danny. Can I come in, please?"
Barbara: "Danny, please go away!"
Danny (off camera): "Oh, Barbara, please. I've got something important to tell you." She turns off the projector.
Note: This is a separate cue from "The Penthouse." The parenthetical "Continued" is part of the title.

14:23/14:35 A Visitor
Franz Waxman, from the episode score
Barbara: "Jerry? Jerry? (opens door) Where is he?"
Danny: "Well, he's in town on business. I happened to meet him at the hotel. He asked about you, asked if he could come to see you, and I took the liberty."
Barbara: "Oh, I must look awful. Oh, darling, when he gets here take him into the study. I ... I've got to do my face, change --"
Danny: "He'd love you if you came down in sackcloths, but go ahead."
Barbara: "I'll hurry!" She leaves as Danny happily watches. Dissolve to Barbara, now elegantly dressed, as she enters. Her smile suddenly turns to a horrified expression. Cut to closeup of Jerry as he looks now.

17:03/17:15 Back to the Past
Franz Waxman, from the episode score
Barbara slowly walks back into the projection room, shuts the door behind herself, sits, and turns on the projector.

17:44/17:56 Champagne
Franz Waxman, arranged by Leon Raab, from the episode score
Soundtrack of movie in which Barbara watches herself and Jerry drink champagne.
Barbara: "There you are, Jerry. There you are. You look so young. So wonderfully young. Who's the strange old man here a while ago who said he was you? Jerry, I wish I could be there with you. I wish I could be up there with you. --"

18:33/18:45 Twilight Shimmer
Franz Waxman, from the episode score
Barbara: "... I wish. Oh, how I wish. I wish --" The camera goes out of focus.
Note: "Champagne" continues through the end of this cue.

20:36/20:48 Shrine [Part 1]
Franz Waxman, arranged by Leon Raab, from the episode score
Danny turns on the projector. He and Sally watch Barbara in movie welcome the actors of her past into her house.
Barbara: "Darlings, it's so good to see you. We're all having dinner by the pool. Please, everyone outside. Steve, Paul, Jerry."
Danny: "Barbie! Please come back, Barbara! (on film, she reacts to his call) Barbie, it's me, Danny! (she smiles, blows him a kiss, and tosses her scarf) Barbie, come back! Please, Barbie! Barbie! Come back, Barbie!" The film runs out.

22:40/22:52 Shrine [Part 2]
Franz Waxman, arranged by Leon Raab, from the episode score
Danny turns off projector, walks out of room, and picks up Barbara's scarf. He sniffs it, thinks a while, and smiles.
Danny: "To wishes, Barbie. To the ones that come true." Dissolve to painting of younger Barbara. Rod does his outro.
Note: "Part 1" and "Part 2" are my own designations of two sections of the same cue that are separated by a 29-second gap in the episode that occurs right after the film of Barbara's party runs out. The two parts are one continuous cue on CD, for which I've indicated the timings of the corresponding two episode parts. The cue title is in question, as explained by Cadwallader:

It's possible that "Shrine" isn't the title of the cue as Waxman intended. Sometimes composers include the title, or part of the title, of the episode in the cue title. For example, the title of the first cue from "Perchance to Dream" reads "Prelude (P. to Dream)"; the first cue from "Time Enough at Last" is "T. Z. Opening - Time." In most cases I assume this is to differentiate between cues that would otherwise have the same title, as many episodes have "Prologue" or "Prelude" as their first cue.

In "The Sixteen-Millimeter Shrine," this occurs with the cue "A Visitor." On the score it says "A Visitor - Shrine," and the "Shrine" part looks like it might be in a different handwriting. Which brings me back to the "Shrine" cue. This one just says in the title line, "Twilight Zone - (Shrine)," and again the "Shrine" part seems to have been written by someone else. Which is a little strange because in addition to the "title" line there is a "prod." line on which is written the title of the episode, and this is on the first page of every single cue, so the added "Shrine" seems unnecessary. The point is, the only title Waxman seems to have given the "Shrine" cue is "Twilight Zone." However, in the production logs there is a listing of every cue that was used that year, and for this cue number (2092) it lists "Shrine" as the title, so I'll stick with it as an official title.


The episode score is available on the 40th Anniversary CD set (Disc 4, Track 8) in suite form, with the cues arranged as follows:

Alone (:00-:28)
The Penthouse (:28-1:14)
Prologue (1:14-2:16)
The Producer (2:16-2:43)
The Past (2:43-4:06)
Champagne (4:06-5:36)
This is 1959 (5:36-6:15)
A Visitor (6:15-6:50)
Back to the Past (6:50-7:30)
Shrine [Part 1] (7:30-9:07)
Shrine [Part 2] (9:07-10:34)
The End (10:34-10:50)

"The Producer" was reused in "He's Alive." There is no other cue reused in any other TZ episode.
Last edited by Dan Hollis on 2:45 AM - Dec 01, 2013, edited 4 times in total.
Thanks to Dr. Moreau for surprising me with this signature. It beats peach brandy!

"We're sober men and true!" -- "You had to go have him!"
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3:08 PM - Jan 27, 2008 #8

Musical cues for "Walking Distance"
(using starting time stamps from Image Entertainment pre-Definitive Edition, preceded in blue with time stamps calculated to begin at :00)

Original score composed and conducted by BERNARD HERRMANN

Episode starts at :00/:10

1:23/1:33 Introduction
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Martin Sloan sits in his convertible and grooms himself as Rod introduces us to him. Lead into commercial.

2:40/2:50 The Drugstore
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Martin walks from the service station toward Homewood as viewed in the cigarette machine mirror. Dissolve to Martin entering drugstore, again as viewed in mirror. Charlie, the counterman, addresses him.
Charlie: "Yeah, what'll it be?"
Martin: "Uh, I don't suppose you still make those great chocolate sodas, do you? Three scoops?"
Charlie: "How's that?"
Martin: "Well, I spent half my life in this drugstore. Grew up here. One thing I always remember ordering was a chocolate soda with three scoops. --"

4:27/4:37 Memories
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Martin enjoys a spoonful of ice cream.
Martin: "Umm, that's a good soda."
Charlie: "Tastes OK?"
Martin: "Umm, wonderful. You know, it's funny how many memories you connect with a place. I always thought if I ever came back here everything would be all changed. No, nothing recognizable. Instead, it's just as if I'd left yesterday. Just as if I'd been away overnight. I almost expect Mr. Wilson to be in the stockroom sleeping just like he always did before he died. That's one of the memories I have. Old Man Wilson, may God rest his soul, sleeping in his big comfortable chair in the other room. Well, here you are. Thanks a lot." He hands a dollar bill to Charlie.
Charlie: "That's a buck!"
Martin: "Yeah, it was worth it. Well, so long." He leaves. Charlie walks upstairs, knocks on a door, and enters, where Mr. Wilson is sleeping in a chair.
Charlie (clearing throat): "Mr. Wilson?"
Wilson: "Yep, Charlie?"
Charlie: "We're going to need some more chocolate syrup, Mr. Wilson."
Wilson: "I'll order some more of it this afternoon." He winks and nods. Dissolve to Martin happily strolling along a sidewalk.
Martin: "Wilcox, Dr. Bradbury ... Van Buren, Rooney."
Boy (starting off camera): "Hi! (cut to boy with marbles in the street behind him) Hi!"
Martin: "Hi! You pretty good?"
Boy: "At aggies? Not bad."

7:58/8:08 The Park
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Dissolve to Martin happily strolling through park.
Woman (starting off camera): "Bobby, you get down from there! Bobby! Bobby, listen to me! (finish pan over to woman) Bobby? Bobby, mind me! Bobby, will you come down from that tree?"
Martin: "Come on, Bobby!"
Woman: "Bobby, Bobby, listen to me! Bobby!"
Martin: "Come on, get down!"
Woman: "Bobby!"
Martin: "Come on!"
Woman: "Bobby!"
Martin: "That's a boy! Come on, right here!"
Woman: "Bobby, what am I ever gonna do with you?"
Martin: "Ah, it's so wonderful, isn't it?"
Woman: "The park? Certainly is. All right, Bobby."
Martin: "That's part of summer, too. The music and the merry-go-round, the calliope."
Woman: "And the cotton candy. The ice cream. The band concerts."
Martin: "Nothing quite as good ever. Nothing quite as good as summer, and being a kid."
Woman: "Are you from around here?"
Martin: "No. Well, what I mean is I used to be a long time ago. Lived a couple of blocks away. I played baseball on that field over there. And that merry-go-round, oh my goodness. I grew up with that merry-go-round. I carved my name on that post in the bandstand one summer. I was eleven years old, and I carved my --" He sees a younger version of himself carving in the bandstand.
Martin: "Hey. (walks over to bandstand and sees his name being carved) 'Martin Sloan.' You're Martin Sloan?"
Young Martin: "Yes, sir, but I didn't mean nothin' --"

9:48/9:58 The House
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Young Martin runs away from his older self.
Martin: "Martin? Martin! Martin!" Dissolve to adult Martin going to his old house. He rings the doorbell.
Robert (coming to door): Yes? Yes? Well, who do you want to see?"
Martin: "Pop!"
Mrs. Sloan (off camera): "Who is it, Robert?"
Martin: "Mom! Is that Mom?"
Robert: "Who are you? What do you want?"
Mrs. Sloan (joining Robert): "Who is it?"
Martin: "But you're both here. How can you be here?"
Mrs. Sloan: "What do you want, young man?"
Martin: "Mom, don't you know me? I'm Martin!"
Mrs. Sloan: "Martin? Must be a lunatic or something."
Martin: "You mustn't be frightened. I grew up here, Mom! (Robert closes door) Don't you know your own son? Mom!" Puzzled, he turns around and walks away.
Teenager (starting off camera): "Hi! (cut to teenager) You like it?" He points to his 1934 roadster.

11:55/12:05 Curtain
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Martin examines the roadster in wonderment.
Martin: "Brand new ... 1934 roadster ... right out of Detroit ... brand new ..." Lead into commercial.
Note: I assume the cue title refers to the curtain that would close on a stage at this point were this episode a live performance.

12:47/12:57 The Parents
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
At night, Martin arrives back at his old home.
Rod: "... lot of pavements between afternoon and night. (Martin picks up a baseball glove) And to a man like Martin Sloan, to whom memory has suddenly become reality, a resolve can come just as clearly and inexorably as stars in a summer night. Martin Sloan is now back in time, and his resolve is to put in a claim to the past." Martin rings a bicycle bell until Robert stops him.
Robert: "Back again, huh?"
Martin: "I had to come back, Pop. This is my house. And this is my glove. You gave it to me on my eleventh birthday, and the baseball autographed by Lou Gehrig."
Robert: "Who are you? What do you want here?"
Martin: "I don't know. I just want to rest. I'm gonna stop running. I -- (Robert grabs him) I belong here. Don't you understand that? I belong here!"
Robert: "Now look, you're probably sick. You're having delusions. I don't want to hurt you. I don't want you to get into trouble, but if you hang around here there may be trouble."
Mrs. Sloan (off camera): "Robert, who are you talking to?" She comes outside.
Martin: "Mom! Look at me. You have a son named Martin, haven't you? He goes to Emerson Public School? And the month of August he spends at his aunt's farm near Buffalo? And a couple of summers you've gone to Saratoga Lake, and rented a cottage there? Once I had a sister, but she died when she was a year old?"
Mrs. Sloan: "Where is Martin?"
Martin: "I'm Martin! You've got to believe me. I'm Martin. You've got to believe me. Look, look, here are my identification. All my cards. They'll tell you who I am. Look at them. Go on. They'll tell you. Go on. Look at them!" Mrs. Sloan slaps him.
Note: On the Definitive Edition and in syndication, Rod's narration starts sooner and ends before "The Parents" begins. The video aligns the same way with "The Parents" in all versions.

14:29/14:39 The Merry-Go-Round (pre-Definitive Edition)
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
14:29/14:39 Künstlerleben (Artist's Life) Opus 316 No. 2 (Definitive Edition and syndication)
Johann Strauss II
Martin stares at his mother and then turns around as if some realization has hit him.
Martin: "Martin. Martin, I've got to talk to you. Martin!"
Note: One of two different cues may be heard here depending on the version. If it's "Artist's Life," then Martin is hearing it in the distance, and the first twenty seconds of "The Merry-Go-Round" is eliminated.

14:49/14:59 The Merry-Go-Round
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Martin runs away from the house until he stops and stares.
Note: On pre-Definitive Edition, this is just the continuation of the previous cue. Otherwise, a truncated "The Merry-Go-Round" starts here.

15:07/15:17 Künstlerleben (Artist's Life) Opus 316 No. 2
Johann Strauss II
Cut to merry-go-round on which waltz music is played. Martin approaches it.
Martin: "(whispered) Martin. (sees his younger self riding it) Martin! Martin! (jumps onto merry-go-round) Martin! (trying to reach his younger self) Let me talk to you! Let me tell you something! I don't want to hurt you, son! Let me tell you something! I won't hurt you! I won't hurt you! I won't hurt you! Martin! Martin! Martin! Martin!"
Note: Here is how to get to a MIDI of the complete "Artist's Life." Scroll down to "Artists life Waltz" and click on the MIDI next to it.

16:14/16:24 Martin's Summer
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Young Martin falls off of the merry-go-round.
Young Martin: "Ow! My leg! My leg!" His older self also screams in pain. The merry-go-round is stopped. A woman tends to young Martin. Adult Martin slowly walks toward his younger self as the other children silently watch.
Martin: "Martin, I only wanted to tell you that this is a wonderful time of life for you. Don't let any of it go by without enjoying it. (everyone else slowly leaves) There won't be any more merry-go-rounds, no more cotton candy, no more band concerts. I only wanted to tell you that this is a wonderful time for you. Now. Here. That's all, Martin. That's all I wanted to tell you. God help me. That's all I wanted to tell you."

17:45/17:55 Elegy
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Dissolve to merry-go-round horse heads and three cuts to more of same. Robert arrives on the merry-go-round and sees Martin seated at its edge with his hand over his face.
Robert: "I thought you'd like to know the boy will be all right. Doctor says he'll limp some, but he'll be all right."
Martin: "Oh, I thank God for that."
Robert: "You dropped this at the house. I looked inside it. (hands Martin's wallet to him) It tells a great many things about you. Your driver's license, the cards, the money in it. It seems you are Martin Sloan. You're thirty-six years old, and you have an apartment in New York City. It says your driver's license expires in 1960. That's twenty-five years from now. And the dates on the bills, those dates haven't happened yet, either."
Martin: "Then you ... you know, Pop?"
Robert: "Yes, I know. I know who you are. I know you've come from a long way from here. A long way and a long time. But I don't understand how or why. Do you?"
Martin: "No."
Robert: " But you do know other things, don't you, Martin? Things that'll happen."
Martin: "Yes, I do."
Robert: "Martin?"
Martin: "Yes, Pop?"
Robert: "You have to leave here. There's no room. There's no place. Do you understand that?"
Martin: "I see that now, but I don't understand. Why not?"
Robert: "I guess because we only get one chance. Maybe there's only one summer to every customer. That little boy, the one I know, the one who belongs here, this is his summer just as it was yours once. Don't make him share it."
Martin: "All right."
Robert: "Martin, is it so bad where you're from?"
Martin: "I thought so, Pop. I've been living at a dead run and I was tired. Then one day I knew I had to come back here. I had to come back and get on the merry-go-round, and eat cotton candy, and listen to a band concert. I had to stop and breathe, and close my eyes, and smell and listen."
Robert: "I guess we all want that. Maybe when you go back, Martin, you'll find that there are merry-go-rounds and band concerts where you are. Maybe you haven't been looking in the right place. You've been looking behind you, Martin. Try looking ahead."
Martin: "Maybe."
Robert: "Goodbye, son."
Martin: "Goodbye, Pop." Robert leaves. The merry-go-round starts, and Martin jumps onto it.

21:17/21:27 Natural Rock
Bruce Campbell
Cut to closeup of jukebox. Martin enters a present-day version of the drugstore and watches teens dance to the music.

23:03/23:13 Finale
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
As Martin limps out of the drugstore and back to the service station, Rod does his outro.
Note: This is the first of several instances in which a cue title matches one previously used by the same composer in a different episode, in this case "Where Is Everybody?" Aside from cue numbers, the distinction between such cues is best made by referring to the sources, such as episode titles.

The episode score is available on the 40th Anniversary CD set (Disc 1, Track 17) in suite form, with the cues arranged as follows:

The Park (:00-1:40)
The House (1:40-3:22)
The Merry-Go-Round (3:22-4:03)
Martin's Summer (4:03-5:38)
Elegy (5:38-9:13)
Introduction (9:13-9:43)
The Parents (9:43-11:24)
Finale (11:24-12:27)
Last edited by Dan Hollis on 12:37 AM - Apr 29, 2015, edited 3 times in total.
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cadwallader
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9:46 AM - Jan 29, 2008 #9

QUOTE (Dan Hollis @ January 27, 2008 07:08 am)
12:05 The Curtain
Martin is puzzled that a teenager calls his 1934 roadster a brand new car as the cue leads into the commercial break. (Note: I assume the cue title refers to the curtain that would close on a stage at this point were this episode a live performance.)

I can verify, since I have a copy of Herrmann's original score, that the title of this cue is "Curtain" and not "The Curtain". I completely agree with Dan's assessment of the meaning of this title.
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cadwallader
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10:11 AM - Jan 29, 2008 #10

Though belated, here is a list, if anyone is interested, of the instruments for which the score for "The Sixteen-Millimeter Shrine" was written:

Flute/Piccolo
2 Clarinets
Trumpet
Horn
Trombone
Percussion: Bass Drum, Tympani, Gong, Vibraphone, Bells, Tam-tam, Snare with brushes
Piano/Organ
6 Violins
Cello
Bass
Last edited by cadwallader on 6:36 AM - Jun 04, 2013, edited 1 time in total.
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Dan Hollis
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Dan Hollis
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5:20 PM - Jan 29, 2008 #11

QUOTE (cadwallader @ January 29, 2008 04:46 am)
I can verify, since I have a copy of Herrmann's original score, that the title of this cue is "Curtain" and not "The Curtain". I completely agree with Dan's assessment of the meaning of this title.

Thanks. I was going to ask you about this anyway, since under our interpretation "Curtain" makes more sense than "The Curtain." In fact, looking back on this, I'm not sure why I added "The." I think it's because I wrote out the cue names before rewatching with them in mind and, thinking it was a literal curtain, I figured "The" would have been more consistent. I've fixed it now.
Thanks to Dr. Moreau for surprising me with this signature. It beats peach brandy!

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cadwallader
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8:34 AM - Feb 02, 2008 #12

I have some additional information re: the "Walking Distance" score.

First of all, the soundtrack on the Definitive Edition DVD is slightly different from previous releases. In this version, afer Martin is slapped by his mother, we hear "Artist's Life", rather than "The Merry-Go-Round" for about 20 seconds, then it segues into "The Merry-Go-Round". We do not get to hear “The Merry-Go-Round” in its entirety in this version.

Secondly, the original LP release of "The Twilight Zone Volume 1" on Varese Sarabande Records featured the cues in a different order. Here is the breakdown:

Intro (:00-:30)
The Parents (:30-2:13)
Finale (2:13-3:14)
The Park (3:15-4:55)
The House (4:56-6:39)
The Merry-Go-Round (6:40-7:21)
Martin’s Summer (7:21-8:55)
Elegy (8:55-12:30)

Third, here is the instrumentation for the original score, which is dated August 15, 1959:

6 1st Violins
4 2nd Violins
3 Violas
3 Celli
2 Basses
1 Harp

Finally, here are the episodes in which these cues were re-used:

Intro – “The Lateness of the Hour”; “Kick the Can”
The Drug Store – “The Lateness of the Hour”; “Kick the Can”
Memories – “Kick the Can”; “The Trade-Ins”; “Death Ship”
The Park – “The Man in the Bottle”; “The Lateness of the Hour”; “Kick the Can”; “The Incredible World of Horace Ford”
The House – “The Lateness of the Hour”; “Nothing in the Dark”
Curtain – “The Lateness of the Hour”; “Nothing in the Dark”; “No Time Like the Past”
The Parents – “The Lateness of the Hour”
The Merry-Go-Round – “Kick the Can”
Martin’s Summer – “The Lateness of the Hour”; “The Incredible World of Horace Ford”
Elegy – none
Finale – “Kick the Can”; “The Trade-Ins”
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Dan Hollis
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2:56 PM - Feb 02, 2008 #13

QUOTE (cadwallader @ February 02, 2008 03:34 am)
First of all, the soundtrack on the Definitive Edition DVD is slightly different from previous releases. In this version, afer Martin is slapped by his mother, we hear "Artist's Life", rather than "The Merry-Go-Round" for about 20 seconds, then it segues into "The Merry-Go-Round". We do not get to hear “The Merry-Go-Round” in its entirety in this version.

Thanks a lot, not only for the entire post but also for this particular tidbit. Frankly, this blows my mind. I can understand different suites, but here we have two different versions of the episode, and now I'm in doubt as to which is more authentic; i. e., which aired on CBS.

I'm betting on the pre-DE version, since that matches the cue sheet. I'm also getting more and more suspicious about how "definitive" the DE is, as I've already given reasons, mostly with regard to the opening titles, why the DE is sometimes in error.
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Dan Hollis
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3:04 PM - Feb 02, 2008 #14

I already posted the following in the "16mm Shrine" thread, but for completeness I'll put it here as well, as Cad is listing all of the other reuse of cues (thanks again):

The only instance in which the score of "The 16mm Shrine" was recycled in the series is when the cue "The Producer" is heard coming out of the third commercial (nominal midpoint) of "He's Alive."
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James B W Bevis
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3:24 PM - Feb 02, 2008 #15

A big thanks to you both!

Two versions of the "WD" score? Man, that's sick. It's beginning to seem as though nothing from Image Entertainment will ever be "definitive"...
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Paul Giammarco
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4:19 AM - Feb 04, 2008 #16

QUOTE (cadwallader @ February 02, 2008 03:34 am)
In this version, afer Martin is slapped by his mother, we hear "Artist's Life", rather than "The Merry-Go-Round" for about 20 seconds, then it segues into "The Merry-Go-Round". We do not get to hear “The Merry-Go-Round” in its entirety in this version.


Here is a link that answers this question -- Interesting sidenote: Steven Pickard, one of the posters, is the man who restored the audio on the DE DVDs.

http://herrmann.uib.no/talking/view.cgi ... topic=2154
"And I agree with you about what they call music. Why don't you play some?"
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James B W Bevis
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12:55 PM - Feb 04, 2008 #17

Thanks, Paul! (Also thanks to our member Kriegersaurus for raising the question. Nice to read Steven Pickard's comments, too, of course.)

I'm tired right now, but if I read this correctly, the "pre-Definitive" DVD has the correct version?
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Dan Hollis
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7:23 PM - Feb 04, 2008 #18

Musical cues for "Escape Clause"
(using starting time stamps from Image Entertainment pre-Definitive Edition)

Score assembled from stock library

Episode starts at :00

:00 Twilight Zone Main Title
Bernard Herrmann
Rod: "There is a fifth dimension, beyond that which is known to man. It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground between light and shadow, between science and superstition, and it lies between the pit of man's fears and the summit of his knowledge. This is the dimension of imagination. It is an area which we call the Twilight Zone. (pan down through stars, reaching exterior of apartment building) You're about to meet a hypochondriac. --" Continue pan down building.
Note: Although I don't normally include the main and end titles, this is an exception due to its overlap with Rod's episode intro and the episode score.

:46 Blues Pantomime #2
Arthur Wilkinson
Dissolve to bedridden Walter Bedeker being attended by a doctor.
Rod: "... Witness Mr. Walter Bedeker, age forty-four, afraid of the following: death, disease, other people, germs, draft, and everything else. He has one interest in life, and that's Walter Bedeker. One preoccupation: the life and well-being of Walter Bedeker. One abiding concern about society: that if Walter Bedeker should die, how will it survive without him?" Lead into commercial.
Note: There is a slight overlap with "Twilight Zone Main Title."

5:39 The Search #3
Lucien Moraweck
Bedeker looks at himself in mirror.
Bedeker: "It's a crime for a man to live such a short span of years. (gets into bed) Why can't a man live a decent number of years? Two hundred. Three hundred."
Cadwallader (voice over): "Why not five hundred? Six hundred?"

5:55 Dream Effects #1
Unknown
Bedeker: "Yes, or a thousand. Oh, what a miserable thing to contemplate. A handful of years and then an eternity (Cadwallader materializes) down under the ground in a casket in the cold, cold ground."
Cadwallader: "With worms yet."
Bedeker: "Yes, of course with worms."
Cadwallader: "I subscribe to your views wholly, Mr. Bedeker. I mean wholly."
Bedeker: "Well, that's mighty decent of you. (suddenly sits up, startled) Who are you?"
Cadwallader: "Cadwallader's my name. --"

5:59 Vibraphone
Unknown
This cue is completely overlapped by "Dream Effects #1," starting with "A handful of years" and ending as Bedeker sits up.

8:38 Anticipation
Jerry Goldsmith
Cadwallader: "A soul."
Bedeker (laughing): "You're the Devil."

8:45 Animation Comedy
Spence Moore
Cue is just the ascending clarinet line.
Cadwallader: "At your service. --"
Note: There is a slight overlap with "Anticipation."

8:47 Market Town
Arthur Wilkinson
Cue starts with descending clarinets in short dialogue gap before the following:
Cadwallader: "... How about it, Mr. Bedeker? Why not? A partnership of a sort. You deed to me your so-called soul --"
Note: There is a slight overlap with "Animation Comedy."

11:52 Punctuation D2 and D3
Arthur Wilkinson
Cadwallader produces a pen out of thin air.
Cadwallader: "You sure keep it hot in here."
Note: Cad guesses that "the ascending run is D2 and the single trumpet note is D3."

12:01 Slide #5
M. Gordon
Cadwallader raises his fist as if reaching for something.

12:03 Dream Effects #1
Unknown
Cadwallader produces a stamp out of thin air.

12:04 Wow #3
M. Gordon
Cadwallader stamps the contract, which he drops onto the floor with an evil laugh. Bedeker picks up the contract.
Note: This cue is the trombone that starts about one second later than "Dream Effects #1," which continues for about one second after "Wow #3" ends.

13:14 Market Town
Arthur Wilkinson
First three groups of notes that follow "Behold, the new Walter Bedeker," leading into ...

13:16 Comedy Tag #4
Guy Luypaertz
Single group of ascending notes that lead into commercial.

13:18 Blues Pantomime #2
Arthur Wilkinson
Coming out of commercial, Bedeker enters a subway platform.

13:24 Blues Pantomime #1
Arthur Wilkinson
A man standing next to Bedeker and wearing glasses bends to look down the track. Cut to track. Cut to closeup of Bedeker.

13:52 Too Many Ideas
Jerry Goldsmith, from Studio One episode "The Fair-Haired Boy" (Part 7)
Bedeker stands up, quite unharmed although disheveled, and is helped up onto the platform.
Bystanders: "He's alive! He's all right. What's going on here? It's a miracle. Watch your head, Mac. You all right? You OK?"
Subway Officer: "You? How-how-how'd you happen to -- how come you --"
Bedeker: "Take your hands off me, and go get your claims adjuster."
Bystanders: "He should be pulverized. There should be nothing left there." Dissolve to Bedeker back home with Ethel and a claims adjuster.

17:39 Kitten and the Bird
John Gart
Bedeker: "... I think I'll go up on the roof, and I'll jump down the light well. Straight smack dab down the light well. Fourteen stories just for the excitement of it."
Ethel: "Walter, please!" She tries to block him.
Bedeker: "Get out of my way!" He pushes her aside and heads out.
Ethel: "Walter, please!"
Bedeker: "Go drown in the tub, Ethel."
Ethel: "Walter, please!"
Bedeker: "Leave me alone!" He walks through the door.
Ethel: "Walter!" She follows him.

17:59 Too Many Ideas
Jerry Goldsmith, from Studio One episode "The Fair-Haired Boy" (Part 7)
Walter walks out onto roof with Ethel behind him.
Ethel: "Walter, please, come back to the apartment. I'll make you potato pancakes. Remember, you always used to love potato pancakes."
Bedeker: "Ethel, you are a potato pancake. You're as tasteless as a potato pancake. Now leave me alone!"
Ethel: "Walter --"

18:11 String Flareout
Unknown
Ethel: "... don't do it!" She places herself between Bedeker and the edge of the roof.
Bedeker: "Ethel, get out of my way." He inches toward the edge.
Ethel: "No, no!" She backs away from him.
Bedeker: "Get out of my way, Ethel."
Ethel (still backing up): "Please, Walter! Walter! I --" With a scream, she becomes the first in a long line of TZ characters to fall to her death. Th-th-th-th-that's all, Ethel!

18:24 Too Many Ideas
Jerry Goldsmith, from Studio One episode "The Fair-Haired Boy" (Part 7)
Bedeker lights a cigarette.
Bedeker: "I wonder what it felt like." He thinks for a few seconds, smiles, and heads downstairs. Dissolve to him in his apartment as he places a telephone call.
Bedeker: "Hello, operator, would you get me the police, please? --"

19:24 December Bride
Wilbur Hatch
Bedeker takes a puff of his cigarette. Dissolve to prison where he greets his lawyer.
Bedeker: "Well, Cooper the legal beagle. How are ya?"
Note: The cue sheet says "December Bridge," but I'm convinced this is a typo. December Bride was a CBS 1950s sitcom for which Hatch supplied some music. No further information, such as an episode title, has arisen to be more specific.

20:24 The Big Time
Jerry Goldsmith, from Studio One episode "The Fair-Haired Boy" (Part 1)
Bedeker: "Goodbye, Mr. Cooper." He stands.

20:29 The Meeting
Jerry Goldsmith, from Studio One episode "The Fair-Haired Boy" (Part 6)
Cooper (standing): "Bedeker! I don't know. I just don't understand you."
Bedeker: "Mr. Cooper, please don't bother." He leaves as a policeman unlocks the cell door for him. Begin dissolve.

20:43 Too Many Ideas
Jerry Goldsmith, from Studio One episode "The Fair-Haired Boy" (Part 7)
Finish dissolve to "SUPERIOR COURT" building. Slow zoom into its sign. Dissolve to Judge Cummings on the bench.
Cummings: "Mr. Bedeker, you've been tried --"

21:58 The Giant Killer
Jerry Goldsmith, from Studio One episode "The Fair-Haired Boy" (Part 2)
With a sickly expression, Bedeker walks over to his cot.

22:05 Too Many Ideas
Jerry Goldsmith, from Studio One episode "The Fair-Haired Boy" (Part 7)
Bedeker sits on cot.
Bedeker: "Forty, forty-five years."
Cadwallader (voice over): "After all, what's a few --

22:13 Dream Effects #1
Unknown
Cadwallader (voice over): "... hundred years, or a few thousand? Or five thousand or ten thousand? What is it in the scheme of things?" He lets out an evil voice over laugh.
Bedeker: "No, no, no, no, no, no, no!" A semi-transparent Cadwallader, seen only from the back, materializes in front of Bedeker, who is still visible through Cadwallader's body.
Cadwallader: "Mr. Bedeker, about that escape clause. Care to utilize it now? (Bedeker nods in defeat) That's a wise man. Odd thing: you look like a man having a heart attack. Just like a man having a heart attack."

22:44 Vibraphone
Unknown
This cue is completely overlapped by "Dream Effects #1," starting when Cadwallader materializes and ending with his "Odd thing."

23:08 Soldiers on Strings 3C
Bruce Campbell
Bedeker collapses.

23:11 Wow #3 Chord Only
M. Gordon
Bedeker's head hits the cot, and he rolls onto the floor. Cadwallader fades away.
Guard (running in): "Bedeker, that you? You all right?" He opens the cell door.
Note: There is a slight overlap with "Soldiers on Strings."

23:30 Twilight Zone Main Title
Bernard Herrmann
Rod does his outro.

Note: "The Fair-Haired Boy" is the title of the source for what is also known as “Jazz Theme #2” on the 40th Anniversary CD set (Disc 2, Track 8). The episode score is broken down into seven cues (or more likely six, as Part 4 can't be found) which have individual titles that I've given as primary:

Part 1: The Big Time
Part 2: The Giant Killer
Part 3: Hopes
Part 4: (Missing)
Part 5: A New Office
Part 6: The Meeting
Part 7: Too Many Ideas

The CD track is broken down as follows:

Too Many Ideas (:00-:32)
The Meeting (:32-1:42)
A New Office (1:43-2:11)
The Big Time (2:12-3:14)
Last edited by Dan Hollis on 3:05 AM - Mar 17, 2015, edited 1 time in total.
Thanks to Dr. Moreau for surprising me with this signature. It beats peach brandy!

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Dan Hollis
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5:18 AM - Feb 11, 2008 #19

Musical cues for "The Lonely"
(using starting time stamps from Image Entertainment pre-Definitive Edition, preceded in blue with time stamps calculated to begin at :00)

Original score composed and conducted by BERNARD HERRMANN

Episode starts at :00/1:16

Twilight Zone Theme (Lonely)
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Normally I confine my cue summaries to the episode content and ignore the main title, bumpers, and end title. Here is an exceptional case. The score for "The Lonely" includes a main title theme specially composed for use in this episode. By the time "The Lonely" premiered, though, it had been replaced with the main title used for the rest of Season 1 through "The Chaser," the form in which it exists in syndication and on the pre-DE DVD. The Definitive Edition restores this special theme, but this is an inaccurate depiction of the episode's premiere. Most likely the episode was produced with this special theme and then edited for the replacement, meaning that DE may have transferred a preserved unedited version. There is a corresponding closing theme that's identical except for the addition of a measure, but this isn't even on DE. The special theme can be heard in broadcasts of "The Lonely" that utilize DE, and in "Long Distance Call" as Chris finishes his plea to his mother.

:39/1:55 Introduction
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Rod introduces us to James A. Corry, in solitary confinement on an asteroid. Lead into commercial.

1:52/3:08 The Waiting
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Come out of commercial to panorama of asteroid and Corry's shack. Corry writes in his diary.
Corry (voice over): "Entry: Fifteenth day, sixth month, the Year Four. All the days and the months and the years the same. There'll be a supply ship coming in soon, I think. They're either due or overdue. (gets up and walks to window) And I hope it's Allenby's ship, because he's a decent man, and he brings things for me, like he brought in the parts for that antique automobile. That was a year putting that thing together, such as it is. A whole year putting an old car together. But thank God for that car, and for the hours I used up, and the days and the weeks. I can look at it out there, and I know that it's real. Reality is what I need. (walks over to cot) Because what is there left that I can believe in? That desert and the wind, the silence, or myself? (lies down) Can I believe in myself anymore?" Dissolve to spaceship landing. It awakens Corry, who runs over to the window and gleefully laughs at what he sees.

9:25/10:41 The Box
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Corry thinks for a few seconds after Allenby leaves. He calls out to Allenby through the window.
Corry: "Allenby, I don't much care what's in it. But for the thought, for the decency, thank you."
Allenby: "You're quite welcome, Corry." He leaves with crewmen Adams and Carstairs, pausing just long enough to give Corry a small wave. Corry cuts open the bands on the box and lifts its lid. He's startled at what he sees inside.

10:36/11:52 Alicia
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Cut to spaceship as Carstairs and Adams climb its ladder to enter.
Adams: "Hey, uh, Captain! Captain? Captain, what's, uh, what's in the big crate, huh?"
Allenby: "I'm not quite sure, really. Maybe just an illusion. Maybe it's salvation. I don't know. (sighs) Let's go." Dissolve to empty box. Pan up to Corry as he reads instruction manual.
Corry (reading): "You are now the proud possessor of a robot built in the form of a woman. To all intent and purpose this creature is a woman. (pan over to Alicia) Physiologically and psychologically she is a human being with a set of emotions and a memory track, the ability to reason, to think, and to speak. (cut back to Corry) She is beyond illness and under normal circumstances should have a life span similar to that of a normal human being. Her name is Alicia."
Alicia: "My name's Alicia. What's your name?"
Corry: "Get out of here! Get out of here! I don't need a machine. Go on, get outta here!"
Alicia: "My name's Alicia. What's your name?" Continue through mid-episode bumper and lead into commercial.
Note: This is the only episode whose score continues through a bumper.

12:31/13:47 George's Bar
Eric Cook
Come out of commercial to Corry listening to a record as Alicia brings him some water.
Alicia: "I brought you some water."
Corry: "Put it over there."
Alicia: "It'll get warm just sitting there."
Corry: "How would you know?"
Alicia: "I can feel thirst."
Corry: "Yeah? What else can you feel?"
Alicia: "I don't understand."
Note: The cue sheet incorrectly calls this "Turkish Delight," a different song by Cook.

14:12/15:28 Mockery
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Cut to outside as Alicia comes out of shack.
Alicia: "Corry? Corry?"
Corry: "You mock me, you know that? When you look at me, when you talk to me, I'm being mocked."
Alicia: "I'm sorry. You hurt me, Corry."
Corry: "Hurt you? How can I hurt you? (grabs her arm) This isn't real flesh. There aren't any nerves under there. There aren't any muscles or tendons. (pushes her to ground) You're just like this heap. A hunk of metal with arms and legs instead of wheels. But this heap doesn't mock me the way you do. It doesn't look at me with make-believe eyes or talk to me with a make-believe voice. Well, I'm sick of being mocked by the memory of women. And that's all you are. A reminder to me that I'm so lonely I'm about to lose my mind." Alicia turns her head to show that she's crying. Stunned, Corry kneels down to her and wipes away her tears.
Alicia: "I can feel loneliness, too."
Corry: "Oh, Alicia, I'm sorry." He helps her up. Fade to black.

16:01/17:17 Eleven Months
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Fade in to Corry and Alicia playing chess using nuts and washers for pieces.
Corry (voice over): "Alicia's been with me now for eleven months. It's difficult to write down what has been the sum total of this very strange and bizarre relationship. Is it man and woman, or man and machine? I don't really know myself. But there are times when I do know that Alicia is simply an extension of me. I hear my words coming from her, my emotions. The things that she has learned to love are those things that I have loved. (Alicia moves a piece and smiles at Corry, who smiles back) I'm not lonely anymore. Each day can now be lived with. I love Alicia. Nothing else matters."

16:55/18:11 The Stars
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Dissolve to asteroid landscape at night and pan upward to starry sky.
Corry (starting off camera): "And that's the star Betelgeuse. That's in the constellation of Orion. (cut to Corry with his hand on Alicia's shoulder as they gaze at the stars) And there's the Great Bear. See it with its pointer stars in line with the Northern Star? There's the constellation Hercules."
Alicia: "God's beauty."
Corry: "That's right, Alicia. God's beauty."
Alicia: "That star, Corry. What's that star?" Cut to white speck moving through sky.
Corry: "Oh, that's not a star. That's a ship."
Alicia: "A ship? But it can't be a ship. There isn't one due here for three months. You said after the last time not for another three months."
Corry: "It must be Allenby's ship. He's the only one that ever comes close. They stop at the other asteroids, and they come here. Hmm. That means we'll see them in the morning."
Alicia: "We'd better get back to the house, then."
Corry: "No." Cut back to white speck. Dissolve to spaceship landing.

21:26/22:42 Fear
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Corry: "... Alicia!" He runs away from Allenby.
Allenby: "Corry!"
Corry: "Alicia!  Alicia!"
Allenby: "Corry!"
Corry: "Alicia! (enters shack) Alicia? Alicia!"
Allenby: "Come on, Corry. Please!   Please!" He and Carstairs grab Corry's arms.
Adams: "Look, Corry. We just want you to get your gear packed and get out of here. We've got about fifteen minutes, Captain. How about it?"
Corry: "Look, I'm not leaving without her. Do you understand?" He breaks away and runs outside.
Allenby: "Corry!" He and his crew follow Corry.
Corry: "Alicia! Alicia! (he reaches her) Alicia! Alicia, show them! Talk to them! Show them! Talk to them, Alicia! Show them! Alicia, show them!"
Allenby: "I don't have any choice, Corry. I have no choice at all." He pulls out a gun.
Alicia: "Corry?"
Corry: "No! No!" Allenby fires the gun.  Alicia falls.

22:14/23:30 Farewell
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode scoreAllenby stares downward as Corry holds Allenby's arm.
Alicia (starting off camera): "Corry ... (pan across her body) Corry ... Corry ... Corry ... (voice slows down) Corry ... Corry --" End pan across body to show electronics inside her shattered face. Corry silently stares.
Adams (off camera): "We've got to go now, Captain."
Allenby (starting off camera): "We will go now. Come on, Corry. Time to go home. (cut to him) It's all behind you now, Corry. It's all behind you. It's like a bad dream, a nightmare. When you wake up you'll be back on Earth. You'll be home."
Corry: "Home?"
Allenby: "That's right. All you're leaving behind is loneliness."
Corry: "I must remember that. I must remember to keep that in mind." Allenby pats him on the arm, and he rises and starts to leave with the others.

23:30/24:46 Finale
Bernard Herrmann, from the episode score
Dissolve to asteroid panorama and cuts among various shots of abandoned venue, including Alicia's legs, as Rod does his outro.

The episode score is available on the 40th Anniversary CD set (Disc 1, Track 21) in suite form, with the cues arranged as follows:

The Waiting (:00-1:21)
Fear (1:21-2:10)
Introduction (2:10-3:24)
The Box (3:24-4:36)
Alicia (4:36-6:30)
Eleven Months (6:30-7:24)
Finale (7:24-8:04)
The Stars (8:04-9:50)
Farewell (9:50-11:11)
Last edited by Dan Hollis on 5:26 AM - Feb 14, 2014, edited 1 time in total.
Thanks to Dr. Moreau for surprising me with this signature. It beats peach brandy!

"We're sober men and true!" -- "You had to go have him!"
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cadwallader
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7:09 AM - Feb 11, 2008 #20

Actually the cue sheet is in error when it lists "Turkish Delight" as the record Corry is playing coming out of the 2nd commercial. It is actually "George's Bar", also by Eric Cook. (This piece can also be heard in "Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up".)

The score for "The Lonely" was composed in July, 1959, for the following instruments:

2 Vibraphones
2 Harps
1 Hammond Organ
3 Trumpets
3 Trombones

For unknown reasons Herrmann re-arranged the opening and closing title themes specifically for this episode, using the same instrumentation as used in the rest of the score. On the definitive edition DVD, only the new opening theme was used; the closing theme was the standard end title. This version of the opening theme was used as the title theme for this episode only, though it was re-used toward the end of “Long Distance Call”. On the score and on the cue sheet for that episode it is referred to as “Twilight Zone Theme (Lonely)”.

The cues were reused in the following episodes:

Twilight Zone Theme (Lonely) - “Long Distance Call”
Introduction – “Long Distance Call”
The Waiting – “The Last Night of a Jockey”
The Box – “Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up”
Alicia – “Long Distance Call”; “Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up”
Mockery – none
Eleven Months – none
The Stars – “Long Distance Call”
Fear – none
Farewell – “The Lateness of the Hour”; “Long Distance Call”
Finale – none

I will respond to your questions about "Escape Clause" tomorrow. And don't feel bad, that one was a big headache for me as well. But I think I've got it figured out.
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Dan Hollis
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Dan Hollis
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6:26 PM - Feb 12, 2008 #21

QUOTE (cadwallader @ February 11, 2008 02:09 am)
Actually the cue sheet is in error when it lists "Turkish Delight" as the record Corry is playing coming out of the 2nd commercial. It is actually "George's Bar", also by Eric Cook. (This piece can also be heard in "Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up".)

Change made, and thanks. I was going to ask you about this, since you noted this in the corrections summary you sent a while back.

Thanks also for your "Escape Clause" e-mail. I'll work on it later today and write back privately to you.
Thanks to Dr. Moreau for surprising me with this signature. It beats peach brandy!

"We're sober men and true!" -- "You had to go have him!"
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Dan Hollis
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3:27 AM - Feb 13, 2008 #22

Thanks to our Cadwallader for providing private help that has now allowed me to update the "Escape Clause" cue list and consider it final. He didn't even make me sign a contract.
Thanks to Dr. Moreau for surprising me with this signature. It beats peach brandy!

"We're sober men and true!" -- "You had to go have him!"
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Dan Hollis
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Dan Hollis
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6:10 PM - Feb 13, 2008 #23

Cad has confirmed the only questionable item I flagged for "The Lonely," so I have now removed the red comments from the cue list and consider it final. We also agreed that "Finale" in "Where Is Everybody?" is the same as the alternate series end title found on Disc 1, Track 22, of the 40th Anniversary CD set. I've added that fact to the "Where Is Everybody?" cue list.
Thanks to Dr. Moreau for surprising me with this signature. It beats peach brandy!

"We're sober men and true!" -- "You had to go have him!"
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Dan Hollis
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6:35 PM - Feb 13, 2008 #24

QUOTE (cadwallader @ February 11, 2008 02:09 am)
For unknown reasons Herrmann re-arranged the opening and closing title themes specifically for this episode, using the same instrumentation as used in the rest of the score. On the definitive edition DVD, only the new opening theme was used; the closing theme was the standard end title. This version of the opening theme was used as the title theme for this episode only, though it was re-used toward the end of “Long Distance Call”. On the score and on the cue sheet for that episode it is referred to as “Twilight Zone Theme (Lonely)”.
This is all correct, but it's my belief that the alternate themes for "The Lonely" were never broadcast on the two CBS telecasts (Season 1 premiere and Season 1 summer rerun season) of the episode. Admittedly I never saw the premiere, and although I like to think that its presence in the rerun would have stuck in my young impressionable mind, I can't be sure.

They have never appeared in either syndication or any pre-Definitive Edition recording as far as I can recall. Although the pre-DE DVDs have a handful of opening-closing theme combinations that were never heard on CBS, I have to believe that "The Lonely" has some authentic basis for what's heard on pre-DE. On the other hand, DE has made a supposedly restorative effort that in at least two cases is wrong -- "Mr. Denton on Doomsday" opened with the "Big Eye" only when it was rerun, while "A Passage for Trumpet" had the "Big Eye" when it premiered. So I consider "Definitive" a misnomer.

Here's the scenario I'm guessing. Again, I may be wrong:

1. As "The Lonely" was the first episode produced after "Where Is Everybody?" sold the series, Herrmann made a fresh start, composing new themes along with the new episode score.

2. For reasons I don't know, "The Lonely" was held back for premiere until the seventh episode.

3. After "The Lonely" was produced, subsequent episodes were given the WIE? themes, probably because they made a more favorable impression.

4. Before "The Lonely" premiered, the WIE? themes were substituted into it for broadcast consistency.

5. The DE producers either artificially inserted the alternate opening "Lonely" theme back into an episode print, or someone found a print with the alternate theme that had been prepared for broadcast but ultimately shelved.
Thanks to Dr. Moreau for surprising me with this signature. It beats peach brandy!

"We're sober men and true!" -- "You had to go have him!"
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7:39 PM - Feb 17, 2008 #25

Musical cues for "Time Enough at Last"
(using starting time stamps from Image Entertainment pre-Definitive Edition, [color=BLUE'>]preceded in blue with time stamps calculated to begin at :00[/color])

[font=TIMES'>][color=GREEN'>]Original score composed and conducted by LEITH STEVENS[/color][/font]

[color=BROWN'>]Note: The cue sheet says only "Twilight Zone Opening" and "Time Enough at Last Suite" besides the Herrmann framing music. Individual cue names come courtesy of Cad's research and a cue sheet constructed by Paul G. based on that research.[/color]

Episode starts at [color=#0000FF]:00[/color]/:12

[color=#0000FF]:39[/color]/:51 Twilight Zone Opening (Time)
[color=GREEN'>]Leith Stevens, from the episode score[/color]
Panoramic shot of the bank where Henry Bemis works as a teller. He's counting out money for Mrs. Chester.
Henry: "... two, three, four." Cut to show open book in his lap.

[color=BLUE'>]2:26[/color]/2:38 The President Commands
[color=GREEN'>]Leith Stevens, from the episode score[/color]
Henry's boss, Mr. Carsville, leads Henry into his office as Rod does his intro. Lead into commercial.

[color=BLUE'>]2:58[/color]/3:10 Introduction -- Time
[color=GREEN'>]Leith Stevens, from the episode score[/color]
Coming out of commercial, we see the PRESIDENT sign on Carsville's door.
Mr. Carsville: "Now, Mr. Bemis, I shall come to the point of this interview. --"

[color=BLUE'>]4:56[/color]/5:08 Good Day, Bemis
[color=GREEN'>]Leith Stevens, from the episode score[/color]
Henry starts to leave but pauses to look through a pile of magazines. When Carsville disapprovingly clears his throat, Henry proceeds out the door. Dissolve to the Bemis living room, where Henry sits and reads a newspaper. Helen, his wife, calls him via an excellent impression of Henry Aldrich's mother.
Helen (off camera): "Hen-ryyyy? Henry!"

[color=BLUE'>]6:30[/color]/6:42 Caught
[color=GREEN'>]Leith Stevens, from the episode score[/color]
Henry gets up and retrieves a book hidden under the seat cushion, sneaks it into his coat pocket, dons his coat, and heads out the door, only to find Helen waiting for him on the other side.

[color=BLUE'>]8:53[/color]/9:05 Lunch Time
[color=GREEN'>]Leith Stevens, from the episode score[/color]
Henry picks up the pages Helen tore out of his book. Fade to black. Fade in to bank, where Henry closes his cage and heads downstairs to the vault with his lunch and a newspaper. After carefully looking around, he closes the vault door behind himself.

[color=BLUE'>]10:41[/color]/10:53 Atom Bomb
[color=GREEN'>]Leith Stevens, from the episode score[/color]
Henry lies on the vault floor as a shaking camera indicates the final vibrations of a massive explosion. Lead into commercial.

[color=BLUE'>]10:48[/color]/11:00 Atom Bomb II
[color=GREEN'>]Leith Stevens, from the episode score[/color]
Coming out of commercial, a disheveled Henry, with his glasses out of place, stands up and tries to feel around.

[color=BLUE'>]13:23[/color]/13:35 A Dead World
[color=GREEN'>]Leith Stevens, from the episode score[/color]
Cut to bombed landscape. A terrified Henry looks in awe. Dissolve to Henry as he walks around, searching in vain for survivors.
Rod: "Seconds, minutes, hours. They crawl by on hands and knees for Mr. Henry Bemis, who looks for a spark in the ashes (Henry tries telephone in vain) of a dead world. A telephone connected to nothingness. (Henry arrives at the ruins of his house and looks at the mailbox) A neighborhood bar, a movie, a baseball diamond, a hardware store, the mailbox of what was once his house and is now a rubble. They lie at his feet as battered monuments to what was but is no more."
Henry: "Helen? Helen? Where are you?"
Rod: "Mr. Henry Bemis, on an eight-hour tour of a graveyard."
Henry: "They're all dead. They must be. Everybody's dead except me. I'm all right. Why I am all right? I was right there in the middle of -- the vault! I was down in the vault. That's why I'm alive. I was down in the -- The thing of it is, though, the thing of it is, I'm not at all sure that I want to be alive."

[color=BLUE'>]15:33[/color]/15:45 The Market
[color=GREEN'>]Leith Stevens, from the episode score[/color]
Dissolve to wreckage of a grocery store. Dissolve to Henry sitting inside.
Henry: "Well, I'm not going to starve to death, anyway. Lots of food, food enough to last for years and years and years and years. (grabs a cracker and eats it) All the food I can eat. All the food and more, too." Dissolve to Henry on tattered sofa. He puts a lit cigarette into his mouth, covers himself with his jacket, and lies down.
Henry: "Let's see. The worst part, the very worst part is being alone. Is this how it's gonna be, just sitting around day after day eating, smoking a cigarette, reading the same half of a newspaper over and over? Over ... again?" He falls asleep. Dissolve to later as he wakes up. He stands up, puts on his jacket, stares, and trots toward the wreckage of an automobile. He gets into it, honks the horn madly, and turns the ignition key.

[color=BLUE'>]18:04[/color]/18:16 Solitude
[color=GREEN'>]Leith Stevens, from the episode score[/color]
The engine hasn't started, so Henry tries again in vain. He gets out and starts calling into the uncaring landscape.
Henry: "Someone there? Please, someone? Is someone there? Someone? No, no, no, no, no, no. No, that doesn't make any difference. No, it doesn't ... it doesn't make a bit of difference. It's quite all right. Now this is solitude. I've never had much solitude. I have enough to occupy my mind and my time. I have enough food, and I ... I am really very fortunate. Yes, I'm really extremely fortunate. Help! Help! Help! Someone, please! Someone, please! Please, someone! Help! Please! Someone, please! (dissolve to Henry as he arrives at wreckage of a sporting good store) Someone! (walks through wreckage, knocks over display case, and grabs revolver that was in it) Oh, if it just weren't for the loneliness. If it just weren't for the sameness. If there were just something to do, do, do. Oh, I ... I'm sure I'll be forgiven for this, the way things are. I know I'll be forgiven." He points the gun to his temple. Cut to the downed pillar entrance to the public library. Cut back to the surprised Henry as he slowly lowers the gun.
[color=MAGENTA'>]Note: There is a slight overlap with "The Market."[/color]
[color=MAGENTA'>]Note: "A Dead World" through "Solitude" are three consecutive cues creating an unbroken 7:19 of music.[/color]

[color=BLUE'>]22:49[/color]/23:01 There Was Time
[color=GREEN'>]Leith Stevens, from the episode score[/color]
Henry looks down at his shattered glasses. From his point of view, they're just a blur. He feels for them and picks them up, but the fragments of the lenses just fall out.
Henry: "That's not fair. That's not fair at all. There was time now. There was ... was all the time I needed. (tearfully) That's not fair! That's not fair!" Rod does his outro.

[color=BROWN'>]None of these cues was ever recycled into another TZ episode.

Here is more information about composer Leith Stevens (whose first name rhymes with "teeth").[/color]
Thanks to Dr. Moreau for surprising me with this signature. It beats peach brandy!

"We're sober men and true!" -- "You had to go have him!"
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